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Digitization Basics for Museums

Description: This presentation discusses The Portal to Texas History and illustrates what types of items are in the collection and the resources available to museums, educators, and partners. It also discusses the future goals of The Portal to Texas History.
Date: April 5, 2006
Creator: Belden, Dreanna
Partner: UNT Libraries

Eavesdropping on Texas History

Description: Mary L. Scheer has assembled fifteen contributors to explore special moments in Texas history. The contributors assembled for this anthology represent many of the “all stars” among Texas historians: two State Historians of Texas, two past presidents of TSHA, four current or past presidents of ETHA, two past presidents of WTHA, nine fellows of historical associations, two Fulbright Scholars, and seven award-winning authors. Each is an expert in his or her field and provided in some fashion an answer to the question: At what moment in Texas history would you have liked to have been a “fly on the wall” and why? The choice of a moment and the answers were both personal and individual, ranging from familiar topics to less well-known subjects. One wanted to be at the Alamo. Another chose to explore when Sam Houston refused to take a loyalty oath to the Confederacy. One chapter follows the first twenty-four hours of Lyndon Baines Johnson’s presidency after Kennedy’s assassination. Others write about the Dust Bowl coming to Texas, or when Texas Southern University was created.
Access: This item is restricted to UNT Community Members. Login required if off-campus.
Date: February 2017
Creator: Scheer, Mary L.
Partner: UNT Press

Portal to Texas History Grant Materials

Description: These grant materials were prepared to create the Portal to Texas History a project funded by the Telecommunications Infrastructure Fund (TIF) to create a gateway to historic materials. The Award funded the creation and first iteration of The Portal to Texas History. The project was funded for $197,410.
Date: July 2002
Creator: Hartman, Cathy Nelson
Partner: UNT Libraries

Digitization in Three Strokes: Digital Commonwealth, Minnesota Digital Library, and The Portal to Texas History

Description: This presentation is part of the panel "Digitization in Three Strokes: Digital Commonwealth, Minnesota Digital Library, and The Portal to Texas History," from DPLAfest 2016. This presentation provides an overview of The Portal to Texas History project through the Rescuing Texas History Mini-Grant Program.
Date: April 15, 2016
Creator: McIntosh, Marcia & Mangum, Jake
Partner: UNT Libraries Digital Projects Unit

Introduction to the UNT Digital Collections

Description: Presentation on the University of North Texas (UNT) Digital Library and The Portal to Texas History. The topics include featured collections in The Portal to Texas History and in the UNT Digital Library, and the special collections of maps and their features and usage.
Date: October 1, 2011
Creator: Tarver, Hannah
Partner: UNT Libraries

Targeted Access for Varied Audiences to Integrated, Heterogeneous Digital Information Resources [Poster]

Description: Poster presented at the 2003 ASIS&T Annual Conference. The poster describes the University of North Texas (UNT) Libraries' Portal to Texas History project, which aims to integrate and ensure long-term access to large quantities of heterogeneous digital resources from many different institutions.
Date: 2003
Creator: Alemneh, Daniel Gelaw; Hartman, Cathy Nelson & Hastings, Samantha Kelly
Partner: UNT Libraries

Burying the War Hatchet: Spanish-Comanche Relations in Colonial Texas, 1743-1821

Description: This dissertation provides a history of Spanish-Comanche relations during the era of Spanish Texas. The study is based on research in archival documents, some newly discovered. Chapter 1 presents an overview of events that brought both people to the land that Spaniards named Texas. The remaining chapters provide a detailed account of Spanish-Comanche interaction from first contact until the end of Spanish rule in 1821. Although it is generally written that Spaniards first met Comanches at San Antonio de Béxar in 1743, a careful examination of Spanish documents indicates that Spaniards heard rumors of Comanches in Texas in the 1740s, but their first meeting did not occur until the early 1750s. From that first encounter until the close of the Spanish era, Spanish authorities instituted a number of different policies in their efforts to coexist peacefully with the Comanche nation. The author explores each of those policies, how the Comanches reacted to those policies, and the impact of that diplomacy on both cultures. Spaniards and Comanches negotiated a peace treaty in 1785, and that treaty remained in effect, with varying degrees of success, for the duration of Spanish rule. Leaders on both sides were committed to maintaining that peace, although Spaniards were hampered by meager resources and Comanches by the decentralized organization of their society. The dissertation includes a detailed account of the Spanish expedition to the Red River in 1759, led by Colonel Diego Ortiz Parrilla. That account, based on the recently discovered diary of Juan Angel de Oyarzún, provides new information on the campaign as well as a reevaluation of its outcome. The primary intention of this study is to provide a balanced account of Spanish-Comanche relations, relying on the historical record as well as anthropological evidence to uncover, wherever possible, the Comanche side of the story. The ...
Access: This item is restricted to UNT Community Members. Login required if off-campus.
Date: May 2002
Creator: Lipscomb, Carol A.
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Overland Cattle Trade

Description: One of the most fascinating subjects in all American history is the story of the great cow country. Its heyday was the twenty-year period from 1868 to 1888. It extended from below the Rio Grande on the south to well up in Saskatchewan in western Canada on the north. East and west it reached from the Rocky Mountains to about the Missouri- Arkansas border. It occupied a region nearly 2,000 miles long and from 200 to 700 miles wide--almost a million square miles in one vast open range. For countless years this region had been the home of millions of wild buffaloes, but in a very short time after 1868 it was transformed into a gigantic cattle kingdom. After two decades of spectacular existence, it just as suddenly passed away, and the cattle industry entered a new and in many ways an entirely different era. Texas cattle and Texas cattlemen played leading roles in this great drama of the West. The warm southern plains of Texas were the breeding place-the "incubator"-f or thousands of longhorn cattle, the broad prairies to the north were their feeding grounds, and the newly established railroad towns in Kansas and other states were the shipping points.
Date: August 1952
Creator: Massey, Travis Leon
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Peek in the Portal: The University of North Texas The Portal to Texas History

Description: This presentation provides a brief look into the digital collections added to The University of North Texas’ The Portal to Texas History in the last year. Examples include projects completed through our Rescuing Texas History Mini-Grant program for 2014, The Barbara Jordan Archives Collection, and the Texas Historical Commission’s Historic Building Negatives Collection among others.
Date: April 14, 2016
Creator: McIntosh, Marcia
Partner: UNT Libraries Digital Projects Unit

Lone Star Insanity: Efforts to Treat the Mentally Ill in Texas, 1861-1929

Description: During the mid-nineteenth century, the citizens of Texas were forced to keep their mentally disturbed family members at home which caused stress on the caregivers and the further debilitation of the afflicted. To remedy this situation, mental health experts and Texas politicians began to create a system of healing known as state asylums. The purpose of this study is to determine how Texas mental health care came into being, the research and theories behind the prevention and treatment programs that asylum physicians employed to overcome mental illness, in addition to the victories and shortcomings of the system. Through this work, it will be shown that during the 1850s until the 1920s institutions faced difficulty in achieving success from many adverse conditions including, but not limited to, overcrowding, large geographical conditions, poor health practices, faulty construction, insufficient funding, ineffective prevention and treatment methods, disorganization, cases of patient abuse, incompetent employees, prejudice, and legal improprieties. As a result, by 1930, these asylums were merely places to detain the mentally ill in order to rid them from society. This thesis will also confirm that while both Texas politicians and mental health experts desired to address and overcome mental illness in Texas, they were unable to do so due to arguments, selfishness, corruption, failures, and inaction on the part of both sides. However, this thesis will ultimately reveal it was lack of full support from Texas legislators, deriving from the idea that this system was not one of their top priorities among the state’s concerns, that led to the inability of the Texas mental health care system to properly assist their patients.
Access: This item is restricted to UNT Community Members. Login required if off-campus.
Date: December 2015
Creator: Boyd, Dalton T.
Partner: UNT Libraries

A comparison of the white and the colored schools of Texas

Description: The purpose of this study is to determine the status of the educational opportunities of the white and the colored child in the State of Texas during the year of 1935-36 and to locate the inequalities with reference to: building equipment, transportation, library facilities, teachers, average daily attendance of pupils, teacher-pupil ratio, per pupil cost of instruction, age-grade distribution, and age of pupils when graduated.
Date: August 1938
Creator: Kattner, Bruno A.
Partner: UNT Libraries

A History of Fort Worth in Black & White 165 Years of African-American Life

Description: A History of Fort Worth in Black & White fills a long-empty niche on the Fort Worth bookshelf: a scholarly history of the city's black community that starts at the beginning with Ripley Arnold and the early settlers, and comes down to today with our current battles over education, housing, and representation in city affairs. The book's sidebars on some noted and some not-so-noted African Americans make it appealing as a school text as well as a book for the general reader. Using a wealth of primary sources, Richard Selcer dispels several enduring myths, for instance the mistaken belief that Camp Bowie trained only white soldiers, and the spurious claim that Fort Worth managed to avoid the racial violence that plagued other American cities in the twentieth century. Selcer arrives at some surprisingly frank conclusions that will challenge current politically correct notions. "Selcer does a great job of exploring little-known history about the military, education, sports and even some social life and organizations."--Bob Ray Sanders, author of Calvin Littlejohn: Portrait of a Community in Black and White.
Access: This item is restricted to UNT Community Members. Login required if off-campus.
Date: November 2015
Creator: Selcer, Richard F.
Partner: UNT Press

His, Hers, and Theirs: Domestic Relations and Marital Property Law in Texas to 1850

Description: Texas law regarding the legal status of women and their property rights developed from the mingling of Spanish and English laws. Spanish laws regarding the protection of women's rights developed during the centuries-long Reconquest, when the Spanish Christians slowly took back the Iberian Peninsula from the Moorish conquerors. Women were of special importance to the expansion of Spanish civilization. Later, when Spain conquered and colonized the New World, these rights for women came, too. In the New World, women's rights under Spanish law remained the same as in Spain. Again, the Spanish were spreading their civilization across frontiers and women needed protection. When the Spanish moved into Texas, they brought their laws with them yet again. Archival evidence demonstrates that Spanish laws in early Texas remained essentially unchanged with regard to the status of women. Events in the history of England caused its legal system to develop in a different manner from Spain's. In England, the protection of property was the law's most important goal. With the growth of English common law, husbands gained the right to control their wives's lives in that married women lost all legal identity. When the English legal system crossed the Atlantic and took root in the United States, little changed, especially in the southern states, when migrants from there entered Texas. When these Anglo-American colonists came into contact with Spanish/Mexican laws, they tended to prefer the legal system they knew best. Accordingly, with the creation of the Republic of Texas, and later the state of Texas, most laws derived from English common law. From Spanish laws, legislators adopted only those that dealt with the protection of women, developed on the Spanish frontier, because they were so much more suitable to life in Texas. Later lawmakers and judges used these same laws to protect the ...
Date: May 2000
Creator: Stuntz, Jean A.
Partner: UNT Libraries

A history of Lon Morris College

Description: The problem with which this study is concerned is that of analyzing the implementation of the stated purposes of analyzing the implementation of the stated purposes of Lon Morris College of Jacksonville, Texas from 1847 to 1973. Histories and Journals of the period, records and publications of the school and other institutions, and oral interviews of persons involved in its development provide data for the study. As a historical analysis, the study is divided according to successive periods in the school's development.
Date: May 1973
Creator: Jones, Glendell A.
Partner: UNT Libraries