369 Matching Results

Search Results

Advanced search parameters have been applied.

Bibliography of Reports Relating to Project Sherwood (Controlled Thermonuclear Reactions) Written at University of California Radiation Laboratory, Livermore and Berkeley : 1953-1957

Description: "This bibliography is a compilation of titles to unclassified reports, journal articles and conference papers written by members of the University of California Radiation Laboratory, Livermore and Berkeley, relating to Project Sherwood (Controlled Thermonuclear Reactions) from 1953 through 1957."
Date: May 1, 1958
Creator: Frost, Frederick E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Bibliography of Reports Relating to Project Sherwood (Controlled Thermonuclear Reactions) Written at University of California Radiation Laboratory, Livermore and Berkeley-1953 Through 1957-Unclassified Section

Description: This bibliography is a compilation of titles to unclassified reports, journal articles, and conference papers. The individual papers are divided into sections according to the year in which they appeared. (M.H.R.)
Date: May 1, 1958
Creator: Frost, F.E. comp.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fusion research: the past is prologue

Description: At this juncture fusion research can be viewed as being at a turning point, a time to review its past and to imagine its future. Today, almost 50 years since the first serious attempts to address the daunting problem of achieving controlled fusion, we have both an opportunity and a challenge. Some predictions place fusion research today at a point midway between its first inception and its eventual maturation - in the middle of the 21st century - when fusion would become a major source of energy. Our opportunity therefore is to assess what we have learned from 50 years of hard work and use that knowledge as a starting point for new and better approaches to solving the fusion problem. Our challenge is to prove the "50 more years" prophesy wrong, by finding ways to shorten the time when fusion power becomes a reality. The thesis will be advanced that in the magnetic confinement approach to fusion open-ended magnetic confinement geometries offer much in responding to the challenge. A major advantage of open systems is that, owing to their theoretically and experimentally demonstrated ability to suppress plasma instabilities of both the MHD and the high-frequency wave-particle variety, the confinement becomes predictable from "classical," i.e., Fokker-Planck-type analysis. In a time of straitened budgetary circumstances for magnetic fusion research now being faced in the United States, the theoretical tractability of mirror-based systems is a substantial asset. In pursuing this avenue it is also necessary to keep an open mind as to the forms that mirror-based fusion power plants might take. For example, one can look to the high-energy physics community for a possible model: This community has shown the feasibility of constructing large and complex particle accelerators using superconducting magnets, vacuum chambers and complicated particle-handling technology, housed in underground tunnels that ...
Date: October 14, 1998
Creator: Post, R F
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Comments about proposed D-He$sup 3$ experiments in the TFTR

Description: D-He$sup 3$ experiments to simulate DT burns in TFTR have been proposed by members of the Fusion Studies Center at the University of Illinois. Some basic considerations, involved in planning these experiments, are discussed along with important results to be obtained from such measurements. It is argued that fusion-product orbits, instabilities, and other phenomena can be investigated by D-He$sup 3$ simulation of DT burns, before the TFTR is contaminated by tritium. This approach will allow changes in experimental design before subsequent DT burn studies. (auth)
Date: October 1, 1975
Creator: Hively, L.M. & Miley, G.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

END-LOSSES FROM MIRROR MACHINES

Description: A theoretical treatment of the loss of plasmas from the ends of magnetic mirror machines, based on the FokkerPlanck equation is given. The plasma losses are described in terms of the evolution in time of distribution functions. Some supplementary calculations based on these distribution functions were made. These include charge-exchangereaction rates and fusion-reaction rates for the DD and DT reactions. (auth)
Date: April 1, 1960
Creator: Roberts, J.E. & Carr, M.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Derivation and Implementation of Hybrid Fluid/Kinetic Model for Fusion Plasmas

Description: This is a final report for Dr. Eric Held’s Junior Faculty in Plasmas Physics grant entitled, “Derivation and Implementation of Hybrid Fluid/Kinetic Model for Fusion Plasmas”. Progress over the three years and six months of this project included work on analytical and numerical fronts.
Date: August 15, 2005
Creator: Held, E. D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Advice and recommendations to the US Department of Energy in response to the charge letter of September 20, 1996

Description: In Jan. 1996, the Fusion Energy Advisory Committee (FEAC) provided recommendations to DOE on how to restructure the fusion program in light of compressional guidance and budget realities. DOE endorsed these recommendations and prepared a strategic plan. The FEAC report concluded that the goals of the restructured program could most effectively be accomplished at a funding level of $275 million per year, including Federal government management costs. DOE requested that Congress appropriate $255.6 million in FY97 for the fusion energy sciences program exclusive of Federal government management costs (about $8 million). On Sept. 11, 1996, the Energy and Water Development Conference Committee settled on a FY97 appropriation for the fusion energy sciences program of $232.5 million. This report contains the response to the charge letter, on how the program described in the strategic plan could be changed to make it consistent with the $232.5 million appropriation.
Date: November 1, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Numerical simulation of bump-on-tail instability with source and sink

Description: This paper presents results of the simulations of the bump-on-tail instability with a weak source and sink. This problem has been posed as a paradigm for the important problem in controlled fusion, that of the unstable excitation of Alfven waves in a tokamak by resonant energetic alpha particles. The source of alpha particles is the controlled fusion reaction produced by the background plasma and the sink is the collisional transport processes that slow down or scatter the energetic particles. The mathematical techniques that are needed to address this applied problem can be demonstrated in the much simpler bump-on-tail problem, which is explained in this paper.
Date: February 1, 1995
Creator: Berk, H.L.; Pekker, M. & Breizman, B.N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Beam losses and beam halos in accelerators for new energy sources

Description: Large particle accelerators are proposed as drivers for new ways to produce electricity from nuclear fusion and fission reactions. The accelerators must be designed to deliver large particle beam currents to a target facility with very little beam spill along the accelerator itself, in order that accelerator maintenance can be accomplished without remote manipulators. Typically, particle loss is preceded by the formation of a tenuous halo of particles around the central beam core, caused by beam dynamics effects, often coupled with the slight imperfections inevitable in a practical design. If the halo becomes large enough, particles may be scraped off along the accelerator. The tolerance for beam spill in different applications is discussed, halo mechanisms and recent work to explore and understand their dynamics are reviewed, and possible directions for future investigation are outlined. 17 refs., 10 figs.
Date: December 31, 1995
Creator: Jameson, R.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Strategic plan for the restructured US fusion energy sciences program

Description: This plan reflects a transition to a restructured fusion program, with a change in focus from an energy technology development program to a fusion energy sciences program. Since the energy crisis of the early 1970`s, the U.S. fusion program has presented itself as a goal- oriented fusion energy development program, with milestones that required rapidly increasing budgets. The Energy Policy Act of 1992 also called for a goal-oriented development program consistent with the Department`s planning. Actual funding levels, however, have forced a premature narrowing of the program to the tokamak approach. By 1995, with no clear, immediate need driving the schedule for developing fusion energy and with enormous pressure to reduce discretionary spending, Congress cut fusion program funding for FY 1996 by one-third and called for a major restructuring of the program. Based on the recommendations of the Fusion Energy Advisory Committee (FEAC), the Department has decided to pursue a program that concentrates on world-class plasma, science, and on maintaining an involvement in fusion energy science through international collaboration. At the same time, the Japanese and Europeans, with energy situations different from ours, are continuing with their goal- oriented fusion programs. Collaboration with them provides a highly leveraged means of continued involvement in fusion energy science and technology, especially through participation in the engineering and design activities of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor program, ITER. This restructured fusion energy sciences program, with its focus on fundamental fusion science and technology, may well provide insights that lead to more attractive fusion power plants, and will make use of the scientific infrastructure that will allow the United States to launch a fusion energy development program at some future date.
Date: August 1, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fusion Concept Exploration Experiments at PPPL

Description: Small ''concept exploration'' experiments have for many years been an important part of the fusion research program at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). this paper describes some of the present and planned fusion concept exploration experiments at PPPL. These experiments are a University-scale research level, in contrast with the larger fusion devices at PPPL such as the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), which are at ''proof-of-principle'' and ''proof-of-performance'' levels, respectively.
Date: May 1, 1999
Creator: Zweben, Stewart; Cohen, Samuel; Ji, Hantao; Kaita, Robert; Majeski, Richard & Yamada, Masaaki
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department