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Philipp Jakob Rittler Sonata à 18

Description: Philipp Jakob Rittler (composer ca. 1637-1690) - Play streams in full ... Sonata a 18, for 6 trumpets, 3 trombones, 2 violins, 3 violas, timpani and continuo ...
Access: This item is restricted to UNT Community Members. Login required if off-campus.
Date: 2013
Creator: Rittler, Philipp Jakob & Bland, Justin
Partner: UNT Libraries

Johann Heinrich Schmelzer Sonata à 3

Description: Philipp Jakob Rittler (composer ca. 1637-1690) - Play streams in full ... Sonata a 17, for 6 trumpets, 3 trombones, 2 violins, 3 violas, timpani and continuo ...
Access: This item is restricted to UNT Community Members. Login required if off-campus.
Date: 2007
Creator: Schmelzer, Johann Heinrich & Bauguess, Barry
Partner: UNT Libraries

Philipp Jakob Rittler Sonata à 17

Description: Philipp Jakob Rittler (composer ca. 1637-1690) - Play streams in full ... Sonata a 17, for 6 trumpets, 3 trombones, 2 violins, 3 violas, timpani and continuo ...
Access: This item is restricted to UNT Community Members. Login required if off-campus.
Date: 2013
Creator: Rittler, Philipp Jakob & Bland, Justin
Partner: UNT Libraries

Trombe Walls in Low-Energy Buildings: Practical Experiences; Preprint

Description: Low-energy buildings today improve on passive solar design by incorporating a thermal storage and delivery system called a Trombe wall. Trombe walls were integrated into the envelope of a recently completed Visitor Center at Zion National Park and a site entrance building at the National Wind Technology Center located at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. NREL helped to design these commercial buildings to minimize energy consumption, using Trombe walls as an integral part of their design.
Date: July 1, 2004
Creator: Torcellini, P. & Pless, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Performance of a selective-surface trombe wall in a small commercial building

Description: The design and construction of a 100% passive solar building utilizing a clerestory and a trombe wall are described. The use of three selectively absorptive and emissive coverings on the trombe wall outer surface are investigated. One of the coverings and its laminating adhesive are tested for degradation after a year of exposure under normal operating conditions. Ambient temperature, room air temperature, trombe wall interior and exterior surface temperatures, and solar radiation are measured.
Date: March 1, 1981
Creator: Judkoff, R. & Sokol, F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Integration of Low Energy Technologies for Optimal Building and Space Conditioning Design

Description: EnergyPlus is the DOE's newest building energy simulation engine. It was developed specifically to support the design of low energy building systems. This project focused on developing new low energy building simulation models for EnergyPlus, verifying and validating new and existing EnergyPlus models and transferring the new technology to the private sector. The project focused primarily on geothermal and radiant technologies, which are related by the fact that both are based on hydronic system design. As a result of this project eight peer reviewed journal and conference papers were added to the archival literature and five technical reports were published as M.S. theses and are available in the archival literature. In addition, several reports, including a trombe wall validation report were written for web publication. Thirteen new or significantly enhanced modules were added to the EnergyPlus source code and forty-two new or significantly enhanced sections were added to the EnergyPlus documentation as a result of this work. A low energy design guide was also developed as a pedagogical tool and is available for web publication. Finally several tools including a hybrid ground source heat pump optimization program and a geothermal heat pump parameter estimation tool were developed for research and design and are available for web publication.
Date: January 7, 2006
Creator: Fisher, D.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Highlighting High Performance: National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Visitors Center, Golden, Colorado

Description: The National Renewable Energy Laboratory Visitors Center, also known as the Dan Schaefer Federal Building, is a high-performance building located in Golden, Colorado. The 6,400-square-foot building incorporates passive solar heating, energy-efficient lighting, an evaporative cooling system, and other technologies to minimize energy costs and environmental impact. The Visitors Center displays a variety of interactive exhibits on energy efficiency and renewable energy, and the building includes an auditorium, a public reading room, and office space.
Date: June 19, 2001
Creator: Burgert, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Thermal Control System and Method for a Passive Solar Storage Wall

Description: A system and method are provided for controlling the storing and release of thermal energy from a thermal storage wall wherein said wall is capable of storing thermal energy from insolation. The system and method includes a device such as a plurality of louvers spaced a predetermined distance from the thermal wall for regulating the release of thermal energy from the thermal wall. This regulating device is made from a material which is substantially transparent to the incoming solar radiation so that when it is in any operative position, the thermal storage wall substantially receives all of the impacting solar radiation. The material in the regulating device is further capable of being substantially opaque to thermal energy so that when the device is substantially closed, thermal release of energy from the storage wall is substantially minimized. An adjustment device is interconnected with the regulating mechanism for selectively opening and closing it in order to regulate the release of thermal energy from the wall.
Date: July 10, 1981
Creator: Ortega, Joseph Kenneth Earl
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Performance analysis of mixed passive solar heating systems

Description: The various situations in which interactions between south-facing systems serving a single thermal zone may affect the performance of the mixture are discussed. In particular, the nature of direct gain interactions with unvented Trombe walls was explored using a detailed thermal network computer program. The results are compared with predictions from the simple design analysis procedures which neglect interactions. This comparison showed that system interactions can significantly improve the peformance of a mixture under certain conditions.
Date: January 1, 1985
Creator: Wray, W.O. & Best, E.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Phase Change Materials in Floor Tiles for Thermal Energy Storage

Description: Passive solar systems integrated into residential structures significantly reduce heating energy consumption. Taking advantage of latent heat storage has further increased energy savings. This is accomplished by the incorporation of phase change materials into building materials used in passive applications. Trombe walls, ceilings and floors can all be enhanced with phase change materials. Increasing the thermal storage of floor tile by the addition of encapsulated paraffin wax is the proposed topic of research. Latent heat storage of a phase change material (PCM) is obtained during a change in phase. Typical materials use the latent heat released when the material changes from a liquid to a solid. Paraffin wax and salt hydrates are examples of such materials. Other PCMs that have been recently investigated undergo a phase transition from one solid form to another. During this process they will release heat. These are known as solid-state phase change materials. All have large latent heats, which makes them ideal for passive solar applications. Easy incorporation into various building materials is must for these materials. This proposal will address the advantages and disadvantages of using these materials in floor tile. Prototype tile will be made from a mixture of quartz, binder and phase change material. The thermal and structural properties of the prototype tiles will be tested fully. It is expected that with the addition of the phase change material the structural properties will be compromised to some extent. The ratio of phase change material in the tile will have to be varied to determine the best mixture to provide significant thermal storage, while maintaining structural properties that meet the industry standards for floor tile.
Date: October 1, 2002
Creator: Hittle, Douglas C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Highlighting High Performance: The Solar Energy Research Facility, Golden, Colorado

Description: The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Energy Research Facility in Golden, Colorado, uses a stair-step configuration to allow daylight and heat into the office areas, while the laboratories in the back of the building are in a more controlled environment where tight levels of ventilation, humidity, temperature, and light are critical. A unique mechanical system makes the most of the natural environment and the building's design to efficiently heat and cool the building at an annual utility bill savings of almost $200,000 per year.
Date: June 26, 2001
Creator: Torcellini, P. & Epstein, K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Bridgeview Park facility solar retrofit

Description: The weatherization and insulation of a presently unheated frame park building and the installation of a Trombe wall on the south side of the structure for passive solar heating are planned. The major objectives of the project are to increase the exposure of local residents and visitors to passive solar technology and to demonstrate the applicability of passive solar technology to residential, commercial and recreational buildings. Some changes in the original plans are discussed. Five blueprints illustrate the planned improvements. (LEW)
Date: January 1, 1981
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Free convective laminar flow within the Trombe wall channel

Description: Free convective laminar heat transfer between the channel surfaces of the Trombe wall has been investigated. This study considered the velocity profiles normal and parallel to the direction of fluid flow, the pressure drop due to flow acceleration at the channel entrance, and the effect of a variety of dissimilar but uniform channel surface temperatures for a wide range of flow rates. A finite difference procedure was used to solve the governing equations in dimensionless form using air as the fluid. After comparison with available experimental data, results have been reduced, and several correlations developed to enable important performance characteristics to be estimated given the channel thickness, height, and surface temperatures.
Date: August 1, 1978
Creator: Akbari, H. & Borgers, T.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Simple empirical method for estimating the performance of a passive solar heated building of the thermal storage wall type

Description: Two methods are presented for estimating the annual solar heating performance of a building utilizing a passive thermal storage wall of the Trombe wall or water wall type with or without night insulation and with or without a reflector. The method is accurate to +-3% as compared with hour-by-hour computer simulations.
Date: January 1, 1978
Creator: Balcomb, J.D. & McFarland, R.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Passive-solar construction handbook

Description: Many of the basic elements of passive solar design are reviewed. Passive solar construction is covered according to system type, each system type discussion including a general discussion of the important design and construction issues which apply to the particular system and case studies illustrating designed and built examples of the system type. The three basic types of passive solar systems discussed are direct gain, thermal storage wall, and attached sunspace. Thermal performance and construction information is presented for typical materials used in passive solar collector components, storage components, and control components. Appended are an overview of analysis methods and a technique for estimating performance. (LEW)
Date: February 1, 1981
Creator: Levy, E.; Evans, D. & Gardstein, C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Passive-solar techniques for the mobile/modular housing industry

Description: Using a fairly typical mobile home design, it is shown that state-of-the-art mobile/modular housing and passive solar techniques can be used together. Computer simulations are used to analyze the concept. Size conditions at a mobile home park are considered. Glazing orientation, shading, and thermal storage are included in the analysis. (LEW)
Date: January 31, 1983
Creator: Osborn, D.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Experimental study of a fiber absorber-suppressor modified Trombe wall

Description: An experimental study has been conducted to ascertain the effects of introducing fiber bed absorbers on Trombe wall passive solar collectors. Two identical, Trombe wall passive solar units were constructed that incorporate the basic components of masonry collector-storage walls: glazings, masonry and thermal insulation. Both units were extensively instrumented with thermocouples and heat flux transducers. Ambient temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and insolation are also measured. In the first part of the study the two Trombe wall units were tested with a single glass cover. The thermal performance of both units was found to be virtually identical. In the second part of the study a single cover Trombe wall unit was compared with a double cover unit and the latter was found to have higher air gap and masonry wall temperatures and heat fluxes. In the final phase of the experiment, an absorbing, scattering and emitting fiberglass-like material was placed in the air gap of the single gazed wall. Tests were conducted to compare the solar-thermal performance, heat loss and gain characteristics between the units with and without the fiber absorber-suppressor. This experiment showed that the fiber bed served to decouple the wall at night from its exterior environment and to reduce the heat losses. The modified Trombe wall with the fiber absorber-suppressor out-performed the double glazed Trombe wall system by approximately ten percent gain in useable thermal energy. Also, the fiber bed eliminates one glazing thereby reducing system cost as well.
Date: December 1, 1982
Creator: Choudhury, D & Birkebak, R C
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Residential passive solar systems: regional sensitivity to system performance costs, and alternative prices

Description: The economic potential of two passive space heating configurations are analyzed. These are a masonry thermal storage wall (Trombe) and a direct gain system - both with night insulation. A standard tract home design for each of the two passive systems is being used throughout the analysis to allow interregional comparisons. The economic performance of these two systems is evaluated on a regional basis (223 locations) throughout the United States. For each of the two conventional energy types considered (electricity and natural gas), sensitivity analysis is conducted to determine the impact of alternative fuel price escalation rates and solar costs upon feasibility of the two solar systems. Cost goals for solar system prices are established under one set of future fuel prices and stated economic conditions. (MOW)
Date: January 1, 1979
Creator: Kirschner, C.; Ben-David, S. & Roach, F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Simple procedure for schematic design of passive solar buildings

Description: A simple procedure for use during the schematic phase of passive solar building design is presented in this article. The procedure is quantitative and accurate enough to insure that designs based on the provided starting point values of the primary building parameters will be cost effective.
Date: January 1, 1984
Creator: Wray, W.O. & Kosiewicz, C.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

SOLCOST-PASSIVE solar energy design program: User's Guide

Description: The SOLCOST-PASSIVE solar energy design program is a public domain interactive computer design tool intended for use by non-thermal specialists to size passive solar systems with a methodology based on the Los Alamos Solar Load Ratio method. A life cycle savings analysis is included in the program. An overview of SOLCOST-PASSIVE capabilities and the Solar Load Ratio method which it is based on is presented. A detailed guide to the SOLCOST-PASSIVE input parameters is given. Sample problems showing typical execution sessions and the resulting SOLCOST-PASSIVE output are included. Appendices A thru D provide details on the SLR method and the life cycle savings methodology of SOLCOST-PASSIVE. (MHR)
Date: September 1, 1980
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

NCSU solar energy and conservation house. Final report

Description: A passive solar energy house has been built adjacent to the NCSU McKimmon Continuing Education Center. The house contains a two-story embedded sunspace, two Trombe walls, active solar hot water heating, thermal storage in a rock filled ceiling/floor, and numerous research treatments, and energy conservation features. (See attached photo brochure; Appendix 1). The house is completely decorated and furnished in an attractive manner and the exterior architecture is traditional and has broad consumer appeal. It is also thoroughly instrumented to monitor performance. The house is open to the public on weekends and numerous people come to visit on their own initiative and others take advantage of the close proximity to McKimmon while there attending conferences. The house will influence and motivate large numbers of people to consider solar and energy conservation facets in their homes and will provide data to substantiate performance to prospective home buyers and meaningful data on design and construction for builders.
Date: October 1, 1981
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Trombe wall vs direct gain: a comparative analysis of passive solar heating systems

Description: Until recently only the thermal storage wall passive solar heating system had been characterized by thermal network calculators using hour-by-hour historical weather data. The greater popularity and market acceptability of direct gain systems has led to a lively, but inconclusive debate concerning the relative effectiveness of the two configurations. The recent development and validation of PASOLE/SUNSPOT, a thermal network code for direct gain enclosures, has provided the tool necessary for a quantitative comparison. The results of performance analysis calculations for both Trombe wall and direct gain systems in Albuquerque, New Mexico, and Madison, Wisconsin, are reported. The comparative analysis includes parametric variation of fundamental design parameters including building load, glazing area, total mass, mass thickness, number of glazings, night insulation value and allowable temperature swing. Thermal comfort within the two generic types of buildings is considered as well as energy efficient performance.
Date: January 1, 1979
Creator: Wray, W.O. & Balcomb, J.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Comparative economics of passive and active systems

Description: As the interest in solar energy applications for residential space heating grows, it becomes imperative to evaluate the economic performance of alternative designs. One passive design is concentrated on--the thermal mass storage wall. The economic performance of this design is examined and subsequently contrasted with one active design--the air collector/rock storage system. Architectural design criteria, solar performance characteristics, and the incremental solar cost of each design is briefly reviewed. Projections of conventional energy prices are discussed, along with the optimal sizing/feasibility criterion employed in the economic performance analysis. In addition, the effects of two incentive proposals--income tax credits and low interest loans--upon each design are examined. Results are reported on a state-by-state basis for the U.S., with major conclusions summarized for each design. It is generally the case that incentives greatly enhance the economics of both system designs, although the contrast is greater for the passive design. Also, against the less expensive conventional fuels (natural gas and heating oil) the passive design was shown to offer a more cost effective alternative than the active system for most states.
Date: January 1, 1978
Creator: Roach, F.; Noll, S. & Ben-David, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department