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Investigation of Turbocirculator for Target, a 1000-Mw(e) Reactor: Summary Report

Description: The present study was undertaken for the purpose of determining the feasibility, establishing the required development program, and estimating the cost of a turbocirculator to provide the pumping power for a 1000-Mw(e) high-temperature gas-cooled reactor power plant as part of the TARGET program. This necessitated preliminary design of the turbocirculator in conjunction with the reactor power plant as well as the investigation of methods for the optimization of the turbocirculator and for its development. This study was carried out in sufficient detail to fix the methods required to resolve the problems that would be encountered during the course of a prototype program resulting in a turbocirculator for the TARGET power plant.
Date: September 28, 1964
Creator: Yampolsky, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

DoE Advanced Ceramic Microturbine

Description: In July 2001, Ingersoll-Rand began work on this program. Its objective was to introduce ceramic hot section components into the IR family of microturbines to permit higher operating temperatures and hence improved efficiency. The IR microturbine product line combines a novel application of industrial turbocharger equipment, our commercially successful recuperator, and proven industrial gas turbine design practices. The objective of the joint development program is to combine the high production success of the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} turbocharger rotors, largely from Japan, with the IR turbocharger-based microturbines. The IR 'Ceramic Microturbine' (CMT) program has been configured to use the most practical ceramic rotor, considering size, geometry, proven manufacturing methods, and physical material limitations Performance predictions indicate that 36% LHV electric conversion efficiency could be attained at a Turbine Inlet Temperature (TIT) of nominally 1000 C. The initial 72kW engine is being designed to have comparable life and costs to our current product The package power rating is expandable to 100kW with this equipment by slightly increasing pressure ratio flow and TIT. This program was initially planned as five major tasks In Task 1 a comprehensive analysis of the state of the art ceramics and their applicability to microturbines was performed Milestone I was achieved with the joint DoE/IR decision to concentrate on our 70kW microturbine, with elevated turbine inlet temperature and pressure ratio,. This preserved the ability of the engine to utilize the standard IR recuperator and the majority of the microturbine subassemblies, A commercialization report, projecting the market size, was also completed as part of this task. Task 2's detailed design of the special hot-section components has been completed,. The two critical milestones, No.3 and No.4, associated with the detailed design of the monolithic silicon nitride turbine rotor and the release of the purchase order for this critical component were ...
Date: May 31, 2004
Creator: Systems, IR Energy
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Chemistry of the Thermal DeNOx Process: A Review of the Technology's Possible Application to control of NOx from Diesel Engines

Description: This paper presents a review of the Thermal DeNOx process with respect to its application to control of NOx emissions from diesel engines. The chemistry of the process is discussed first in empirical and then theoretical terms. Based on this discussion the possibilities of applying the process to controlling NOx emissions from diesel engines is considered. Two options are examined, modifying the requirements of the chemistry of the Thermal DeNOx process to suit the conditions provided by diesel engines and modifying the engines to provide the conditions required by the process chemistry. While the former examination did not reveal any promising opportunities, the latter did. Turbocharged diesel engine systems in which the turbocharger is a net producer of power seem capable of providing the conditions necessary for NOx reduction via the Thermal DeNOx reaction.
Date: August 5, 2001
Creator: Lyon, Richard
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Innovative Flash Control in Inertia Welding

Description: Inertia welding is widely used to join cylindrically shaped objects such as disks and shafts in turbine engines, turbochargers, etc. Flash control in many of these applications is not critical because the excess material is on external surfaces and can readily be removed by machining. Internal flash on hollow vessels, however, may be difficult or impossible to remove and may be either controlled by the use of flash traps or the part can be used as welded. Both internal flash and flash traps reduce internal volume and the conditions are not always acceptable. To address this short-coming, several innovative methods have been tested to determine their effect on flash control in inertia welding of hollow vessels. The methods include introduction of high pressure inert gas and incorporation of an expendable mandrel to divert the flash. Both gas and internal mandrels appear promising methods for diverting flash.
Date: April 25, 2003
Creator: Korinko, P.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Advanced Turbo-Charging Research and Development

Description: The objective of this project is to conduct analysis, design, procurement and test of a high pressure ratio, wide flow range, and high EGR system with two stages of turbocharging. The system needs to meet the stringent 2010MY emissions regulations at 20% + better fuel economy than its nearest gasoline competitor while allowing equivalent vehicle launch characteristics and higher torque capability than its nearest gasoline competitor. The system will also need to meet light truck/ SUV life requirements, which will require validation or development of components traditionally used only in passenger car applications. The conceived system is termed 'seriessequential turbocharger' because the turbocharger system operates in series at appropriate times and also sequentially when required. This is accomplished using intelligent design and control of flow passages and valves. Components of the seriessequential system will also be applicable to parallel-sequential systems which are also expected to be in use for future light truck/SUV applications.
Date: February 27, 2008
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Electrically-Assisted Turbocharger Development for Performance and Emissions

Description: Turbocharger transient lag inherently imposes a tradeoff between a robust engine response to transient load shifts and exhaust emissions. By itself, a well matched turbocharger for an engine has limited flexibility in improving this transient response. Electrically-assisted turbocharging has been seen as an attractive option to improve response and lower transient emissions. This paper presents the results of a multi-year joint CRADA between DDC and ORNL. Virtual lab diesel simulation models characterized the performance improvement potential of an electrically assisted turbocharger technology. Operating requirements to reduce transient duration between load shift time by up to 50% were determined. A turbomachine has been conceptualized with an integrated motor-generator, providing transient burst boost plus energy recovery capability. Numerous electric motor designs were considered, and a prototype motor was developed, fabricated, and is undergoing tests. Power controls have been designed and fabricated.
Date: August 20, 2000
Creator: Bailey, Milton
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE OPERATION OF THE EXISTING NATURAL GAS COMPRESSION INFRASTRUCTURE

Description: This quarterly report documents work performed under Tasks 10 through 14 of the project entitled: ''Technologies to Enhance Operation of the Existing Natural Gas Compression Infrastructure''. The project objective is to develop and substantiate methods for operating integral engine/compressors in gas pipeline service, which reduce fuel consumption, increase capacity, and enhance mechanical integrity. The report first documents tests performed on a KVG103 engine/compressor installed at Duke's Thomaston Compressor Station. This is the first series of tests performed on a four-stroke engine under this program. Additionally, this report presents results, which complete a comparison of performance before and after modification to install High Pressure Fuel Injection and a Turbocharger on a GMW10 at Williams Station 60. Quarterly Reports 7 and 8 already presented detailed data from tests before and after this modification, but the final quantitative comparison required some further analysis, which is presented in Section 5 of this report. The report further presents results of detailed geometrical measurements and flow bench testing performed on the cylinders and manifolds of the Laboratory Cooper GMVH6 engine being employed for two-stroke engine air balance investigations. These measurements are required to enhance the detailed accuracy in modeling the dynamic interaction of air manifold, exhaust manifold, and in-cylinder fuel-air balance.
Date: January 1, 2005
Creator: Smalley, Anthony J.; Harris, Ralph E.; Bourn, Gary D. & Deffenbaugh, Danny M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Cast CF8C-Plus Stainless Steel for Turbocharger Applications

Description: The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) project is to provide the critical test data needed to qualify CF8C-Plus cast stainless steel for commercial production and use for turbocharger housings with upgraded performance and durability relative to standard commercial cast irons or stainless steels. The turbocharger technologies include, but are not limited to, heavy-duty highway diesel engines, and passenger vehicle diesel and gasoline engines. This CRADA provides additional critical high-temperature mechanical properties testing and data analysis needed to quality the new CF8C-Plus steels for turbocharger housing applications.
Date: June 30, 2010
Creator: Maziasz, P.J.; Shyam, A.; Evans, N.D. & Pattabiraman, K. (Honeywell Turbo Technologies
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

APBF-DEC NOx Adsorber/DPF Project: SUV / Pick-up Truck Platform

Description: The objective of this project is to determine the influence of diesel fuel composition on the ability of NOX adsorber catalyst (NAC) technology, in conjunction with diesel particle filters (DPFs), to achieve stringent emissions levels with a minimal fuel economy impact. The test bed for this project was intended to be a light-duty sport utility vehicle (SUV) with a goal of achieving light-duty Tier 2-Bin 5 tail pipe emission levels (0.07 g/mi. NOX and 0.01 g/mi. PM). However, with the current US market share of light-duty diesel applications being so low, no US 2002 model year (MY) light-duty truck (LDT) or SUV platforms equipped with a diesel engine and having a gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) less than 8500 lb exist. While the current level of diesel engine use is relatively small in the light-duty class, there exists considerable potential for the diesel engine to gain a much larger market share in the future as manufacturers of heavy light-duty trucks (HLDTs) attempt to offset the negative impact on cooperate average fuel economy (CAFE) that the recent rise in market share of the SUVs and LDTs has caused. The US EPA Tier 2 emission standards also contain regulation to prevent the migration of heavy light-duty trucks and SUV's to the medium duty class. This preventive measure requires that all medium duty trucks, SUV's and vans in the 8,500 to 10,000 lb GVWR range being used as passenger vehicles, meet light-duty Tier 2 standards. In meeting the Tier 2 emission standards, the HLDTs and medium-duty passenger vehicles (MDPVs) will face the greatest technological challenges. Because the MDPV is the closest weight class and application relative to the potential upcoming HLDTs and SUV's, a weight class compromise was made in this program to allow the examination of using a diesel engine with a ...
Date: August 24, 2003
Creator: Webb, C.; Weber, P. & Thornton, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development of Low-Cost Austenitic Stainless Gas-Turbine and Diesel Engine Components with Enhanced High-Temperature Reliability

Description: In July of 1999, a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was undertaken between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Solar Turbines, Inc. and Caterpillar, Inc. (Caterpillar Technical Center) to evaluate commercial cast stainless steels for gas turbine engine and diesel engine exhaust component applications relative to the materials currently being used. If appropriate, the goal was to develop cast stainless steels with improved performance and reliability rather than switch to more costly cast Ni-based superalloys for upgraded performance. The gas-turbine components considered for the Mercury-50 engine were the combustor housing and end-cover, and the center-frame hot-plate, both made from commercial CF8C cast austenitic stainless steel (Fe-l9Cr-12Ni-Nb,C), which is generally limited to use at below 650 C. The advanced diesel engine components considered for truck applications (C10, C12, 3300 and 3400) were the exhaust manifold and turbocharger housing made from commercial high SiMo ductile cast iron with uses limited to 700-750 C or below. Shortly after the start of the CRADA, the turbine materials emphasis changed to wrought 347H stainless steel (hot-plate) and after some initial baseline tensile and creep testing, it was confirmed that this material was typical of those comprising the abundant database; and by 2000, the emphasis of the CRADA was primarily on diesel engine materials. For the diesel applications, commercial SiMo cast iron and standard cast CN12 austenitic stainless steel (Fe-25Cr-13Ni-Nb,C,N,S) baseline materials were obtained commercially. Tensile and creep testing from room temperature to 900 C showed the CN12 austenitic stainless steel to have far superior strength compared to SiMo cast iron above 550 C, together with outstanding oxidation resistance. However, aging at 850 C reduced room-temperature ductility of the standard CN12, and creep-rupture resistance at 850 C was less than expected, which triggered a focused laboratory-scale alloy development effort on modified cast austenitic stainless steels ...
Date: June 1, 2004
Creator: Maziasz, P.J.; Swindeman, R.W.; Browning, P.F. (Solar Turbines, Inc.); Frary, M.E. (Caterpillar, Inc.); Pollard, M.J.; Siebenaler, C.W. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Materials-Enabled High-Efficiency (MEHE) Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines

Description: The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between UTBattelle, Inc. and Caterpillar, Inc. was to improve diesel engine efficiency by incorporating advanced materials to enable higher combustion pressures and temperatures necessary for improved combustion. The project scope also included novel materials for use in advanced components and designs associated with waste-heat recovery and other concepts for improved thermal efficiency. Caterpillar initially provided ORNL with a 2004 Tier 2 C15 ACERT diesel engine (designed for on-highway use) and two 600 hp motoring dynamometers. The first year of the CRADA effort was focused on establishing a heavy-duty experimental engine research cell. First year activities included procuring, installing and commissioning the cell infrastructure. Infrastructure components consisted of intake air handling system, water tower, exhaust handling system, and cell air conditioning. Other necessary infrastructure items included the fuel delivery system and bottled gas handling to support the analytical instrumentation. The second year of the CRADA focused on commissioning the dynamometer system to enable engine experimentation. In addition to the requirements associated with the dynamometer controller, the electrical system needed a power factor correction system to maintain continuity with the electrical grid. During the second year the engine was instrumented and baseline operated to confirm performance and commission the dynamometer. The engine performance was mapped and modeled according to requirements provided by Caterpillar. This activity was further supported by a Work-for-Others project from Caterpillar to evaluate a proprietary modeling system. A second Work-for-Others activity was performed to evaluate a novel turbocharger design. This project was highly successful and may lead to new turbocharger designs for Caterpillar heavy-duty diesel engines. During the third (and final) year of the CRADA, a novel valve material was evaluated to assess high temperature performance and durability. A series of prototype valves, composed of a unique nickel-alloy was ...
Date: September 30, 2011
Creator: Kass, M. & Veliz, M. (Caterpillar, Inc.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Production of Diesel Engine Turbocharger Turbine from Low Cost Titanium Powder

Description: Turbochargers in commercial turbo-diesel engines are multi-material systems where usually the compressor rotor is made of aluminum or titanium based material and the turbine rotor is made of either a nickel based superalloy or titanium, designed to operate under the harsh exhaust gas conditions. The use of cast titanium in the turbine section has been used by Cummins Turbo Technologies since 1997. Having the benefit of a lower mass than the superalloy based turbines; higher turbine speeds in a more compact design can be achieved with titanium. In an effort to improve the cost model, and develop an industrial supply of titanium componentry that is more stable than the traditional aerospace based supply chain, the Contractor has developed component manufacturing schemes that use economical Armstrong titanium and titanium alloy powders and MgR-HDH powders. Those manufacturing schemes can be applied to compressor and turbine rotor components for diesel engine applications with the potential of providing a reliable supply of titanium componentry with a cost and performance advantage over cast titanium.
Date: May 4, 2012
Creator: Muth, T. R. & Mayer, R. (Queen City Forging)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development and Testing of a 6-Cylinder HCCI Engine for Distributed Generation

Description: This paper describes the technical approach for converting a Caterpillar 3406 natural gas spark ignited engine into HCCI mode. The paper describes all stages of the process, starting with a preliminary analysis that determined that the engine can be operated by preheating the intake air with a heat exchanger that recovers energy from the exhaust gases. This heat exchanger plays a dual role, since it is also used for starting the engine. For start-up, the heat exchanger is preheated with a natural gas burner. The engine is therefore started in HCCI mode, avoiding the need to handle the potentially difficult transition from SI or diesel mode to HCCI. The fueling system was modified by replacing the natural gas carburetor with a liquid petroleum gas (LPG) carburetor. This modification sets an upper limit for the equivalence ratio at {phi} {approx} 0.4, which is ideal for HCCI operation and guarantees that the engine will not fail due to knock. Equivalence ratio can be reduced below 0.4 for low load operation with an electronic control valve. Intake boosting has been a challenge, as commercially available turbochargers are not a good match for the engine, due to the low HCCI exhaust temperature. Commercial introduction of HCCI engines for stationary power will therefore require the development of turbochargers designed specifically for this mode of operation. Considering that no appropriate off-the-shelf turbocharger for HCCI engines exists at this time, we are investigating mechanical supercharging options, which will deliver the required boost pressure (3 bar absolute intake) at the expense of some reduction in the output power and efficiency. An appropriate turbocharger can later be installed for improved performance when it becomes available or when a custom turbocharger is developed. The engine is now running in HCCI mode and producing power in an essentially naturally aspirated mode. ...
Date: July 12, 2005
Creator: Flowers, D L; Martinez-Frias, J; Espinosa-Loza, F; Killingsworth, N; Aceves, S M; Dibble, R et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Garrett Electric Boosting Systems (EBS) Program

Description: Turbo diesel engine use in passenger cars in Europe has resulted in 30-50% improvement in fuel economy. Diesel engine application is particularly suitable for US because of vehicle size and duty cycle patterns. Adopting this technology for use in the US presents two issues--emissions and driveability. Emissions reduction technology is being well addressed with advanced turbocharging, fuel injection and catalytic aftertreatment systems One way to address driveability is to eliminate turbo lag and increase low speed torque. Electrically assisted turbocharging concepts incorporated in e-Turbo{trademark} designs do both The purpose of this project is to design and develop an electrically assisted turbocharger, e-Turbo{trademark}, for diesel engine use in the US. In this report, early design and development of electrical assist technology is described together with issues and potential benefits. In this early phase a mathematical model was developed and verified. The model was used in a sensitivity study. The results of the sensitivity study together with the design and test of first generation hardware was fed into second generation designs. In order to fully realize the benefits of electrical assist technology it was necessary to expand the scope of work to include technology on the compressor side as well as electronic controls concepts. The results of the expanded scope of work are also reported here. In the first instance, designs and hardware were developed for a small engine to quantify and demonstrate benefits. The turbo size was such that it could be applied in a bi-turbo configuration to an SUV sized V engine. Mathematical simulation was used to quantify the possible benefits in an SUV application. It is shown that low speed torque can be increased to get the high performance expected in US, automatic transmission vehicles. It is also shown that e-Turbo{trademark} can be used to generate modest amounts of ...
Date: March 31, 2005
Creator: Arnold, Steve; Balis, Craig; Barthelet, Pierre; Poix, Etienne; Samad, Tariq; Hampson, Greg et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

High Efficiency Engine Technologies Program

Description: Caterpillar's Product Development and Global Technology Division carried out a research program on waste heat recovery with support from DOE (Department of Energy) and the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory. The objective of the program was to develop a new air management and exhaust energy recovery system that would demonstrate a minimum 10% improvement in thermal efficiency over a base heavy-duty on-highway diesel truck engine. The base engine for this program was a 2007 C15 15.2L series-turbocharged on-highway truck engine with a LPL (low-pressure loop) exhaust recirculation system. The focus of the program was on the development of high efficiency turbomachinery and a high efficiency turbocompound waste heat recovery system. The focus of each area of development was as follows: (1) For turbine stages, the focus was on investigation and development of technologies that would improve on-engine exhaust energy utilization compared to the conventional radial turbines in widespread use today. (2) For compressor stages, the focus was on investigating compressor wheel design parameters beyond the range typically utilized in production, to determine the potential efficiency benefits thereof. (3) For turbocompound, the focus was on the development of a robust bearing system that would provide higher bearing efficiencies compared to systems used in turbocompound power turbines in production. None of the turbocharger technologies investigated involved addition of moving parts, actuators, or exotic materials, thereby increasing the likelihood of a favorable cost-value tradeoff for each technology. And the turbocompound system requires less hardware addition than competing bottoming cycle technologies, making it a more attractive solution from a cost and packaging standpoint. Main outcomes of the program are as follows: (1) Two turbine technologies that demonstrated up to 6% improvement in turbine efficiency on gas stand and 1-3% improvement in thermal efficiency in on-engine testing. (2) A compressor technology that demonstrated 1.5% improvement ...
Date: July 13, 2010
Creator: Kruiswyk, Rich
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Plasma Catalysis for NOx Reduction from Light-Duty Diesel Vehicles

Description: On behalf of the Department of Energy's Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies, we are pleased to introduce the Fiscal Year (FY) 2004 Annual Progress Report for the Advanced Combustion Engine R&D Sub-Program. The mission of the FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program is to develop more energy efficient and environmentally friendly highway transportation technologies that enable Americans to use less petroleum for their vehicles. The Advanced Combustion Engine R&D Sub-Program supports this mission by removing the critical technical barriers to commercialization of advanced internal combustion engines for light-, medium-, and heavy-duty highway vehicles that meet future Federal and state emissions regulations. The primary objective of the Advanced Combustion Engine R&D Sub-Program is to improve the brake thermal efficiency of internal combustion engines from 30 to 45 percent for light-duty applications by 2010; and 40 to 55 percent for heavy-duty applications by 2012; while meeting cost, durability, and emissions constraints. R&D activities include work on combustion technologies that increase efficiency and minimize in-cylinder formation of emissions, as well as aftertreatment technologies that further reduce exhaust emissions. Work is also being conducted on ways to reduce parasitic and heat transfer losses through the development and application of thermoelectrics and turbochargers that include electricity generating capability, and conversion of mechanically driven engine components to be driven via electric motors. This introduction serves to outline the nature, current progress, and future directions of the Advanced Combustion Engine R&D Sub-Program. The research activities of this Sub-Program are planned in conjunction with the FreedomCAR Partnership and the 21st Century Truck Partnership and are carried out in collaboration with industry, national laboratories, and universities. Because of the importance of clean fuels in achieving low emissions, R&D activities are closely coordinated with the relevant activities of the Fuel Technologies Sub-Program, also within the Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle ...
Date: December 15, 2005
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Lean-burn hydrogen spark-ignited engines: the mechanical equivalent to the fuel cell

Description: Fuel cells are considered as the ideal power source for future vehicles, due to their high efficiency and low emissions. However, extensive use of fuel cells in light-duty vehicles is likely to be years away, due to their high manufacturing cost. Hydrogen-fueled, spark-ignited, homogeneous-charge engines offer a near-term alternative to fuel cells. Hydrogen in a spark-ignited engine can be burned at very low equivalence ratios, so that NO[sub x] emissions can be reduced to less than 10 ppm without catalyst. HC and CO emissions may result from oxidation of engine oil, but by proper design are negligible (a few ppm). Lean operation also results in increased indicated efficiency due to the thermodynamic properties of the gaseous mixture contained in the cylinder. The high effective octane number of hydrogen allows the use of a high compression ratio, further increasing engine efficiency. In this paper, a simplified engine model is used for predicting hydrogen engine efficiency and emissions. The model uses basic thermodynamic equations for the compression and expansion processes, along with an empirical correlation for heat transfer, to predict engine indicated efficiency. A friction correlation and a supercharger/turbocharger model are then used to calculate brake thermal efficiency. The model is validated with many 1345 experimental points obtained in a recent evaluation of a hydrogen research engine. The experimental data are used to adjust the empirical constants in the heat release rate and heat transfer correlation. The adjusted engine model predicts pressure traces, indicated efficiency and NO,, emissions with good accuracy over the range of speed, equivalence ratio and manifold pressure experimentally covered.
Date: October 1, 1996
Creator: Aceves, S.M. & Smith, J.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

21st Century Locomotive Technology: Quarterly Technical Status Report 6 DOE/AL68284-TSR06

Description: Experimental work to map the performance of the High Pressure Common Rail (HPCR) system on a locomotive is in progress. The experimental trends agree with KIVA modeling predictions. Injection optimization is in progress. Electrically-assisted turbocharger modeling was used to study passenger locomotive performance improvements. Energy storage cycling life testing began, and an improved battery state algorithm was determined. The hybrid locomotive energy storage was prepared for energy management system algorithm testing. Progress in reliable methods for computing optimal driving plans, and methods to reduce the complexity of the necessary optimization are reported.
Date: August 31, 2004
Creator: Salasoo, Lembit; Topinka, Jennifer & Houpt, Paul K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development of the next generation medium-duty natural gas engine

Description: This report summarizes the work done under this subcontract in the areas of System Design, System Fabrication, and Experimental Program. The report contains the details of the engine development process for achieving throttleless stratified charge spark ignition (SI) engine operation as well as advanced turbocharging strategies. Engine test results showing the potential of the direct-injection stratified charge combustion strategy for increasing part-load engine efficiency on a John Deere 8.1-liter natural gas engine are also included in this report. In addition, steady state and step transient engine data are presented that quantify the performance of a variable geometry turbocharger (VGT) as well as a modified waste-gated turbocharger on the engine. The benefits of the technologies investigated during this project will be realized in the form of increased drive-cycle efficiency to diesel-like levels, while retaining the low emissions characteristics of a lean-burn natural gas engine.
Date: February 28, 2000
Creator: Podnar, D.J. & Kubesh, J.T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Diesel Engine Waste Heat Recovery Utilizing Electric Turbocompound Technology

Description: Caterpillar's Technology & Solutions Division conceived, designed, built and tested an electric turbocompound system for an on-highway heavy-duty truck engine. The heart of the system is a unique turbochargerr with an electric motor/generator mounted on the shaft between turbine and compressor wheels. When the power produced by the turbocharger turbine exceeds the power of the compressor, the excess power is converted to electrical power by the generator on the turbo shaft; that power is then used to help turn the crankshaft via an electric motor mounted in the engine flywheel housing. The net result is an improvement in engine fuel economy. The electric turbocompound system provides added control flexibility because it is capable of varying the amount of power extracted from the exhaust gases, thus allowing for control of engine boost. The system configuration and design, turbocharger features, control system development, and test results are presented.
Date: July 5, 2005
Creator: Hopman, Ulrich & Kruiswyk, Richard W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Electric Boosting System for Light Truck/SUV Application

Description: Turbo diesel engine use in passenger cars in Europe has resulted in 30-50% improvement in fuel economy. Diesel engine application is particularly suitable for US because of vehicle size and duty cycle patterns. Adopting this technology for use in the US presents two issues--emissions and driveability. Emissions reduction technology is being well addressed with advanced turbocharging, fuel injection and catalytic aftertreatment systems. One way to address driveability is to eliminate turbo lag and increase low speed torque. Electrically assisted turbocharging concepts incorporated in e-TurboTM designs do both. The purpose of this project is to design and develop an electrically assisted turbocharger, e-TurboTM, for diesel engine use in the US. In this report, early design and development of electrical assist technology is described together with issues and potential benefits. In this early phase a mathematical model was developed and verified. The model was used in a sensitivity study. The results of the sensitivity study together with the design and test of first generation hardware was fed into second generation designs. In order to fully realize the benefits of electrical assist technology it was necessary to expand the scope of work to include technology on the compressor side as well as electronic controls concepts. The results of the expanded scope of work are also reported here. In the first instance, designs and hardware were developed for a small engine to quantify and demonstrate benefits. The turbo size was such that it could be applied in a bi-turbo configuration to an SUV sized V engine. Mathematical simulation was used to quantify the possible benefits in an SUV application. It is shown that low speed torque can be increased to get the high performance expected in US, automatic transmission vehicles. It is also shown that e-TurboTM can be used to generate modest amounts of ...
Date: June 22, 2005
Creator: Steve Arnold, Craig Balis, Pierre Barthelet, Etienne Poix, Tariq Samad, Greg Hampson, S.M. Shahed
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The cost of silicon nitride powder: What must it be to compete

Description: The ability of advanced ceramic components to compete with similar metallic parts will depend in part on current and future efforts to reduce the cost of ceramic parts. This paper examines the potential reductions in part cost that could result from the development of less expensive advanced ceramic powders. The analysis focuses specifically on two silicon nitride engine components -- roller followers and turbocharger rotors. The results of the process-cost models developed for this work suggest that reductions in the cost of advanced silicon nitride powder from its current level of about $20 per pound to about $5 per pound will not in itself be sufficient to lower the cost of ceramic parts below the current cost of similar metallic components. This work also examines if combinations of lower-cost powders and further improvements in other key technical parameters to which costs are most sensitive could push the cost of ceramics below the cost of metallics. Although these sensitivity analyses are reflective of technical improvements that are very optimistic, the resulting part costs are estimated to remain higher than similar metallic parts. Our findings call into question the widely-held notion that the cost of ceramic components must not exceed the cost of similar metallic parts if ceramics are to be competitive. Economic viability will ultimately be decided not on the basis of which part is less costly, but on an assessment of the marginal costs and benefits provided by ceramics and metallics. This analysis does not consider the benefits side of the equation. Our findings on the cost side of the equation suggest that the competitiveness of advanced ceramics will ultimately be decided by our ability to evaluate and communicate the higher benefits that advanced ceramic parts may offer.
Date: February 1, 1992
Creator: Das, S. & Curlee, T.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department