2,763 Matching Results

Search Results

Advanced search parameters have been applied.

Fracture Characteristics in a Disposal Pit on Mesita del Buey, Los Alamos National Laboratory

Description: The characteristics of fractures in unit 2 of the Tshirege Member of the Bandelier Tuff were documented in Pit 39, a newly excavated 13.7 m deep disposal pit at Material Disposal Area G on Mesita del Buey. The average spacing between fractures is about 1.0 to 1.3 m, the average fracture aperture is about 3 to 5 mm, and the average fracture dip is about 76o to 77o. Fracture spacing and dip in Pit 39 are generally consistent with that reported from other fracture studies on the Pajarito Plateau, although the fracture apertures in Pit 39 are less than reported elsewhere. Measured fracture orientations are strongly affected by biases imparted by the orientations of the pit walls, which, combined with a small data set, make identification of potential preferred orientations dlfflcult. The most prominent fracture orientations observed in Pit 39, about E-W and N20E, are often not well represented elsewhere on the Pajarito Plateau. Fracture fills contain smectite to about 3 m depth, and calcite and opal may occur at all depths, principally associated with roots or root fossils (rhizoliths). Roots of pifion pine extend in fractures to the bottom of the pit along the north side, perhaps indicating a zone of preferred infiltration of water. Finely powdered tuff with clay-sized particles occurs within a number of fractures and may record abrasive disaggregation associated with small amounts of displacement on minor local faults.
Date: December 1, 1998
Creator: Vaniman, David T. & Reneau, Steven L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Deep borehole disposition of surplus fissile materials-The site selection process

Description: One option for disposing of excess weapons plutonium is to place it near the base of deep boreholes in stable crystalline rocks. The technology exists to immediately begin the design of this means of disposition and there are many attractive sites available within the conterminous US. The borehole system utilizes mainly natural barriers to preven migration of Pu and U to the Earth`s surface. Careful site selection ensures favorable geologic conditions that provide natural long-lived migration barriers; they include deep, extremely stable rock formations, strongly reducing brines that exhibit increasing salinity with depth, and most importantly, demonstrated isolation or non-communication of deep fluids with the biosphere for millions of years. This isolation is the most important characteristic, with the other conditions mainly being those that will enhance the potential of locating and maintaining the isolated zones. Candidate sites will probably be located on the craton in very old Precambrian crystalline rocks, most likely the center of a granitic pluton. The sites will be located in tectonically stable areas with no recent volcanic or seismic activity, and situated away from tectonic features that might become active in the near geologic future.
Date: May 1, 1996
Creator: Heiken, G.; WoldeGabriel, G.; Morley, R. & Plannerer, H
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Long-length contaminated equipment burial containers fabrication process procedures

Description: These special process procedures cover the detailed step-by-step procedures required by the supplier who will manufacture the Long-Length Contaminated Equipment (LLCE) Burial Container design. Also included are detailed step-by-step procedures required by the disposal process for completion of the LLCE Burial Containers at Hanford.
Date: March 11, 1997
Creator: McCormick, W.A., Fluor Daniel Hanford
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Remediating the INEL`s buried mixed waste tanks

Description: The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), formerly the National Reactor Testing Station (NRTS), encompasses 890 square miles and is located in southeast Idaho. In 1949, the United States Atomic Energy Commission, now the Department of Energy (DOE), established the NRTS as a site for the building and testing of nuclear facilities. Wastes generated during the building and testing of these nuclear facilities were disposed within the boundaries of the site. These mixed wastes, containing radionuclides and hazardous materials, were often stored in underground tanks for future disposal. The INEL has 11 buried mixed waste storage tanks regulated under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) ranging in size from 400 to 50,000 gallons. These tanks are constructed of either stainless or carbon steel and are located at 3 distinct geographic locations across the INEL. These tanks have been grouped based on their similarities in an effort to save money and decrease the time required to complete the necessary remediation. Environmental Restoration and Technology Development personnel are teaming in an effort to address the remediation problem systematically.
Date: February 28, 1996
Creator: Kuhns, D.J.; Matthern, G.E. & Reese, C.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Spent nuclear fuel project quality assurance program plan

Description: This main body of this document describes how the requirements of 10 CFR 830.120 are met by the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project through implementation of WHC-SP-1131. Appendix A describes how the requirements of DOE/RW-0333P are met by the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project through implementation of specific policies, manuals, and procedures.
Date: May 9, 1997
Creator: Lacey, R. E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Parametric thermal evaluations of waste package emplacement

Description: Parametric thermal evaluations of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) waste packages (WPs) emplaced in the potential repository were performed to determine the impact of thermal loading, WP spacing, drift diameter, SNF aging, backfill, and relocation on the design of the Engineered Barrier System. Temperatures in the WP and near-field host rock are key to radionuclide containment, as they directly affect oxidation rates of the metal barriers and the ability of the rock to impede particle movement which must be demonstrated for a safe and licensable repository. Maximum allowable temperatures are based on material performance criteria and are specified as the following design goals for the WP/EBS design: SNF cladding 350{degrees}C, drift wall 200{degrees}C, and TSw3 rock 115{degrees}C.
Date: February 1, 1996
Creator: Bahney, R.H. III & Doering, T.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Underground mining and deep geologic disposal - Two compatible and complementary activities

Description: Active and mature underground mining districts offer conditions favorable to deep geologic disposal because their geology is known in more detail, the feasibility of underground excavations has already been demonstrated, mining leaves distinctive footprints and records that alert subsequent generations to the anthropogenic alterations of the underground environment, and subsequent exploration and production proceeds with great care and accuracy to locate and generally to avoid old mine workings. Compatibility of mining with deep geologic waste disposal has been proven by decades of experience with safe storage and disposal in former mines and in the mined-out areas of still active mining operations. Mineral extraction around an intended repository reduces the incentive for future disturbance. Incidental features of mineral exploration and extraction such as lost circulation zones, allochthonous backfill, and permanent surface markers can deter future intrusion into a repository. Thus exploration and production of mineral resources should be compatible with, and complementary to, deep geologic waste disposal.
Date: December 31, 1995
Creator: Rempe, N.T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation of Neutron Poison Materials for DOE SNF Disposal Systems

Description: Aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel (Al-SNF) from foreign and domestic research reactors is being consolidated at the Savannah River Site (SRS) for ultimate disposal in the Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS). Most of the aluminum-based fuel material contains highly enriched uranium (HEU) (more than 20 percent 235U), which challenges the preclusion of criticality events for disposal periods exceeding 10,000 years. Recent criticality analyses have shown that the addition of neutron absorbing materials (poisons) is needed in waste packages containing DOE SNF canisters fully loaded with Al-SNF under flooded and degraded configurations to demonstrate compliance with the requirement that Keff less than 0.95. Compatibility of poison matrix materials and the Al-SNF, including their relative degradation rate and solubility, are important to maintain criticality control. An assessment of the viability of poison and matrix materials has been conducted, and an experimental corrosion program has been initiated to provide data on degradation rates of poison and matrix materials and Al-SNF materials under repository relevant vapor and aqueous environments. Initial testing includes Al6061, Type 316L stainless steel, and A516Gr55 in synthesized J-13 water vapor at 50 degrees C, 100 degrees C, and 200 degrees C and in condensate water vapor at 100 degrees C. Preliminary results are presented herein.
Date: September 1, 1998
Creator: Vinson, D.W.; Caskey, G.R. Jr. & Sindelar, R.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Burial container subsidence load stress calculations

Description: This document captures the supporting analyses conducted to determine if the LLCE (Long-Length Contaminated Equipment) burial containers are structurally adequate under different trench closure scenarios. The LLCE is equipment that was inside tank farm tanks.
Date: November 1, 1995
Creator: Veith, E.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Bentonite as a waste isolation pilot plant shaft sealing material

Description: Current designs of the shaft sealing system for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) propose using bentonite as a primary sealing component. The shaft sealing designs anticipate that compacted bentonite sealing components can perform through the 10,000-year regulatory period and beyond. To evaluate the acceptability of bentonite as a sealing material for the WIPP, this report identifies references that deal with the properties and characteristics of bentonite that may affect its behavior in the WIPP environment. This report reviews published studies that discuss using bentonite as sealing material for nuclear waste disposal, environmental restoration, toxic and chemical waste disposal, landfill liners, and applications in the petroleum industry. This report identifies the physical and chemical properties, stability and seal construction technologies of bentonite seals in shafts, especially in a saline brine environment. This report focuses on permeability, swelling pressure, strength, stiffness, longevity, and densification properties of bentonites.
Date: December 1, 1996
Creator: Daemen, J. & Ran, Chongwei
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Waste analysis plan for the low-level burial grounds. Revision 2

Description: The purpose of this waste analysis plan (WAP) is to document the waste 5 acceptance process, sampling methodologies, analytical techniques, and overall 6 processes that are undertaken for waste accepted for disposal at the Low-Level 7 Burial Grounds (LLBG), which are located in the 200 East and 200 West Areas of 8 the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington. Because dangerous waste does not 9 include the source, special nuclear, and by-product material components of 10 mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this documentation. 11 The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge. The 12 LLBG also receive low-level radioactive waste for disposal. The requirements 13 of this WAP are not applicable to this low-level waste.
Date: June 9, 1997
Creator: Pratt, D.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

In tank processing safety analysis program summary report. Revision 2

Description: The purpose of this summary report is to present results from the safety analysis work that was performed in support of the ``Seismic Safety Issue Resolution Program Plan`` for the In-Tank Processing (ITP) Facility. Results from this effort include estimates of the consequences that postulated earthquakes might introduce. For beyond evaluation based earthquake (EBE) events, best estimate values (e.g., waste tank volumes) are used rather than bounding values to analyze the consequences of such events. This is consistent with the probabilistic approach outlined in Attachment C of the program plan. Planned follow-on work will also involve best estimates of probabilities for soil liquefaction and differential settlement. These probabilities will be combined in an accident progression event tree (APET) model that is used to provide estimates of risk for beyond EBE seismic events.
Date: November 1, 1994
Creator: Radder, J.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Waste analysis plan for the low-level burial grounds

Description: This waste analysis plan (WAP) has been prepared for the Low-Level Burial Grounds (LLBG) which are located in the 200 East and West Areas of the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington. This WAP documents the methods used to characterize, and obtain and analyze representative samples of waste managed at this unit.
Date: September 19, 1996
Creator: Haas, C.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Zircons and fluids: An experimental investigation with applications for radioactive waste storage. Final report, July 1, 1988--July 31, 1994

Description: The project objective was to develop a relationship between the stability of zircons (both natural and synthetic) with variable levels of radiation damage to fluids because of the clear relationship between enhanced solubility (leachability) and {alpha} - damage, our research was able to quantify this process. We also analyzed the mechanics of fractures induced due to both radiation and temperature enhanced stresses. Both objective were successfully carried out, and although details are available in progress reports and referred publications, a brief summary is presented here.
Date: May 1, 1998
Creator: Sinha, A.K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Microearthquakes induced by a hydraulic injection in sedimentary rock, East Texas

Description: In October, 1993, ARCO carried out a hydraulic injection near Beaumont, TX, into an unconsolidated sand, the Frio Formation. Fluid was injected into a 55m long zone at a depth of 1350 m. Four separate injections were done during 5 days. A total of more than 2.1 million gallons of bentonite slurry was injected, along with more than 3 million pounds of sand. Downhole fluid injection pressures ranged between about 3000 and 3500 psi. Induced microearthquakes were monitored by a set of 25 geophone packages situated in each of two monitoring well. More than 2400 microearthquakes were recorded during the injection, although most were too small to locate reliably using arrival times. A total of 54 microearthquakes were selected for detailed study. They were precisely located using arrival times of P and S phases from both of the monitoring boreholes. These locations are distributed non-uniformly, with a cluster near the injection borehole, a linear distribution about 200 m from the injection borehole, and a relatively quiet zone in between. The relatively nonseismic behavior in the middle zone compared to the other two zones suggests that this zone represent a discontinuity in the Frio Formation, although no obvious discontinuity has been identified from logs or nearby seismic reflection profiles. The large vertical extent of the geophone packages allowed an inversion of the arrival times for transverse isotropic elastic parameters, which yielded Vp anisotropy of about -13% and Vs of about -2%. Since these anisotropy values indicate that the vertical Vp and Vs are larger than the horizontal, they are surprising for this well bedded formation. Single-event focal mechanisms could be determined for 47 of the microearthquakes, and all are shear slip type. They show a large range of mechanisms, ranging from normal to reverse slip. Normal or oblique-normal slip predominant though, ...
Date: August 1, 1996
Creator: House, L.; Flores, R. & Withers, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Addendum to the performance assessment analysis for low-level waste disposal in the 200 west area active burial grounds

Description: An addendum was completed to the performance assessment (PA) analysis for the active 200 West Area low-level solid waste burial grounds. The addendum includes supplemental information developed during the review of the PA analysis, an ALARA analysis, a comparison of PA results with the Hanford Groundwater Protection Strategy, and a justification for the assumption of 500 year deterrence to the inadvertent intruder.
Date: December 20, 1996
Creator: Wood, M. I.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Estimated human health risks of disposing of nonhazardous oil field waste in salt caverns

Description: Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has completed an evaluation of the possibility that adverse human health effects (carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic) could result from exposure to contaminants released from nonhazardous oil field wastes (NOW) disposed in domal salt caverns. In this assessment, several steps were used to evaluate potential human health risks: identifying potential contaminants of concern, determining how humans could be exposed to these contaminants, assessing the contaminants` toxicities, estimating contaminant intakes, and, finally, calculating human cancer and noncancer risks.
Date: September 1, 1997
Creator: Tomasko, D.; Elcock, D. & Veil, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Intercomparison of simulation models for CO{sub 2} disposal in underground storage reservoirs

Description: An intercomparison study between simulation codes for terrestrial sequestration of CO{sub 2} is proposed. The objectives are, on the one hand, to focus and evaluate key processes through numerical simulation and, on the other, to explore the strengths of different codes and achieve acceptance of such codes for use in the development of geologic systems for CO{sub 2} disposal. This will be carried out through the study of a series of test problems by groups using their simulation codes. A progression from simple and uncoupled to increasingly complex and coupled problems is envisioned. The proposed study will attempt to involve interested technical groups worldwide, and will proceed through an iterative process of problem definition, solution comparison, discussion and refinement. The Internet will be used as a medium for communicating and organizing activities, and for a flexible exchange of information and documentation of results. In addition, it is planned to hold a series of workshops. The present write-up includes an initial set of eight proposed test problems and represents the first step in the process. Readers are encouraged to communicate with us at the email address above to indicate their interest and to provide suggestions and input.
Date: January 2001
Creator: Pruess, K.; Tsang, C. F.; Law, D. & Oldenburg, C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Risk analyses for disposing of nonhazardous oil field wastes in salt caverns

Description: Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has completed an evaluation of the possibility that adverse human health effects (carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic) could result from exposure to contaminants released from nonhazardous oil field wastes (NOW) disposed of in domal salt caverns. In this assessment, several steps were used to evaluate potential human health risks: identifying potential contaminants of concern; determining how humans could be exposed to these contaminants; assessing the contaminants` toxicities; estimating contaminant intakes; and, finally, calculating human cancer and noncancer risks. Potential human health risks associated with hazardous substances (arsenic, benzene, cadmium, and chromium) in NOW were assessed under four postclosure cavern release scenarios: inadvertent cavern intrusion, failure of the cavern seal, failure of the cavern through cracks or leaky interbeds, and a partial collapse of the cavern roof. To estimate potential human health risks for these scenarios, contaminant concentrations at the receptor were calculated using a one-dimensional solution to an advection/dispersion equation that included first order degradation. Even under worst-case conditions, the risks have been found to be within the US EPA target range for acceptable exposure levels. From a human health risk perspective, salt caverns can provide an acceptable disposal method for NOW.
Date: September 1, 1997
Creator: Tomasko, D.; Elcock, D. & Veil, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The 1996 performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

Description: The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is under development by the US Department of Energy (DOE) for the geologic disposal of transuranic (TRU) waste that has been generated at government defense installations in the United States. The WIPP is located in an area of low population density in southeastern New Mexico. Waste disposal will take place in excavated chambers in a bedded salt formation approximately 655 m below the land surface. This presentation describes a performance assessment (PA) carried out at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to support the Compliance Certification Application (CCA) made by the DOE to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in October, 1996, for the certification of the WIPP for the disposal of TRU waste. Based on the CCA supported by the PA described in this presentation, the EPA has issued a preliminary decision to certify the WIPP for the disposal of TRU waste. At present (April 1998), it appears likely that the WIPP will be in operation by the end of 1998.
Date: July 1, 1998
Creator: Anderson, D.R.; Jow, H.N.; Marietta, M.G.; Chu, M.S.Y.; Shephard, L.E.; Helton, J.C. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department