1,364 Matching Results

Search Results

Advanced search parameters have been applied.

Monitoring and data analysis for the Vadose Zone Monitoring System (VZMS), McClellan AFB. Quarterly status report, August 15, 1997--November 15, 1997

Description: This report contains information on field and laboratory work performed between August 15th and November 15th at site S-7 in IC 34, at McClellan AFB. At this location, a Vadose Zone Monitoring System (VZMS) (LBNL, 1996) is currently being used to collect subsurface data including hydraulic potential, soil gas pressure, moisture content, water chemistry, gas chemistry, and temperature.
Date: December 5, 1997
Creator: Zawislanski, P.T.; Mountford, H.S.; Dahlquist, R.; Rodriguez, S.J. & Salve, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Non-linear evolution of double tearing modes in tokamaks

Description: The delta prime formalism with neoclassical modifications has proven to be a useful tool in the study of tearing modes in high beta, collisionless plasmas. In this paper the formalism developed for the inclusion of neoclassical effects on tearing modes in monotonic q-profile plasmas is extended to plasmas with hollow current profiles and double rational surfaces. First, the classical formalism of tearing modes in the Rutherford regime in low beta plasmas is extended to q profiles with two rational surfaces. Then it is shown that this formalism is readily extended to include neoclassical effects.
Date: December 17, 1999
Creator: Fredrickson, E.; Bell, M.; Budny, R.V. & Synakowski, E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Geophysical interpretations west of and within the northwestern part of the Nevada Test Site

Description: This report focuses on interpretation of gravity and new magnetic data west of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and within the northwestern part of NTS. The interpretations integrate the gravity and magnetic data with other geophysical, geological, and rock property data to put constraints on tectonic and magmatic features not exposed at the surface. West of NTS, where drill hole information is absent, these geophysical data provide the best available information on the subsurface. Interpreted subsurface features include calderas, intrusions, basalt flows and volcanoes, Tertiary basins, structurally high pre-Tertiary rocks, and fault zones. New features revealed by this study include (1) a north-south buried tectonic fault east of Oasis Mountain, which the authors call the Hogback fault; (2) an east striking fault or accommodation zone along the south side of Oasis Valley basin, which they call the Hot Springs fault; (3) a NNE striking structural zone coinciding with the western margins of the caldera complexes; (4) regional magnetic highs that probably represent a thick sequence of Tertiary volcanic rocks; and (5) two probable buried calderas that may be related to the tuffs of Tolicha Peak and of Sleeping Butte, respectively.
Date: December 31, 1997
Creator: Grauch, V.J.; Sawyer, D.A.; Fridrich, C.J. & Hudson, M.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A Very Approximate Theory for Gas Transport in a Polymer Foam

Description: The author is involved with a project that requires calculation of the flow of gas through thin sheets of a flexible polymer foam. Essentially, the foam is a collection of interconnected spherical holes in the polymer matrix. When the material is made, its porosity is in the range of 60-70%. Initially, the sheets are roughly a millimeter thick. In the application, the sheets are compressed between solid surfaces so that their thickness is reduced to approximately 50-75% of the original (thereby reducing the porosity to as low as 20%). The project requires calculating gas transport in the longitudinal direction (in other words, parallel to the thin section of the sheets and perpendicular to the direction of compression). The transport calculations must be done in three different flow regimes. First, with gas pressures high enough so that the gas in the pores is in the continuum regime and thus the transport is governed by the usual equations for flow of a compressible gas in a porous medium. Second, with gas pressures low enough so that the flow is in the free molecular region. In the third regime, the foam is filled with a carrier gas (with pressure high enough to be in continuum) and the flow of interest is that of a small amount of an additional gas. In this third regime, the driving force is diffusion of the trace gas in the carrier.
Date: December 1, 1999
Creator: Kirkpatrick, J.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Quarterly report, August 1--October 31, 1997

Description: The objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate two technologies for the placement of coal combustion by-products in abandoned underground coal mines, and to assess the environmental impact of these technologies for the management of CCB materials. The two technologies for the underground placement that were to be developed and demonstrated are: (1) pneumatic placement using virtually dry CCB products, and (2) hydraulic placement using a paste mixture of CCB products with about 70% solids. The period covered by this report is the second quarter of Phase 3 of the overall program. During this period over 8,000 tons of CCB mixtures was injected using the hydraulic paste technology. This amount of material virtually filled the underground opening around the injection well, and was deemed sufficient to demonstrate fully the hydraulic injection technology. By the end of this quarter about 2,000 tons of fly ash had been placed underground using the pneumatic placement technology. While the rate of injection of about 50 tons per hour met design criteria, problems were experienced in the delivery of fly ash to the pneumatic demonstration site. The source of the fly ash, the Archer Daniels Midland Company power plant at Decatur, Illinois is some distance from the demonstration site, and often sufficient tanker trucks are not available to haul enough fly ash to fully load the injection equipment. Further, on some occasions fly ash from the plant was not available. The injection well was plugged three times during the demonstration. This typically occurred due to cementation of the FBC ash in contact with water. After considerable deliberations and in consultation with the technical project officer, it was decided to stop further injection of CCB`s underground using the developed pneumatic technology.
Date: December 31, 1997
Creator: Chugh, Y.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory institutional plan -- FY 2000--2004

Description: In this first institutional plan prepared by Bechtel BWXT Idaho, LLC, for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, the INEEL will focus its efforts on three strategic thrusts: (1) Environmental Management stewardship for DOE-EM, (2) Nuclear reactor technology for DOE-Nuclear Energy (NE), and (3) Energy R and D, demonstration, and deployment (initial focus on biofuels and chemicals from biomass). The first strategic thrust focuses on meeting DOE-EMs environmental cleanup and long-term stewardship needs in a manner that is safe, cost-effective, science-based, and approved by key stakeholders. The science base at the INEEL will be further used to address a grand challenge for the INEEL and the DOE complex--the development of a fundamental scientific understanding of the migration of subsurface contaminants. The second strategic thrust is directed at DOE-NEs needs for safe, economical, waste-minimized, and proliferation-resistant nuclear technologies. As NE lead laboratories, the INEEL and ANL will pursue specific priorities. The third strategic thrust focuses on DOE's needs for clean, efficient, and renewable energy technology. As an initial effort, the INEEL will enhance its capability in biofuels, bioprocessing, and biochemicals. The content of this institutional plan is designed to meet basic DOE requirements for content and structure and reflect the key INEEL strategic thrusts. Updates to this institutional plan will offer additional content and resource refinements.
Date: December 1, 1999
Creator: Enge, R.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

BUGLE-96 validation with MORSE-SGC/S using water and iron experiments from SINBAD 97

Description: This document summarizes the validation of MORSE-SGC/S with the BUGLE-96 cross section library. SINBAD Benchmark Experiment 2.004, Winfrith Water Benchmark Experiment and SBE 6.001, Karlsruhe Iron Sphere Benchmark Experiment were utilized for this validation. The MORESE-SGC/S code with the BUGLE-96 cross-section library was used to model the experimental configurations as given in SINDBAD 97. SINDBAD is a shielding integral benchmark archive and database developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). For means of comparison, the experimental models were also executed with MORSE-SGC/S using the BUGLE-80 cross-section library. BUGLE-96 cross section will be used for shielding applications only as recommended by ORNL.
Date: December 3, 1999
Creator: Blanchard, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Transport of soluble species through tuff core

Description: This letter report presents and summarizes the results of flow and tracer tests using a core sample of Topopah Spring tuff containing a saw-cut fracture. A dilute Na-Cl-HCO{sub 3} solution containing Br{sup -} or I{sup -} tracer was eluted through the core under constant flow conditions (0.1, 0.2, 2.0 mL/h) and at three temperatures (23, 59, 92 {degrees}C). A more complete analysis of these data and the implications of these results for transport of soluble species in the Topopah Spring tuff in the Near Field Environment (NFE) will be reported in the synthesis on Integrated Testing activities to be included in the NFE report.
Date: December 1, 1997
Creator: Viani, B.E. & Carman, L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Forage Harvest and Transport Costs

Description: An engineering-economic approach is used to calculate harvest, in-field transport, and over-the-road transport costs for hay as bales and modules, silage, and crop residues as bales and modules. Costs included are equipment depreciation interest; fuel, lube, and oil; repairs; insurance, housing, and taxes; and labor. Field preparation, pest control, fertilizer, land, and overhead are excluded from the costs calculated Equipment is constrained by power available, throughput or carrying capacity, and field speed.
Date: December 1, 1998
Creator: Butler, J.; Downing, M. & Turhollow, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

24 m meteorological tower data report period: January through December, 1995

Description: This report was prepared by the Desert Research Institute (DRI) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). It summarizes meteorological data collected at the 24 meter tower at the Nevada Test Site Hazardous Material Spill Center (HAZMAT) located at Frenchman Flat near Mercury, Nevada, approximately 75 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The tower was originally installed in July, 1993 to characterize baseline conditions for an EPA sponsored experimental research program at the HAZMAT. A previous report reported monitoring results for 1994. This report presents results of the monitoring for January--December, 1995, providing: a status of the measurement systems (including any quality assurance activities) during the report period and a summary of the meteorological conditions at the HAZMAT during the report period. The scope of the report is limited to summary data analyses and does not include extensive meteorological analysis. The tower was instrumented at 8 levels. Wind speed, wind direction, and temperature were measured at all 8 levels. Relative humidity was measured at 3 levels. Solar and net radiation were measured at 2 meters above the ground. Barometric pressure was measured at the base of the tower and soil temperature was measured near the base of the tower.
Date: December 1, 1997
Creator: Freeman, D.; Bowen, J.B.; Egami, R.; Coulombe, W.; Crow, D.; Cristani, B. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Great Basin Paleoenvironmental Studies Project: Technical progress report, Second quarter (Year 2), September--December 1994

Description: The paleobiotic and geomorphic records are being examined for the local and regional impact of past climates to assess Yucca Mountain`s suitability as a high-level nuclear waste repository. In particular these data are being used to provide estimates of the timing, duration and extremes of past periods of moister climate for use in hydrological models of local and regional recharge that are being formulated by USGS and other hydrologists for the Yucca Mountain area. The project includes botanical, faunal, and geomorphic components that will be integrated to accomplish this goal.
Date: December 31, 1994
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Environmental assessment -- Proposed neutrino beams at the Main Injector project

Description: The US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to build a beamline on the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) site to accommodate an experimental research program in neutrino physics. The proposed action, called Neutrino Beams at the Main Injector (NuMI), is to design, construct, operate and decommission a facility for producing and studying a high flux beam of neutrinos in the energy range of 1 to 40 GeV (1 GeV is one billion or 10{sup 9} electron volts). The proposed facility would initially be dedicated to two experiments, COSMOS (Cosmologically Significant Mass Oscillations) and MINOS (Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search). The neutrino beam would pass underground from Fermilab to northern Minnesota. A tunnel would not be built in this intervening region because the neutrinos easily pass through the earth, not interacting, similar to the way that light passes through a pane of glass. The beam is pointed towards the MINOS detector in the Soudan Underground Laboratory in Minnesota. Thus, the proposed project also includes construction, operation and decommissioning of the facility located in the Soudan Underground Laboratory in Minnesota that houses this MINOS detector. This environmental assessment (EA) has been prepared by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in accordance with the DOE`s National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Implementing Procedures (10 CFR 1021). This EA documents DOE`s evaluation of potential environmental impacts associated with the proposed construction and operation of NuMI at Fermilab and its far detector facility located in the Soudan Underground Laboratory in Minnesota. Any future use of the facilities on the Fermilab site would require the administrative approval of the Director of Fermilab and would undergo a separate NEPA review. Fermilab is a Federal high-energy physics research laboratory in Batavia, Illinois operated on behalf of the DOE by Universities Research Association, Inc.
Date: December 1, 1997
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Accelerator research studies. Final report, June 1, 1991--May 31, 1994

Description: The Accelerator Research Studies program at the University of Maryland, sponsored by the Department of Energy is currently in the third year of its three-year funding cycle. The program consists of the following three tasks: Task A -- Study of the transport and longitudinal compression of intense, high-brightness beams; Task B -- Study of high-brightness beam generation in pseudospark devices; Task C -- Study of a gyroklystron high-power microwave source for linear colliders. The research for each task is detailed in this report.
Date: December 31, 1994
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Programmatic and technical requirements for the FMDP fresh MOX fuel transport package

Description: This document is intended to guide the designers of the package to all pertinent regulatory and other design requirements to help ensure the safe and efficient transport of the weapons-grade (WG) fresh MOX fuel under the Fissile Materials Disposition Program. To accomplish the disposition mission using MOX fuel, the unirradiated MOX fuel must be transported from the MOX fabrication facility to one or more commercial reactors. Because the unirradiated fuel contains large quantities of plutonium and is not sufficient radioactive to create a self-protecting barrier to deter the material from theft, DOE intends to use its fleet of safe secure trailers (SSTs) to provide the necessary safeguards and security for the material in transit. In addition to these requirements, transport of radioactive materials must comply with regulations of the Department of Transportation and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). In particular, NRC requires that the packages must meet strict performance requirements. The requirements for shipment of MOX fuel (i.e., radioactive fissile materials) specify that the package design is certified by NRC to ensure the materials contained in the packages are not released and remain subcritical after undergoing a series of hypothetical accident condition tests. Packages that pass these tests are certified by NRC as a Type B fissile (BF) package. This document specifies the programmatic and technical design requirements a package must satisfy to transport the fresh MOX fuel assemblies.
Date: December 1, 1997
Creator: Ludwig, S.B.; Michelhaugh, R.D. & Pope, R.B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Numerical simulation of explosive volcanism and its effects on the atmosphere

Description: This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this project was to begin work on combining two modeling approaches in order to advance the state-of-the-art in simulating and predicting explosive volcanic eruption dynamics and their effects. The authors began applying the CFDLIB family of codes for the near-field (high temperature, velocity, and particle concentration) region of an explosive eruption. The authors also applied the RAMS meteorological code to model the far-field dynamics of eruption clouds and ash fallout. Initial test runs were conducted in preparation for full-scale simulations that would eventually couple the two models for the most comprehensive volcano simulation tool to date. Eventual applications include aviation hazards, risk assessment, and extension to atmospheric collateral effects of conventional and nuclear weapons.
Date: December 31, 1997
Creator: Valentine, G. A. & Bossert, J. E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Disposal of fluidized bed combustion ash in an underground mine to control acid mine drainage and subsidence. Quarterly report, December 1, 1996--February 28, 1997

Description: This project will evaluate the technical, economic and environmental feasibility of filling abandoned underground mine voids with alkaline, advanced coal combustion wastes (Fluidized Bed Combustion -- FBC ash). Success will be measured in terms of technical feasibility of the approach (i.e. % void filling), cost, environmental benefits (acid mine drainage and subsidence control) and environmental impacts (noxious ion release). During Phase 3 the majority of the activity involves completing two full scale demonstration projects. The eleven acre Longridge mine in Preston County will be filled with 53,000 cubic yards of grout during the summer of 1997 and monitored for the following year. The second demonstration involves stowing 2,000 tons of ash into an abandoned mine to demonstrate the newly redesigned Burnett Ejector. This demonstration is anticipated to take place during Summer 1997, as well. This document will report on progress made during Phase 3. The report will be divided into four major sections. The first will be the Hydraulic Injection component. This section of the report will report on progress and milestones associated with the grouting activities of the project. The Phase 3 tasks of Economic Analysis and Regulatory Analysis will be covered under this section. The second component is Pneumatic Injection. This section reports on progress made towards completing the demonstration project. The Water Quality component involves background monitoring of water quality and precipitation at the Phase 3 (Longridge) mine site. The last component involves evaluating the migration of contaminants through the grouted mine. A computer model has been developed in earlier phases and will model the flow of water in and around the grouted Longridge mine.
Date: December 31, 1997
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Sodium technology. Progress report, July-September 1980

Description: This report presents a quarterly summary of progress made in the areas of radioactivity control technology and sodium systems technology. Accomplishments during this period include: radionuclide trap operation in EBR-2; a 8000-h test of radionuclide deposition into 304 and 316 ss; radioactivity surveillance in FFTF HTS; inspection of deposition sampler from EBR-2; sodium frost tests; cold trap testing; effects of mesh packing on natural convection in cold trap crystallizer; and fuel failure monitoring in FFTF and EBR-2. (DLC)
Date: December 1, 1980
Creator: Atwood, J.M. (comp.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Radiation hydrodynamics

Description: This course was intended to provide the participant with an introduction to the theory of radiative transfer, and an understanding of the coupling of radiative processes to the equations describing compressible flow. At moderate temperatures (thousands of degrees), the role of the radiation is primarily one of transporting energy by radiative processes. At higher temperatures (millions of degrees), the energy and momentum densities of the radiation field may become comparable to or even dominate the corresponding fluid quantities. In this case, the radiation field significantly affects the dynamics of the fluid, and it is the description of this regime which is generally the charter of radiation hydrodynamics. The course provided a discussion of the relevant physics and a derivation of the corresponding equations, as well as an examination of several simplified models. Practical applications include astrophysics and nuclear weapons effects phenomena.
Date: December 31, 1982
Creator: Pomraning, G.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Underground natural gas storage reservoir management: Phase 2. Final report, June 1, 1995--March 30, 1996

Description: Gas storage operators are facing increased and more complex responsibilities for managing storage operations under Order 636 which requires unbundling of storage from other pipeline services. Low cost methods that improve the accuracy of inventory verification are needed to optimally manage this stored natural gas. Migration of injected gas out of the storage reservoir has not been well documented by industry. The first portion of this study addressed the scope of unaccounted for gas which may have been due to migration. The volume range was estimated from available databases and reported on an aggregate basis. Information on working gas, base gas, operating capacity, injection and withdrawal volumes, current and non-current revenues, gas losses, storage field demographics and reservoir types is contained among the FERC Form 2, EIA Form 191, AGA and FERC Jurisdictional databases. The key elements of this study show that gas migration can result if reservoir limits have not been properly identified, gas migration can occur in formation with extremely low permeability (0.001 md), horizontal wellbores can reduce gas migration losses and over-pressuring (unintentionally) storage reservoirs by reinjecting working gas over a shorter time period may increase gas migration effects.
Date: December 31, 1996
Creator: Ortiz, I. & Anthony, R.V.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Petroleum supply monthly, December 1995: With data for October 1995

Description: Data presented in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the US and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the US (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the US. The tables and figures in the Summary Statistics section of the PSM present a time series of selected petroleum data on a US level. The Detailed Statistics tables of the PSM present statistics for the most current month available as well as year-to-date. In most cases, the statistics are presented for several geographic areas--the US (50 States and the District of Columbia), five PAD Districts, and 12 Refining Districts. At the US and PAD District level, the total volume and the daily rate of activities are presented. 16 figs., 6 tabs.
Date: December 1, 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Measurements of short-pulse propagation through concrete walls

Description: The authors recently performed a series of experimental measurements of transient electromagnetic (EM) propagation through two different concrete walls. Several different short-duration pulses were used for the incident radiation, with frequency content from VHF to 20 GHz. Both walls were 30 cm thick, with three internal layers of reinforcing steel bars. For this particular set of data, the incident wave polarization was vertical linear only. Corroborating swept-frequency measurements were made with a vector network analyzer. This paper describes the propagation measurements through the two walls, and the propagation model of a lossy dielectric layer. They also examine the transfer function, dielectric constant, loss tangent, attenuation constant, and time-domain impulse response of these walls. The attenuation increases steadily with frequency, and is a strong function of the moisture content of the concrete. The time-domain pulse attenuation and dispersion are consistent with the lowpass-filtering effect of this attenuation loss vs. frequency. The time domain behavior will be very useful in time-domain radar studies of ground-penetrating radar, free-space layered measurement systems, etc.
Date: December 31, 1995
Creator: Aurand, J.F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Cavitation Bubble Nucleation by Energetic Particles

Description: In the early sixties, experimental measurements using a bubble chamber confirmed quantitatively the thermal spike theory of bubble nucleation by energetic particles: the energy of the slow, heavy alpha decay recoils used in those experiments matched the calculated bubble nucleation energy to within a few percent. It was a triumph, but was soon to be followed by a puzzle. Within a couple of years, experiments on similar liquids, but well below their normal boiling points, placed under tensile stress showed that the calculated bubble nucleation energy was an order of magnitude less than the recoil energy. Why should the theory work so well in the one case and so badly in the other? How did the liquid, or the recoil particle, "know" the difference between the two experiments? Another mathematical model of the same physical process, introduced in 1967, showed qualitatively why different analyses would be needed for liquids with high and low vapor pressures under positive or negative pressures. But, the quantitative agreement between the calculated nucleation energy and the recoil energy was still poor--the former being smaller by a factor of two to three. In this report, the 1967 analysis is extended and refined: the qualitative understanding of the difference between positive and negative pressure nucleation, "boiling" and "cavitation" respectively, is retained, and agreement between the negative pressure calculated to be needed for nucleation and the energy calculated to be available is much improved. A plot of the calculated negative pressure needed to induce bubble formation against the measured value now has a slope of 1.0, although there is still considerable scatter in the individual points.
Date: December 1, 1998
Creator: West, C.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Valles natural analogue project

Description: The contact between an obsidian flow and a steep-walled tuff canyon was examined as an analogue for a highlevel waste repository. The analogue site is located in the Valles Caldera in New Mexico, where a massive obsidian flow filled a paleocanyon in the Battleship Rock tuff. The obsidian flow provided a heat source, analogous to waste panels or an igneous intrusion in a repository, and caused evaporation and migration of water. The tuff and obsidian samples were analyzed for major and trace elements and mineralogy by INAA, XRF, X-ray diffraction; and scanning electron microscopy and electron microprobe. Samples were also analyzed for D/H and {sup 39}Ar/{sup 4O} isotopic composition. Overall,the effects of the heating event seem to have been slight and limited to the tuff nearest the contact. There is some evidence of devitrification and migration of volatiles in the tuff within 10 meters of the contact, but variations in major and trace element chemistry are small and difficult to distinguish from the natural (pre-heating) variability of the rocks.
Date: December 1994
Creator: Stockman, H.; Krumhansl, J.; Ho, C. & McConnell, V.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department