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Improved Efficiency of Miscible C02 Floods and Enhanced Prospects for C02 Flooding Heterogeneous Reservoirs

Description: Surfactant and foam properties have been evaluated at high pressure using the foam durability apparatus. For a number of surfactant solutions the interfacial tension with cense CO2, critical micelle concentrations, foaming ability, and foam stability were determined. Preliminary results show that these tests correlate well to predict surfactant properties and mobility in cores. Work has also restarted in the parallel-dual permeability system.
Date: October 10, 1996
Creator: Guo, Boyn (Gordon); Schechter, David S.; Tsau, Jyun-Syung; Grigg, Reid B. & Chang, Shih-Hsien (Eric)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Electronic structure of cobalt nanocrystals suspended inliquid

Description: The electronic structure of cobalt nanocrystals suspended in liquid as a function of size has been investigated using in-situ x-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy. A sharp absorption peak associated with the ligand molecules is found that increases in intensity upon reducing the nanocrystal size. X-ray Raman features due to d-d and to charge-transfer excitations of ligand molecules are identified. The study reveals the local symmetry of the surface of {var_epsilon}-Co phase nanocrystals, which originates from a dynamic interaction between Co nanocrystals and surfactant + solvent molecules.
Date: July 16, 2007
Creator: Liu, Hongjian; Guo, Jinghua; Yin, Yadong; Augustsson, Andreas; Dong, Chungli; Nordgren, Joseph et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Surface Tension Estimates for Droplet Formation in Slurries with Low Concentrations of Hydrophobic Particles, Polymer Flocculants or Surface-Active Contaminants

Description: In support of the K-Basin project, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was requested to evaluate the appropriate surface tension value to use in models predicting the formation of droplets from spray leaks of K-Basin slurries. The specific issue was whether it was more appropriate to use the surface tension of pure water in model predictions for all plausible spray leaks or to use a lower value. The surface tension of K-Basin slurries is potentially affected not only by particles but by low concentrations of nonionic polyacrylamide flocculant and perhaps by contaminants with surfactant properties, which could decrease the surface tension below that of water. A lower surface tension value typically results in smaller droplets being formed with a larger fraction of droplets in the respirable size range, so using the higher surface tension value of pure water is not conservative and thus needs a strong technical basis.
Date: June 10, 2011
Creator: Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Blanchard, Jeremy & Bamberger, Judith A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Treatment of Produced Water Using a Surfactant Modified Zeolite/Vapor Phase Bioreactor System

Description: Co-produced water from the oil and gas industry accounts for a significant waste stream in the United States. Produced waters typically contain a high total dissolved solids content, dissolved organic constituents such as benzene and toluene, an oil and grease component as well as chemicals added during the oil-production process. It has been estimated that a total of 14 billion barrels of produced water were generated in 2002 from onshore operations (Veil, 2004). Although much of this produced water is disposed via reinjection, environmental and cost considerations can make surface discharge of this water a more practical means of disposal. In addition, reinjection is not always a feasible option because of geographic, economic, or regulatory considerations. In these situations, it may be desirable, and often necessary from a regulatory viewpoint, to treat produced water before discharge. It may also be feasible to treat waters that slightly exceed regulatory limits for re-use in arid or drought-prone areas, rather than losing them to reinjection. A previous project conducted under DOE Contract DE-AC26-99BC15221 demonstrated that surfactant modified zeolite (SMZ) represents a potential treatment technology for produced water containing BTEX. Laboratory and field experiments suggest that: (1) sorption of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX) to SMZ follows linear isotherms in which sorption increases with increasing solute hydrophobicity; (2) the presence of high salt concentrations substantially increases the capacity of the SMZ for BTEX; (3) competitive sorption among the BTEX compounds is negligible; and, (4) complete recovery of the SMZ sorption capacity for BTEX can be achieved by air sparging the SMZ. This report summarizes research for a follow on project to optimize the regeneration process for multiple sorption/regeneration cycles, and to develop and incorporate a vapor phase bioreactor (VPB) system for treatment of the off-gas generated during air sparging. To this end, we ...
Date: January 31, 2006
Creator: Katz, Lynn E.; Kinney, Kerry A.; Bowman, Robert S.; Sullivan, Enid J.; Kwon, Soondong; Darby, Elaine B. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Treatment of Produced Waters Using a Surfactant Modified Zeolite/Vapor Phase Bioreactor System

Description: This report summarizes work performed on this project from April 2004 through September 2004. Our previous work demonstrated that a polyurethane foam biofilter could successfully biodegrade the BTEX contaminants found in the SMZ regeneration waste gas stream. However, establishing the biomass on the polyurethane foam packing was relatively time consuming and daily recirculation of a concentrated nutrient solution was required for efficient operation of the foam biofilter. To simplify the start up and operating requirements of the biofilter system, a simple, compost-based biofilter was investigated for its ability to treat the BTEX contaminants generated during the SMZ regeneration process. The investigation of the compost biofilter was divided into three experimental phases that spanned 180 days of biofilter operation. During Phase 1, the biofilter was continuously supplied a BTEX-contaminated waste gas stream. During Phase 2, a series of periodic shutdown tests were conducted to assess how the biofilter responded when the BTEX feed was discontinued for periods ranging from 1 day to 2.8 days. The Phase 3 experiments focused on determining how the biofilter would handle periodic spikes in inlet BTEX concentration as would be expected when it is coupled with an SMZ column. Results from the continuous feed (Phase 1) experiments demonstrated that the compost biofilter could maintain BTEX removals of greater than 98% within two weeks of startup. Results of the shutdown experiments indicated that benzene removal was the most sensitive to interruptions in the BTEX feed. Nevertheless, the BTEX removal efficiency exceeded 95% within 6 hours of reestablishing the BTEX feed to the biofilter. When the biofilter was subjected to periodic spikes in BTEX concentration (Phase 3), it was found that the total BTEX removal efficiency stabilized at approximately 75% despite the fact that the biofilter was only fed BTEX contaminants 8 hours per day. Finally, the effects ...
Date: September 11, 2004
Creator: Katz, Lynn E.; Kinney, Kerry A.; Bowman, R. S. & Sullivan, E. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Exploitation and Optimization of Reservoir Performance in Hunton Formation, Oklahoma

Description: West Carney field--one of the newest fields discovered in Oklahoma--exhibits many unique production characteristics. These characteristics include: (1) decreasing water-oil ratio; (2) decreasing gas-oil ratio followed by an increase; (3) poor prediction capability of the reserves based on the log data; and (4) low geological connectivity but high hydrodynamic connectivity. The purpose of this investigation is to understand the principal mechanisms affecting the production, and propose methods by which we can extend the phenomenon to other fields with similar characteristics. In our experimental investigation section, we continue to describe the use of surfactant to alter the wettability of the rock. By altering the wettability, we may be able to recover additional oil through imbibition and gravity drainage process.
Date: June 30, 2006
Creator: Kelkar, Mohan
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterization of Phase and Emulsion Behavior, Surfactant Retention, and Oil Recovery for Novel Alcohol Ethoxycarboxylate Surfactants

Description: This semi-annual technical progress report describes work performed at Clark Atlanta University under DOE Grant No. DE-FG26-97FT97278 during the period October 01, 1997 to April 01, 1998 which covers the first six months of the project. During this reporting period, laboratory space to set up the surfactant characterization measurement system in the Research Science Center was made available. A Ph.D. student in Chemistry was identified and is supported as a Graduate Research Assistant in this project. Her contribution towards this project will form her Ph.D. thesis. The test matrix to perform salinity and temperature scans was established. Supply requests to obtain refined hydrocarbon, surfactant, and crude were processed and supplies obtained. A temperature bath with a control unit to perform temperature scans was obtained on loan from Federal Energy Technology Center, Morgantown, WV. The setting up of the temperature control unit, and associated chiller with water circulation lines is in progress. Tests were conducted on several hybrid surfactants to identify the best surfactants for future experimental work that yield almost equal volumes of top, middle, and bottom phases when mixed with oil and water. The student reviewed the current literature in the subject area, and modeling efforts that were established in previous studies to predict electrical conductivities and inversion phenomena. These activities resulted in one published conference paper, and one student poster paper during this reporting period.
Date: May 1, 1998
Creator: Moeti, Lebone T. & Sampath, Ramanathan
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Planning and Implementation of an Alkali-Surfactant-Polymer (ASP) Field Project

Description: The Warden ASP project has progressed from the initial planning stage to construction of an injection plant. An ASP chemical system was designed based on laboratory evaluations that included interfacial tension, mobility requirements, rock-alkali interaction, fluid capabilities, and core tests. Field cores were obtained from the Permian No. 5 and No. 6 sands on the Warden lease in Sho-Vel-Tum oil field. A separate tank battery for the pilot pattern area was installed, and a field tracer test is currently being evaluated. Tracer test results to date indicate that there is no major fracturing in the No. 5 sand. There is indication, however, of some channeling through high permeability sand. The field injection plant was designed, and construction is in progress. Several variations of injection plant design have been evaluated. Some plant design details, such as alkali storage, were found to be dependent on the availability of use equipment and project budget. The surfactant storage facility design was shown to be dependent on surfactant rheology.
Date: March 5, 1999
Creator: French, T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Optimization of Surfactant Mixtures and Their Interfacial Behavior for Advanced Oil Recovery

Description: The goal of this report is to develop improved extraction processes to mobilize and produce the oil left untapped using conventional techniques. Current chemical schemes for recovering the residual oil have been in general less than satisfactory. High cost of the processes as well as significant loss of chemicals by adsorption on reservoir materials and precipitation has limited the utility of chemical-flooding operations. There is a need to develop cost-effective, improved reagent schemes to increase recovery from domestic oil reservoirs. The goal of the report was to develop and evaluate novel mixtures of surfactants for improved oil recovery.
Date: February 27, 2001
Creator: Somasundaran, Prof. P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

CHARACTERIZATION OF PHASE AND EMULSION BEHAVIOR, SURFACTANT RETENTION, AND OIL RECOVERY FOR NOVEL ALCOHOL ETHOXYCARBOXYLATE SURFACTANTS

Description: This semi-annual technical progress report describes work performed at Clark Atlanta University under DOE Grant No. DE-FG26-97FT97278 during the period April 01, 1998 to October 01, 1998 which covers the second six months of the project. Presently work is in progress at the EOR Laboratory, Clark Atlanta University (CAU), to characterize phase and emulsion behavior for a novel, hybrid (ionic/non-ionic), alcohol ethoxycarboxylate surfactant (NEODOX 23-4 from Shell Chemical Company). During this reporting period, salinity scans were completed for 0, 5, 10, 20, 50, 100, 250, 500, 1000, 2000, 3000, 4000, 5000, and 6000 mM salt concentrations at 20, 25, and 30 °C to identify optimal salinity intervals in which all three phases coexist for this surfactant. Temperature scans were also performed at 20 mM salt concentration for various surfactant concentrations ranging from 0 to 60 weight percent at temperatures ranging from 5 to 50 °C to identify optimal surfactant concentration and temperature intervals in which all three phases coexist. This resulted in an "alpha" curve with an interval of temperature in which all three phases coexisted. Presently, temperature scans are being repeated at 100, 250, 500, 1000, and 5000 mM salt concentrations to see whether increase in salt concentration has any effect on the temperature interval. This will provide us better understanding and experimental control of the many variables involved in this research in the future. Following completion of the temperature scans, phase studies will be conducted at CAU, and coreflooding experiments at the facility of our industrial partner, Surtek, Golden, CO.
Date: November 1, 1998
Creator: MOETI, LEBONE & SAMPATH, RAMANATHAN
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Improved Efficiency of Miscible C02 Floods and Enhanced Prospects for C02 Flooding Heterogeneous Reservoirs

Description: In this quarter, we used parallel isolated composite core to test the effectiveness of foam on oil recovery efficiency. This composite core differs from the previous core in two areas: 1) Pyrex® glass beads were used in the center region to form a high permeability region and 2) a fired Berea sandstone was used in the annulus region to form a low permeability region. We also started to conduct surfactant adsorption measurements on coreflooding substrates. Static measurements with three anionic surfactants were conducted on Pyrex® glass beads. Surfactant concentrations were determined to calculate the amount of surfactant adsorbed on the substrate. The preliminary results showed that the loss of surfactant due to adsorption at 500 ppm concentration were 0.34 mg/cm 3 , 0.29 mg/cm 3 , and 0.19 mg/cm 3 for surfactants Alipa®CD128, Chaser�CD1040 and Dowfax�8390, respectively. Simulations were performed to assess the applicability of horizontal wells as a tool to increase oil recovery in CO2 injection projects.
Date: July 7, 1998
Creator: Schechter, David S. & Grigg, Reid B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Improved Efficiency of Miscible C02 Floods and Enhanced Prospects for C02 Flooding Heterogeneous Reservoirs

Description: A grant, �Improved Efficiency of Miscible CO2 Floods and Enhanced Prospects for CO2 Flooding Heterogeneous Reservoirs,� DOE Contract No. DE-FG26-97BC15047, was awarded and started on June 1, 1997. This project examines three major areas in which CO2 flooding can be improved: fluid and matrix interactions, conformance control/sweep efficiency, and reservoir simulation for improved oil recovery. In this quarter we continued the examination of synergistic effects of mixed surfactant versus single surfactant systems to enhance the properties of foams used for improving oil recovery in CO2 floods. The purpose is to reduce the concentration of surfactants and find less expensive surfactants. Also, we are refining reservoir models to handle the complex relationships of CO2-foam and heterogeneous reservoirs. The third area of our report this quarter comprises the results from experiments on CO2-assisted gravity drainage in naturally fractured oil reservoirs. Two more CO2 core flood experiments have been conducted under reservoir conditions to investigate the effect of pressure on oil recovery efficiency during CO2-assisted gravity drainage.
Date: January 23, 1997
Creator: Guo, Boyun (Gordon); Schechter, David S.; Tsau, Jyun-Syung; Grigg, Reid B. & Chang, Shih-Hsien (Eric)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A New Generation Chemical Flooding Simulator

Description: The premise of this research is that a general-purpose reservoir simulator for several improved oil recovery processes can and should be developed so that high-resolution simulations of a variety of very large and difficult problems can be achieved using state-of-the-art algorithms and computers. Such a simulator is not currently available to the industry. The goal of this proposed research is to develop a new-generation chemical flooding simulator that is capable of efficiently and accurately simulating oil reservoirs with at least a million gridblocks in less than one day on massively parallel computers. Task 1 is the formulation and development of solution scheme, Task 2 is the implementation of the chemical module, and Task 3 is validation and application. In this final report, we will detail our progress on Tasks 1 through 3 of the project.
Date: January 1, 2005
Creator: Pope, Gary A.; Sepehrnoori, Kamy & Delshad, Mojdeh
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A New Generation Chemical Flooding Simulator

Description: The premise of this research is that a general-purpose reservoir simulator for several improved oil recovery processes can and should be developed so that high-resolution simulations of a variety of very large and difficult problems can be achieved using state-of-the-art computing and computers. Such a simulator is not currently available to the industry. The goal of this proposed research is to develop a new-generation chemical flooding simulator that is capable of efficiently and accurately simulating oil reservoirs with at least a million gridblocks in less than one day on massively parallel computers. Task 1 is the formulation and development of solution scheme, Task 2 is the implementation of the chemical module, and Task 3 is validation and application.
Date: September 30, 2002
Creator: Pope, Gary A.; Sepehrnoori, Kamy & Delshad, Mojdeh
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

In Situ, Field Scale Evaluation of Surfactant Enhanced DNAPL Recovery Using a Single-Well, Push-Pull Test

Description: The overall goal of this project is to further develop the single-well, ''push-pull'' test method as a site characterization and feasibility assessment tool for studying the fundamental fate and transport behavior of injected surfactants and their ability to solubilize and mobilize DNAPLs in the subsurface. To address the three objectives, the research plan combines controlled intermediate-scale laboratory experiments in unique physical aquifer models with a parallel series of pilot-scale field experiments in existing monitoring wells at selected trichloroethylene (TCE) contaminated field sites.
Date: June 1, 1999
Creator: Istok, Jonathan D. & Field, Jennifer, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

MOLECULAR DESIGN OF COLLOIDS IN SUPERCRITICAL FLUIDS

Description: The environmentally benign, non-toxic, non-flammable fluids water and carbon dioxide (CO2) are the two most abundant and inexpensive solvents on earth. Emulsions of these fluids are of interest in many industrial processes, as well as CO2 sequestration and enhanced oil recovery. Until recently, formation of these emulsions required stabilization with fluorinated surfactants, which are expensive and often not environmentally friendly. In this work we overcame this severe limitation by developing a fundamental understanding of the properties of surfactants the CO2-water interface and using this knowledge to design and characterize emulsions stabilized with either hydrocarbon-based surfactants or nanoparticle stabilizers. We also discovered a new concept of electrostatic stabilization for CO2-based emulsions and colloids. Finally, we were able to translate our earlier work on the synthesis of silicon and germanium nanocrystals and nanowires from high temperatures and pressures to lower temperatures and ambient pressure to make the chemistry much more accessible.
Date: April 6, 2009
Creator: Johnston, Keith P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Perforated monolayers. Final report

Description: This STI is a final report for a DOE-supported program, ''Perforated Monolayers,'' which focused on the fabrication of ultrathin membranes for gas separations based on Langmuir-Blodgett chemistry.
Date: June 1, 2000
Creator: L., Regen. Steven
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Some free boundary problems in potential flow regime usinga based level set method

Description: Recent advances in the field of fluid mechanics with moving fronts are linked to the use of Level Set Methods, a versatile mathematical technique to follow free boundaries which undergo topological changes. A challenging class of problems in this context are those related to the solution of a partial differential equation posed on a moving domain, in which the boundary condition for the PDE solver has to be obtained from a partial differential equation defined on the front. This is the case of potential flow models with moving boundaries. Moreover the fluid front will possibly be carrying some material substance which will diffuse in the front and be advected by the front velocity, as for example the use of surfactants to lower surface tension. We present a Level Set based methodology to embed this partial differential equations defined on the front in a complete Eulerian framework, fully avoiding the tracking of fluid particles and its known limitations. To show the advantages of this approach in the field of Fluid Mechanics we present in this work one particular application: the numerical approximation of a potential flow model to simulate the evolution and breaking of a solitary wave propagating over a slopping bottom and compare the level set based algorithm with previous front tracking models.
Date: December 9, 2008
Creator: Garzon, M.; Bobillo-Ares, N. & Sethian, J.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Spectroscopic properties of colloidal indium phosphide quantum wires

Description: Colloidal InP quantum wires are grown by the solution-liquid-solid (SLS) method, and passivated with the traditional quantum dots surfactants 1-hexadecylamine and tri-n-octylphosphine oxide. The size dependence of the band gaps in the wires are determined from the absorption spectra, and compared to other experimental results for InP quantum dots and wires, and to the predictions of theory. The photoluminescence behavior of the wires is also investigated. Efforts to enhance photoluminescence efficiencies through photochemical etching in the presence of HF result only in photochemical thinning or photo-oxidation, without a significant influence on quantum-wire photoluminescence. However, photo-oxidation produces residual dot and rod domains within the wires, which are luminescent. The results establish that the quantum-wire band gaps are weakly influenced by the nature of the surface passivation, and that colloidal quantum wires have intrinsically low photoluminescence efficiencies.
Date: July 11, 2008
Creator: Wang, Lin-Wang; Wang, Fudong; Yu, Heng; Li, Jingbo; Hang, Qingling; Zemlyanov, Dmitry et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department