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Structural Evaluation of Underground Waste Storage Tanks

Description: To set forth limiting values of internal vapor pressure and effective liquid specific gravity which will permit the maximum utilization of the existing underground waste storage capacity. It is also intended to describe briefly the elements which could contribute to ultimate failure.
Date: June 23, 1955
Creator: Smith, Edgar F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Sonar atlas of caverns comprising the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve. Volume 3, Bryan Mound Site, Texas.

Description: Downhole sonar surveys from the four active U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve sites have been modeled and used to generate a four-volume sonar atlas, showing the three-dimensional geometry of each cavern. This volume 3 focuses on the Bryan Mound SPR site, located in southeastern Texas. Volumes 1, 2, and 4, respectively, present images for the Bayou Choctaw SPR site, Louisiana, the Big Hill SPR site, Texas, and the West Hackberry SPR site, Louisiana. The atlas uses a consistent presentation format throughout. The basic geometric measurements provided by the down-cavern surveys have also been used to generate a number of geometric attributes, the values of which have been mapped onto the geometric form of each cavern using a color-shading scheme. The intent of the various geometrical attributes is to highlight deviations of the cavern shape from the idealized cylindrical form of a carefully leached underground storage cavern in salt. The atlas format does not allow interpretation of such geometric deviations and anomalies. However, significant geometric anomalies, not directly related to the leaching history of the cavern, may provide insight into the internal structure of the relevant salt dome.
Date: September 1, 2007
Creator: Rautman, Christopher Arthur & Lord, Anna Snider
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Utilization of the MPI Process for in-tank solidification of heel material in large-diameter cylindrical tanks

Description: A major problem faced by the US Department of Energy is remediation of sludge and supernatant waste in underground storage tanks. Exhumation of the waste is currently the preferred remediation method. However, exhumation cannot completely remove all of the contaminated materials from the tanks. For large-diameter tanks, amounts of highly contaminated ``heel'' material approaching 20,000 gal can remain. Often sludge containing zeolite particles leaves ``sand bars'' of locally contaminated material across the floor of the tank. The best management practices for in-tank treatment (stabilization and immobilization) of wastes require an integrated approach to develop appropriate treatment agents that can be safely delivered and mixed uniformly with sludge. Ground Environmental Services has developed and demonstrated a remotely controlled, high-velocity jet delivery system termed, Multi-Point-Injection (MPI). This robust jet delivery system has been field-deployed to create homogeneous monoliths containing shallow buried miscellaneous waste in trenches [fiscal year (FY) 1995] and surrogate sludge in cylindrical (FY 1998) and long, horizontal tanks (FY 1999). During the FY 1998 demonstration, the MPI process successfully formed a 32-ton uniform monolith of grout and waste surrogates in about 8 min. Analytical data indicated that 10 tons of zeolite-type physical surrogate were uniformly mixed within a 40-in.-thick monolith without lifting the MPI jetting tools off the tank floor. Over 1,000 lb of cohesive surrogates, with consistencies similar to Gunite and Associated Tank (GAAT) TH-4 and Hanford tank sludges, were easily intermixed into the monolith without exceeding a core temperature of 100 F during curing.
Date: January 1, 2000
Creator: Kauschinger, J.L. & Lewis, B.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Leaking Underground Storage Tanks: Prevention and Cleanup

Description: This report addresses a nationwide water pollution problem caused by leaking underground storage tanks (USTs). The report discusses key issue that state resources have not met the demands of administering the underground storage tanks (UST) leak prevention program.
Date: July 10, 2008
Creator: Tiemann, Mary
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

"Bunker Busters": Sources of Confusion in the Robust Nuclear Earth Penetrator Debate

Description: Earth penetrator weapons, often called “bunker busters,” burrow into the ground some tens of feet before detonating, greatly increasing their ability to destroy buried targets. The United States has several types of conventional earth penetrators. The Air Force and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) are studying a more effective penetrator, the Robust Nuclear Earth Penetrator (RNEP). The FY2005 defense authorization act contained the full RNEP request, $27.6 million. This report explains the budget request and provides details on the RNEP plan.
Date: January 10, 2005
Creator: Medalia, Jonathan
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

"Bunker Busters": Sources of Confusion in the Robust Nuclear Earth Penetrator Debate

Description: The Robust Nuclear Earth Penetrator (RNEP), often called a “bunker buster,” is at present the subject of a cost and feasibility study to determine if either of two nuclear bombs, the B61 and the B83, could be modified, mainly by adding a heavy, pointed case, so as to be able to penetrate perhaps 10 meters into earth or rock. This penetration would increase the weapon’s ability, by a factor of 20 to 50, to destroy hardened and deeply buried facilities. The RNEP debate has received much attention and spawned much confusion. This report examines sources of confusion in this debate.
Date: September 22, 2004
Creator: Medalia, Jonathan
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Linear Scarifying End-Effector Developed For Wall Cleaning In Underground Storage Tanks

Description: This paper describes the development and performance of a Linear Scarifying End-Effector (LSEE) designed and fabricated for deployment by a remotely operated vehicle. The end-effector was designed to blast or scarify in-grained residual contamination from gunite tank walls using high-pressure water jets after the bulk sludge had been removed from the tanks using an integrated suite of remotely operated tools. Two generations of the LSEE were fabricated, tested, and deployed in the gunite tanks at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, with varying levels of success. Because the LSEE was designed near the end of a four-year project to clean up the gunite tanks at Oak Ridge, a number of design constraints existed. The end-effector had to utilize pneumatic, hydraulic and electrical interfaces already available at the site; and to be deployable through one of the containment structures already in place for the other remote systems. Another primary design consideration was that the tool had to effectively extend the reach of an existing remotely operated vehicle from six ft. to at least ten ft. to allow cleaning the tank walls from floor to ceiling. In addition, the combined weight and thrust of the LSEE had to be manageable by the manipulator mounted on the vehicle. Finally, the end-effector had to follow an autonomous scarifying path such that the vehicle was only required to reposition the unit at the end of each pass after the mist had cleared from the tank. The prototypes successfully met each of these challenges, but did encounter other difficulties during actual tank operations.
Date: February 4, 2001
Creator: Fitzgerald, C.L.F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

FY 1999 cold demonstration of the Multi-Point Injection (MPI) process for stabilizing contaminated sludge in buried horizontal tanks with limited access at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Description: A major problem faced by the U.S. Department of Energy is the remediation of buried tank waste. Exhumation of the sludge is currently the preferred remediation method. However, exhumation does not typically remove all the contaminated material from the tank. The best management practices for in-tank treatment of wastes require an integrated approach to develop appropriate treatment agents that can be safely delivered and uniformly mixed with the sludge. Ground Environmental Services, Inc., has developed and demonstrated a remotely controlled, high-velocity, jet-delivery system, which is termed Multi-Point-Injection (MPI{trademark}). This robust jet-delivery system has been used to create homogeneous monoliths containing shallow-buried miscellaneous waste in trenches [fiscal year (FY) 1995] and surrogate sludge in a cylindrical test tank (FY 1998). During the FY 1998 demonstration, the MPI process was able to successfully form a 32-ton uniform monolith in about 8 min. Analytical data indicated that 10 tons of a zeolite-type physical surrogate were uniformly mixed within the 40-inch-thick monolith without lifting the MPI jetting tools off the tank floor. Over 1,000 lb of cohesive surrogates, with consistencies of Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAATs) TH-4 and Hanford tank sludges, were easily mixed into the monolith without exceeding a core temperature of 100 F during curing.
Date: January 1, 2000
Creator: Kauschinger, J.L.; Lewis, B.E. & Spence, R.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Status and needs for tank isolation system contingencies at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Description: This document assesses the need for additional tank isolation systems and tooling at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Locations for future operations at ORNL include the South and North Tank Farms and various Federal Facilities Agreement tanks. The goal of this report is to identify future needs for development of remote tools and systems to isolate inactive waste storage tanks.
Date: January 1, 2000
Creator: Chesser, J.B. & Lewis, B.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Permanent Closure of the TAN-664 Underground Storage Tank

Description: This closure package documents the site assessment and permanent closure of the TAN-664 gasoline underground storage tank in accordance with the regulatory requirements established in 40 CFR 280.71, 'Technical Standards and Corrective Action Requirements for Owners and Operators of Underground Storage Tanks: Out-of-Service UST Systems and Closure.'
Date: December 1, 2011
Creator: Griffith, Bradley K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Removal of mixing pump in tank 102-AP -- pump drop onto central pit

Description: The mixing pump, if dropped in the pump pit following its removal from the tank, is incapable of compromising the tank structure either locally or in a structural displacement mode to an extent which might allow dispersion of the contents. A drop from 10 ft above the pit floor (considered the maximum credible height) of a pump which is considered perfectly rigid does not approach the required perforation velocity. The velocity required to perforate requires a drop height which is physically impossible to attain with existing cranes. An analysis of the location of the deposition of the strain energy required to match the pump`s impact kinetic energy, the results of which are shown in Table 2, verifies that there is no credible chance for compromise of the tank roof by such a drop.
Date: June 20, 1995
Creator: Jimenez, R. F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Integrity assessment plan for PNL 300 area radioactive hazardous waste tank system. Final report

Description: The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), operated by Battelle Memorial Institute under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy, operates tank systems for the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL), that contain dangerous waste constituents as defined by Washington State Department of Ecology (WDOE) Dangerous Waste Regulations, Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-040(18). Chapter 173-303-640(2) of the WAC requires the performance of integrity assessments for each existing tank system that treats or stores dangerous waste, except those operating under interim status with compliant secondary containment. This Integrity Assessment Plan (IAP) identifies all tasks that will be performed during the integrity assessment of the PNL-operated Radioactive Liquid Waste Systems (RLWS) associated with the 324 and 325 Buildings located in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. It describes the inspections, tests, and analyses required to assess the integrity of the PNL RLWS (tanks, ancillary equipment, and secondary containment) and provides sufficient information for adequate budgeting and control of the assessment program. It also provides necessary information to permit the Independent, Qualified, Registered Professional Engineer (IQRPE) to approve the integrity assessment program.
Date: March 1, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

TWRS privatization support project waste characterization resource dictionary

Description: A single estimate of waste characteristics for each underground storage tanks at the Hanford Site is not available. The information that is available was developed for specific programmatic objectives and varies in format and level of descriptive detail, depending on the intended application. This dictionary reflects an attempt to define what waste characterization information is available. It shows the relationship between the identified resource and the original data source and the inter-relationships among the resources; it also provides a brief description of each resource. Developed as a general dictionary for waste characterization information, this document is intended to make the user aware of potenially useful resources.
Date: September 1, 1996
Creator: Patello, G.K. & Wiemers, K.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Design assessment for the Melton Valley Storage Tanks capacity increase at Oak Ridge National Laboratory under the Federal Facility Agreement, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

Description: This project was initiated to find ways to increase storage capacity for the liquid low-level waste (LLLW) system at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and satisfy the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) requirement for the transfer of LLW from existing tank systems not in full FFA compliance.
Date: November 1, 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

241-SY-101 DACS High hydrogen abort limit reduction (SCR 473) acceptance test report

Description: The capability of the 241-SY-101 Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS) computer system to provide proper control and monitoring of the 241-SY-101 underground storage tank hydrogen monitoring system utilizing the reduced hydrogen abort limit of 0.69% was systematically evaluated by the performance of ATP HNF-4927. This document reports the results of the ATP.
Date: September 9, 1999
Creator: ERMI, A.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Inactive Tanks Remediation Program strategy and plans for Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

Description: The overall objective of the Inactive Tank Remediation Program is to remediate all LLLW tanks that have been removed fimn service to the extent practicable in accordance with the FFA and CERCLA requirements. Applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements (ARARs) will be addressed in choosing a remediation alternative. Preference will be given to remedies that are highly reliable and provide long-term protection. Efforts will be directed toward permanently and significantly reducing the volume, toxicity, or mobility of hazardous substances, pollutants, and contaminants associated with the tank systems. Where indicated by operational or other restraints, interim measures short of full and complete remediation may be taken to maintain human health and ecological risks at acceptable levels until full remediation can be accomplished.
Date: June 1, 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Long-term safety issues associated with mixer pump operation

Description: In this report, we examine several long-term issues: the effect of pump operation on future gas release events (GREs), uncontrolled chemical reactions, chronic toxic gas releases, foaming, and erosion and corrosion. Heat load in excess of the design limit, uncontrolled chemical reactions, chronic toxic gas releases, foaming, and erosion and corrosion have been shown not to be safety concerns. The effect of pump operation on future GREs could not be quantified. The problem with evaluating the long-term effects of pump operation on GREs is a lack of knowledge and uncertainty. In particular, the phenomena governing gas retention, particle size distribution, and settling are not well understood, nor are the interactions among these factors understood. There is a possibility that changes in these factors could increase the size of future GREs. Bounding estimates of the potential increase in size of GREs are not possible because of a lack of engineering data. Proper management of the hazards can reduce, but not eliminate, the possibility of undesirable changes. Maintaining temperature within the historical limits can reduce the possibility of undesirable changes. A monitoring program to detect changes in the gas composition and crust thickness will help detect slowly occurring changes. Because pump operation has be shown to eliminate GREs, continued pump operation can eliminate the hazards associated with future GREs.
Date: December 31, 1994
Creator: Kubic, W.L. Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Hanford tank clean up: A guide to understanding the technical issues

Description: One of the most difficult technical challenges in cleaning up the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site in southeast Washington State will be to process the radioactive and chemically complex waste found in the Site`s 177 underground storage tanks. Solid, liquid, and sludge-like wastes are contained in 149 single- and 28 double-shelled steel tanks. These wastes contain about one half of the curies of radioactivity and mass of hazardous chemicals found on the Hanford Site. Therefore, Hanford cleanup means tank cleanup. Safely removing the waste from the tanks, separating radioactive elements from inert chemicals, and creating a final waste form for disposal will require the use of our nation`s best available technology coupled with scientific advances, and an extraordinary commitment by all involved. The purpose of this guide is to inform the reader about critical issues facing tank cleanup. It is written as an information resource for the general reader as well as the technically trained person wanting to gain a basic understanding about the waste in Hanford`s tanks -- how the waste was created, what is in the waste, how it is stored, and what are the key technical issues facing tank cleanup. Access to information is key to better understanding the issues and more knowledgeably participating in cleanup decisions. This guide provides such information without promoting a given cleanup approach or technology use.
Date: December 31, 1995
Creator: Gephart, R.E. & Lundgren, R.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Results of 1995 characterization of Gunite and Associated Tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

Description: This technical memorandum (TM) documents the 1995 characterization of eight underground radioactive waste tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These tanks belong to the Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAAT) operable unit, and the characterization is part of the ongoing GAAT remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) process. This TM reports both field observations and analytical results; analytical results are also available from the Oak Ridge Environmental Information System (OREIS) data base under the project name GAAT (PROJ-NAME = GAAT). This characterization effort (Phase II) was a follow-up to the {open_quotes}Phase I{close_quotes} sampling campaign reported in Results of Fall 1994 Sampling of Gunite and Associated Tanks at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, ORNL/ER/Sub/87-99053/74, June 1995. The information contained here should be used in conjunction with that in the previous TM. The sampling plan is documented in ORNL Inactive Waste Tanks Sampling and Analysis Plan, ORNL/RAP/LTR-88/24, dated April 1988, as amended by Addendum 1, Revision 2: ORNL Inactive Tanks Sampling and Analysis Plan, DOE/OR/02-1354&D2, dated February 1995. Field team instructions are found in ORNL RI/FS Project Field Work Guides 01-WG-20, Field Work Guide for Sampling of Gunite and Associated Tanks, and 01-WG-21, Field Work Guide for Tank Characterization System Operations at ORNL. The field effort was conducted under the programmatic and procedural umbrella of the ORNL RI/FS Program, and the analysis was in accordance with ORNL Chemical and Analytical Sciences Division (CASD) procedures. The characterization campaign is intended to provide data for criticality safety, engineering design, and waste management as they apply to the GAAT treatability study and remediation. The Department of Energy (DOE) Carlsbad office was interested in results of this sampling campaign and provided funding for certain additional sample collection and analysis.
Date: February 1, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Strategic Petroleum Reserve quarterly report

Description: The Strategic Petroleum Reserve was created pursuant to the Energy Policy and Conservation Act of December 22, 1975 (Public Law 94-163). Its purposes are to reduce the impact of disruptions in supplies of petroleum products and to carry out obligations of the United States under the Agreement on an International Energy Program. Section 165(a) of the Act requires the submission of Annual Reports and Section 165(b)(1) requires the submission of Quarterly Reports. This Quarterly Report highlights activities undertaken during the third quarter of calendar year 1995, including: inventory of petroleum products stored in the Reserve; current storage capacity and ullage available; current status of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve storage facilities, major projects and the acquisition of petroleum products; funds obligated by the Secretary from the SPR Petroleum Account and the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Account during the prior calendar quarter and in total; and major environmental actions completed, in progress, or anticipated.
Date: November 15, 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Gas retention and release behavior in Hanford single-shell waste tanks

Description: This report describes the current understanding of flammable gas retention and release in Hanford single-shell waste tanks based on theory, experimental results, and observations of tank behavior. The single-shell tanks likely to pose a flammable gas hazard are listed and described, and photographs of core extrusions and the waste surface are included. The credible mechanisms for significant flammable gas releases are described, and release volumes and rates are quantified as much as possible. The only mechanism demonstrably capable of producing large ({approximately}100 m{sup 3}) spontaneous gas releases is the buoyant displacement, which occurs only in tanks with a relatively deep layer of supernatant liquid. Only the double-shell tanks currently satisfy this condition. All release mechanisms believed plausible in single-shell tanks have been investigated, and none have the potential for large spontaneous gas releases. Only small spontaneous gas releases of several cubic meters are likely by these mechanisms. The reasons several other postulated gas release mechanisms are implausible or incredible are also given.
Date: December 1996
Creator: Stewart, C. W.; Brewster, M. E.; Gauglitz, P. A.; Mahoney, L. A.; Meyer, P. A.; Recknagle, K. P. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Operational tank leak detection and minimization during retrieval

Description: This report evaluates the activities associated with the retrieval of wastes from the single-shell tanks proposed under the initial Single-Shell Tank Retrieval System. This report focuses on minimizing leakage during retrieval by using effective leak detection and mitigating actions. After reviewing the historical data available on single-shell leakage, and evaluating current leak detection technology, this report concludes that the only currently available leak detection method which can function within the most probable leakage range is the mass balance system. If utilized after each sluicing campaign, this method should allow detection at a leakage value well below the leakage value where significant health effects occur which is calculated for each tank. Furthermore, this report concludes that the planned sequence or sluicing activities will serve to further minimize the probability and volume of leaks by keeping liquid away from areas with the greatest potential for leaking. Finally, this report identifies a series of operational responses which when used in conjunction with the recommended sluicing sequence and leak detection methods will minimize worker exposure and environmental safety health risks.
Date: March 1, 1996
Creator: Hertzel, J.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department