354 Matching Results

Search Results

Advanced search parameters have been applied.

Tectonics of Southeastern Arizona

Description: From abstract: The part of Arizona south and east of Tucson is underlain by a wide assortment of deformed rocks, as well as by some major mineralized districts. A synthesis of the tectonic evolution of the region is offered in this report, which is based on older studies of mining districts and on more recent field studies by students and by the U.S. Geological Survey, augmented by field review and selective remapping of many key areas. Through this synthesis the rocks of the region are seen to have been deformed in response to diverse stresses, at various times, with an increasing degree of structural anisotropy of the rocks through time. Consequently, reactivated faults are common features, and segments of some of these faults record various kinds of movement, thereby providing unusual interpretive difficulties for many of the past local studies.
Date: 1981
Creator: Drewes, Harald D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Source Analysis of the Crandall Canyon, Utah, Mine Collapse

Description: Analysis of seismograms from a magnitude 3.9 seismic event on August 6, 2007 in central Utah reveals an anomalous radiation pattern that is contrary to that expected for a tectonic earthquake, and which is dominated by an implosive component. The results show the seismic event is best modeled as a shallow underground collapse. Interestingly, large transverse surface waves require a smaller additional non-collapse source component that represents either faulting in the rocks above the mine workings or deformation of the medium surrounding the mine.
Date: February 28, 2008
Creator: Dreger, D S; Ford, S R & Walter, W R
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Comprehensive study of the seismotectonics of the eastern Aleutian arc and associated volcanic systems. Annual progress report, March 1, 1980-February 28, 1981

Description: Refined hypocenter locations beneath the Shumagin Islands seismic network of the eastern Aleutian arc, Alaska, provide for the first time conclusive evidence for a double-sheeted dipping seismic (Benioff) zone in this arc. This refined seismicity structure was obtained in the arc section centered on the Shumagin seismic gap. A thorough review of three seismic gaps in the eastern Aleutian arc shows a high potential for great earthquakes within the next one to two decades in the Shumagin and Yakataga seismic gaps, and a less certain potential for a large or great earthquake in the possible Unalaska gap. A tilt reversal was geodetically observed to have occurred in 1978/79 in the forearc region of the Shumagin gap and could indicate the onset of a precursory strain relief episode prior to a great quake. A comparative study of the Pavlof volcano seismicity with that of other recently active volcanoes (i.e., Mt. St. Helens) indicates that island-arc (explosive-type) volcanoes respond to small ambient, periodic stress changes (i.e., tides). Stress drop measurements from earthquakes on the main thrust zone indicate high stress drops within the seismic gap regions of the Aleutian arc and low stress drops outside the gap region.
Date: January 1, 1981
Creator: Jacob, K.H.; Davies, J.N. & House, L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Geology of the southern Guadalupe Mountains, Texas

Description: From Abstract: "This report deals with an area of 425 square miles in the western part of Texas, immediately south of the New Mexico line. The report describes the geology of the area, that is, the nature of its rocks, tectonics, and surface features, and the evidence that they give as to the evolution of the area through geologic time. Incidental reference is made to the geology of surrounding regions in order to place the area in its environment."
Date: 1948
Creator: King, Philip B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Quarterly seismic monitoring report 96B

Description: This report summarizes the location, magnitude, and other pertinent information on earthquakes recorded on and near the Hanford Site by Westinghouse Seismic Monitoring during the period encompassing January 1, 1996 to March 31, 1996.
Date: June 12, 1996
Creator: Reidel, S.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

BASIN ANALYSIS AND PETROLEUM SYSTEM CHARACTERIZATION AND MODELING, INTERIOR SALT BASINS, CENTRAL AND EASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

Description: The principal research effort for Year 1 of the project is data compilation and the determination of the tectonic and depositional histories of the North Louisiana Salt Basin. In the first three (3) to six (6) months of Year 1, the research focus is on data compilation and the remainder of the year the emphasis is on the tectonic and depositional histories of the basin. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule. The principal objectives of the project are to develop through basin analysis and modeling the concept that petroleum systems acting in a basin can be identified through basin modeling and to demonstrate that the information and analysis resulting from characterizing and modeling of these petroleum systems in the North Louisiana Salt Basin and the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin can be used in providing a more reliable and advanced approach for targeting stratigraphic traps and specific reservoir facies within a geologic system and in providing a refined assessment of undiscovered and underdeveloped reservoirs and associated oil and gas resources.
Date: February 5, 2004
Creator: Mancini, Ernest A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

BASIN ANALYSIS AND PETROLEUM SYSTEM CHARACTERIZATION AND MODELING, INTERIOR SALT BASINS, CENTRAL AND EASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

Description: The principal research effort for Year 1 of the project is data compilation and the determination of the tectonic and depositional histories of the North Louisiana Salt Basin. In the first three (3) to six (6) months of Year 1, the research focus is on data compilation and the remainder of the year the emphasis is on the tectonic and depositional histories of the basin. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule.
Date: September 11, 2003
Creator: Mancini, Ernest A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

BASIN ANALYSIS AND PETROLEUM SYSTEM CHARACTERIZATION AND MODELING, INTERIOR SALT BASINS, CENTRAL AND EASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

Description: The principal research effort for Year 1 of the project is data compilation and the determination of the tectonic and depositional histories of the North Louisiana Salt Basin. In the first three (3) to six (6) months of Year 1, the research focus is on data compilation and the remainder of the year the emphasis is on the tectonic and depositional histories of the basin. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule.
Date: November 11, 2003
Creator: Mancini, Ernest A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

BASIN ANALYSIS OF THE MISSISSIPPI INTERIOR SALT BASIN AND PETROLEUM SYSTEM MODELING OF THE JURASSIC SMACKOVER FORMATION, EASTERN GULF COASTAL PLAIN

Description: Part 2 (Basin Analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin) objectives are to provide a comprehensive analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin in Years 2 and 3 of the project and to transfer effectively the research results to producers through workshops and topical reports. Work accomplished so far: (Task 1) Tectonic History--Petroleum traps in the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin have been characterized. (Task 2) Depositional History--The depositional systems for Mesozoic strata in the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin have been identified and characterized. (Task 3) Fluid Flow--Modeling of 1-D burial and thermal history profiles for 48 wells in the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin has been completed. Multidimensional thermal maturity modeling has been initiated. (Task 4) Underdeveloped Plays--Three major exploration plays have been identified. These include the basement ridge play, the regional peripheral fault trend play, and the salt anticline play. (Task 5) Technology Transfer--No work was performed on this task for this quarter. (Task 6) Topical Reports--The topical reports on the tectonic, depositional, burial and thermal histories of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin have been completed and sent to DOE.
Date: April 9, 1999
Creator: Ernest A,. Mancini
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Caucasus Seismic Information Network: Data and Analysis Final Report

Description: The geology and tectonics of the Caucasus region (Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Georgia) are highly variable. Consequently, generating a structural model and characterizing seismic wave propagation in the region require data from local seismic networks. As of eight years ago, there was only one broadband digital station operating in the region – an IRIS station at Garni, Armenia – and few analog stations. The Caucasus Seismic Information Network (CauSIN) project is part of a nulti-national effort to build a knowledge base of seismicity and tectonics in the region. During this project, three major tasks were completed: 1) collection of seismic data, both in event catalogus and phase arrival time picks; 2) development of a 3-D P-wave velocity model of the region obtained through crustal tomography; 3) advances in geological and tectonic models of the region. The first two tasks are interrelated. A large suite of historical and recent seismic data were collected for the Caucasus. These data were mainly analog prior to 2000, and more recently, in Georgia and Azerbaijan, the data are digital. Based on the most reliable data from regional networks, a crustal model was developed using 3-D tomographic inversion. The results of the inversion are presented, and the supporting seismic data are reported. The third task was carried out on several fronts. Geologically, the goal of obtaining an integrated geological map of the Caucasus on a scale of 1:500,000 was initiated. The map for Georgia has been completed. This map serves as a guide for the final incorporation of the data from Armenia and Azerbaijan. Description of the geological units across borders has been worked out and formation boundaries across borders have been agreed upon. Currently, Armenia and Azerbaijan are working with scientists in Georgia to complete this task. The successful integration of the geologic data also required ...
Date: February 22, 2007
Creator: Martin, Randolph; Krasovec, Mary; Romer, Spring; O'Connor, Timothy; Bombolakis, Emanuel G.; Sun, Youshun et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Comprehensive study of the seismotectonics of the eastern Aleutian ARC and associated volcanic systems. Annual progress report, March 1, 1981-February 28, 1982

Description: Assessment of the seismic potential for occurrence of great earthquakes in three seismic gaps (Shumagin Islands, Unalaska Island, and Yakataga-Kayak regions) has been completed. In the best-instrumented seismic gap in the Shumagin Islands region, the likelihood for a great earthquake within the next two decades is high. Analysis of earthquake data collected from a telemetered network operated in the Shumagin seismic gap shows near-quiescence in the shallow portion of the main thrust zone. Installation of digital recording equipment at the central station of the Shumagin network, combined with interactive computer analysis at Lamont-Doherty of either digitally recorded or digitized analog seismic data has provided new research possibilities for studying seismic source properties, wave propagation in a laterally heterogeneous velocity structure of the subduction zone, and for seismically screening the root-zone and volcanic pile of Pavlof volcano. High time-resolution data (0.01 sec), and wider frequency band-pass data (0.5 to 30 Hz) are now being collected. Seismic data for two eruptive sequences of Pavlof-volcano have been obtained.
Date: January 1, 1981
Creator: Jacob, K. H.; Hauksson, E. & Sykes, L. R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

In situ stress field in the southeastern United States and its implication

Description: Published and unpublished in situ stress measurements and studies of earthquake focal mechanisms in the southeastern United States are reviewed. These data, which provide information on the relative magnitude and orientation of existing stress fields, are analyzed in relation to the geologic characteristics of the Southeast and are compared with data for other areas in the United States. The relation of the stress fields to observed geology and present-day tectonic processes is reviewed. Stress measurements reveal the existence of high horizontal stresses in the Appalachian complex. Different in situ stress states in the Appalachian complex, the Coastal Plain, and the stable interior region indicate different faulting mechanisms. Various techniques for determining in situ stress are consistent. 6 figures, 1 table.
Date: January 1, 1979
Creator: Stephenson, D.E. & Pratt, H.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Tectonics of west central New Mexico and adjacent Arizona: a remote sensing and field study in arid and semi-arid areas

Description: Large-scale fault zones in west-central New Mexico and eastern Arizona were mapped using conventional fieldwork aided by Landsat and Seasat images and high altitude air photos. These faults, which are of post-early Miocene age, trend NE-SW and N-S and extend over 200 km. The fault zones bound very large horst and graben blocks which, although located on the physiographic Colorado Plateau, are characteristic of Basin and Range deformation. Their intersection has been the locus of extensive Cenozoic volcanism. The procedure developed in this project permitted investigation of an area of about 1.8 x 10/sup 5/ km/sup 2/ of arid and semi-arid land whose structures previously were poorly defined.
Date: January 1, 1981
Creator: Baldridge, W.S.; Bartov, Y. & Kron, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Accuracy tests of the tessellated SLBM model

Description: We have compared the Seismic Location Base Model (SLBM) tessellated model (version 2.0 Beta, posted July 3, 2007) with the GNEMRE Unified Model. The comparison is done on a layer/depth-by-layer/depth and layer/velocity-by-layer/velocity comparison. The SLBM earth model is defined on a tessellation that spans the globe at a constant resolution of about 1 degree (Ballard, 2007). For the tests, we used the earth model in file ''unified{_}iasp.grid''. This model contains the top 8 layers of the Unified Model (UM) embedded in a global IASP91 grid. Our test queried the same set of nodes included in the UM model file. To query the model stored in memory, we used some of the functionality built into the SLBMInterface object. We used the method get InterpolatedPoint() to return desired values for each layer at user-specified points. The values returned include: depth to the top of each layer, layer velocity, layer thickness and (for the upper-mantle layer) velocity gradient. The SLBM earth model has an extra middle crust layer whose values are used when Pg/Lg phases are being calculated. This extra layer was not accessed by our tests. Figures 1 to 8 compare the layer depths, P velocities and P gradients in the UM and SLBM models. The figures show results for the three sediment layers, three crustal layers and the upper mantle layer defined in the UM model. Each layer in the models (sediment1, sediment2, sediment3, upper crust, middle crust, lower crust and upper mantle) is shown on a separate figure. The upper mantle P velocity and gradient distribution are shown on Figures 7 and 8. The left and center images in the top row of each figure is the rendering of depth to the top of the specified layer for the UM and SLBM models. When a layer has zero thickness, its ...
Date: July 20, 2007
Creator: Ramirez, A L & Myers, S C
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

LLNL-Generated Content for the California Academy of Sciences, Morrison Planetarium Full-Dome Show: Earthquake

Description: The California Academy of Sciences (CAS) Morrison Planetarium is producing a 'full-dome' planetarium show on earthquakes and asked LLNL to produce content for the show. Specifically the show features numerical ground motion simulations of the M 7.9 1906 San Francisco and a possible future M 7.05 Hayward fault scenario earthquake. The show also features concepts of plate tectonics and mantle convection using images from LLNL's G3D global seismic tomography. This document describes the data that was provided to the CAS in support of production of the 'Earthquake' show. The CAS is located in Golden Gate Park, San Francisco and hosts over 1.6 million visitors. The Morrison Planetarium, within the CAS, is the largest all digital planetarium in the world. It features a 75-foot diameter spherical section projection screen tilted at a 30-degree angle. Six projectors cover the entire field of view and give a three-dimensional immersive experience. CAS shows strive to use scientifically accurate digital data in their productions. The show, entitled simply 'Earthquake', will debut on 26 May 2012. They are working on graphics and animations based on the same data sets for display on LLNL powerwalls and flat-screens as well as for public release.
Date: January 23, 2012
Creator: Rodgers, A J; Petersson, N A; Morency, C E; Simmons, N A & Sjogreen, B
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

2-D Path Corrections for Local and Regional Coda Waves: A Test of Transportability

Description: Reliable estimates of the seismic source spectrum are necessary for accurate magnitude, yield, and energy estimation. In particular, how seismic radiated energy scales with increasing earthquake size has been the focus of recent debate within the community and has direct implications on earthquake source physics studies as well as hazard mitigation. The 1-D coda methodology of Mayeda et al. [2003] has provided the lowest variance estimate of the source spectrum when compared against traditional approaches that use direct S-waves, thus making it ideal for networks that have sparse station distribution. The 1-D coda methodology has been mostly confined to regions of approximately uniform complexity. For larger, more geophysically complicated regions, 2-D path corrections may be required. We will compare performance of 1-D versus 2-D path corrections in a variety of regions. First, the complicated tectonics of the northern California region coupled with high quality broadband seismic data provides for an ideal ''apples-to-apples'' test of 1-D and 2-D path assumptions on direct waves and their coda. Next, we will compare results for the Italian Alps using high frequency data from the University of Genoa. For Northern California, we used the same station and event distribution and compared 1-D and 2-D path corrections and observed the following results: (1) 1-D coda results reduced the amplitude variance relative to direct S-waves by roughly a factor of 8 (800%); (2) Applying a 2-D correction to the coda resulted in up to 40% variance reduction from the 1-D coda results; (3) 2-D direct S-wave results, though better than 1-D direct waves, were significantly worse than the 1-D coda. We found that coda-based moment-rate source spectra derived from the 2-D approach were essentially identical to those from the 1-D approach for frequencies less than {approx}0.7-Hz, however for the high frequencies (0.7 {le} f {le} 8.0-Hz), the ...
Date: July 13, 2005
Creator: Mayeda, K M; Malagnini, L; Phillips, W S; Walter, W R; Dreger, D S & Morasca, P
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

2-D or not 2-D, that is the question: A Northern California test

Description: Reliable estimates of the seismic source spectrum are necessary for accurate magnitude, yield, and energy estimation. In particular, how seismic radiated energy scales with increasing earthquake size has been the focus of recent debate within the community and has direct implications on earthquake source physics studies as well as hazard mitigation. The 1-D coda methodology of Mayeda et al. has provided the lowest variance estimate of the source spectrum when compared against traditional approaches that use direct S-waves, thus making it ideal for networks that have sparse station distribution. The 1-D coda methodology has been mostly confined to regions of approximately uniform complexity. For larger, more geophysically complicated regions, 2-D path corrections may be required. The complicated tectonics of the northern California region coupled with high quality broadband seismic data provides for an ideal ''apples-to-apples'' test of 1-D and 2-D path assumptions on direct waves and their coda. Using the same station and event distribution, we compared 1-D and 2-D path corrections and observed the following results: (1) 1-D coda results reduced the amplitude variance relative to direct S-waves by roughly a factor of 8 (800%); (2) Applying a 2-D correction to the coda resulted in up to 40% variance reduction from the 1-D coda results; (3) 2-D direct S-wave results, though better than 1-D direct waves, were significantly worse than the 1-D coda. We found that coda-based moment-rate source spectra derived from the 2-D approach were essentially identical to those from the 1-D approach for frequencies less than {approx}0.7-Hz, however for the high frequencies (0.7{le} f {le} 8.0-Hz), the 2-D approach resulted in inter-station scatter that was generally 10-30% smaller. For complex regions where data are plentiful, a 2-D approach can significantly improve upon the simple 1-D assumption. In regions where only 1-D coda correction is available it is ...
Date: June 6, 2005
Creator: Mayeda, K; Malagnini, L; Phillips, W S; Walter, W R & Dreger, D
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Structure of the Crust beneath Cameroon, West Africa, from the Joint Inversion of Rayleigh Wave Group Velocities and Receiver Functions

Description: The Cameroon Volcanic Line (CVL) is a major geologic feature that cuts across Cameroon from the south west to the north east. It is a unique volcanic lineament which has both an oceanic and a continental sector and consists of a chain of Tertiary to Recent, generally alkaline volcanoes stretching from the Atlantic island of Pagalu to the interior of the African continent. The oceanic sector includes the islands of Bioko (formerly Fernando Po) and Sao Tome and Principe while the continental sector includes the Etinde, Cameroon, Manengouba, Bamboutos, Oku and Mandara mountains, as well as the Adamawa and Biu Plateaus. In addition to the CVL, three other major tectonic features characterize the region: the Benue Trough located northwest of the CVL, the Central African Shear Zone (CASZ), trending N70 degrees E, roughly parallel to the CVL, and the Congo Craton in southern Cameroon. The origin of the CVL is still the subject of considerable debate, with both plume and non-plume models invoked by many authors (e.g., Deruelle et al., 2007; Ngako et al, 2006; Ritsema and Allen, 2003; Burke, 2001; Ebinger and Sleep, 1998; Lee et al, 1994; Dorbath et al., 1986; Fairhead and Binks, 1991; King and Ritsema, 2000; Reusch et al., 2010). Crustal structure beneath Cameroon has been investigated previously using active (Stuart et al, 1985) and passive (Dorbath et al., 1986; Tabod, 1991; Tabod et al, 1992; Plomerova et al, 1993) source seismic data, revealing a crust about 33 km thick at the south-western end of the continental portion of the CVL (Tabod, 1991) and the Adamawa Plateau, and thinner crust (23 km thick) beneath the Garoua Rift in the north (Stuart et al, 1985) (Figure 1). Estimates of crustal thickness obtained using gravity data show similar variations between the Garoua rift, Adamawa Plateau, and southern ...
Date: February 18, 2010
Creator: Tokam, A K; Tabod, C T; Nyblade, A A; Julia, J; Wiens, D A & Pasyanos, M E
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Preliminary results from the lunar prospector alpha particle spectrometer

Description: The Lunar Prospector Alpha Particle Spectrometer (LP APS) builds on Apollo heritage and maps the distribution of outgassing sites on the Moon. The APS searches for lunar surface gas release events and maps their distribution by detecting alpha particles produced by the decay of gaseous radon-222 (5.5 MeV, 3.8 day half-life) and solid polonium-210 (5.3 MeV, 138 day half-life, but remains on the surface with a 21 year half-life as lead-210), which are radioactive daughters from the decay of uranium-238. Radon is in such small quantities that it is not released directly from the lunar interior, rather it is entrained in a stream of gases and serves as a tracer for such gases. Once released, the radon spreads out by 'bouncing' across the surface on ballistic trajectories in a random-walk process. The 3.8 day half-life of radon-222 allows the gas to spread out by several 100 km before it decays and allows the APS to detect gas release events up to a few days after they occur. The long residence time (10s of years) of the lead-210 precursor to the polonium-210 allows the mapping of gas vents which have been active over the last approximately 50 years. Because radon and polonium are daughter products of the decay of uranium, the background level of alpha particle activity is a function of the lunar crustal uranium distribution. Using radioactive radon and polonium as tracers, the Apollo 15 and 16 Command Module orbital alpha particle experiments obtained evidence for the release of gases at several sites beneath the orbit tracks, especially over the Aristarchus Plateau and Mare Fecunditatis [1]. Aristarchus crater had previously been identified by ground-based observers as the site of transient optical events [2]. The Apollo 17 surface mass spectrometer showed that argon-40 is released from the lunar interior every few ...
Date: January 1, 2001
Creator: Lawson, S. L. (Stefanie L.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

GyPSuM: A Detailed Tomographic Model of Mantle Density and Seismic Wave Speeds

Description: GyPSuM is a tomographic model fo mantle seismic shear wave (S) speeds, compressional wave (P) speeds and detailed density anomalies that drive mantle flow. the model is developed through simultaneous inversion of seismic body wave travel times (P and S) and geodynamic observations while considering realistic mineral physics parameters linking the relative behavior of mantle properties (wave speeds and density). Geodynamic observations include the (up to degree 16) global free-air gravity field, divergence of the tectonic plates, dynamic topography of the free surface, and the flow-induced excess ellipticity of the core-mantle boundary. GyPSuM is built with the philosophy that heterogeneity that most closely resembles thermal variations is the simplest possible solution. Models of the density field from Earth's free oscillations have provided great insight into the density configuration of the mantle; but are limited to very long-wavelength solutions. Alternatively, simply scaling higher resolution seismic images to density anomalies generates density fields that do not satisfy geodynamic observations. The current study provides detailed density structures in the mantle while directly satisfying geodynamic observations through a joint seismic-geodynamic inversion process. Notable density field observations include high-density piles at the base of the superplume structures, supporting the fundamental results of past normal mode studies. However, these features are more localized and lower amplitude than past studies would suggest. When we consider all seismic anomalies in GyPSuM, we find that P and S-wave speeds are strongly correlated throughout the mantle. However, correlations between the high-velocity S zones in the deep mantle ({approx} 2000 km depth) and corresponding P-wave anomalies are very low suggesting a systematic divergence from simplified thermal effects in ancient subducted slab anomalies. Nevertheless, they argue that temperature variations are the primary cause of P-wave, S-wave, and density anomalies in the mantle.
Date: March 30, 2010
Creator: Simmons, N A; Forte, A M; Boschi, L & Grand, S P
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department