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Surface Water Data at Los Alamos National Laboratory: 2002 Water Year

Description: The principal investigators collected and computed surface water discharge data from 34 stream-gaging stations that cover most of Los Alamos National Laboratory and one at Bandelier National Monument. Also included are discharge data from three springs--two that flow into Canon de Valle and one that flows into Water Canyon--and peak flow data from 16 stations.
Date: March 3, 2003
Creator: Shaull, D.A.; Ortiz, D.; Alexander, M.R. & Romero, R.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

In-Situ Sample Preparation for Radiochemical Analyses of Surface Water

Description: A new method for improved radionuclide sample analysis of surface water has been demonstrated at the Savannah River Site, a U.S. Department of Energy production facility, currently in standby. The method makes uses of selective solid phase extraction (SPE) disks being placed in a modified portable aqueous sampler.
Date: November 12, 1998
Creator: Beals, D.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Index to U.S. Geological Survey Computer Files Containing Daily Values for Water Parameters to September 30, 1971 -- Central Region

Description: Abstract: This report contains lists of stations at which the U.S. Geological Survey collects water data either on a continuous basis or at least on a daily basis. The files contain daily values for streamflow, reservoir levels or contents, water temperatures, specific conductance, sediment discharge plus data for several other quality parameters that are measured by means of monitoring equipment or result from analyses of samples collected on a daily basis. The stations are listed according to station number within each State. The report lists the availanle retrieval options, the machine -readable output options, user charges and how to obtain data.
Date: June 1973
Creator: Showen, Charles R. & Stutmann, Neil G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Surface water data at Los Alamos National Laboratory: 1996 water year. Progress report

Description: The principle investigators collected and computed surface water discharge data from 17 stream-gaging stations that cover most of Los Alamos National Laboratory. The data show less runoff than do data for the 1995 water year. Water chemistry data from larger storm events occurring at some stations are also published here.
Date: November 1, 1996
Creator: Shaull, D.A.; Alexander, M.R.; Reynolds, R.P. & McLean, C.T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Surface Water Data at Los Alamos National Laboratory 2000 Water Year

Description: The principal investigators collected and computed surface water discharge data from 23 stream-gaging stations that cover most of Los Alamos National Laboratory and one at Bandelier National Monument. Also included are discharge data from three springs, two that flow into Canon del Valle and one that flows into Water Canyon.
Date: June 2, 2001
Creator: D.A.Shaull; M.R.Alexander; R.P.Reynolds; R.P.Romero; E.T.Riebsomer & C.T.McLean
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Calendar Year 1997 Annual Groundwater Monitoring Report For The Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime At The U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

Description: This report contains the groundwater monitoring data obtained during calendar year (CY) 1997 in compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) post-closure permit (PCP) for the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). In July 1997, the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) approved modifications to several of the permit conditions that address RCRA pow-closure corrective action groundwater monitoring at the Chestnut Ridge Security Pits (Security Pits), and RCIU4 post-closure detection groundwater monitoring at the Chestnut Ridge Sediment Disposal Basin (Sediment Disposal Basin) and Kerr Hollow Quarry. This report has been prepared in accordance with these modified permit requirements. Also included in this report are the groundwater and surface water monitoring data obtained during CY 1997 for the purposes ofi (1) detection monitoring at nonhazardous solid waste disposal facilities (SWDFS) in accordance with operating permits and applicable regulations, (2) monitoring in accordance with Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Recove~ Act Records of Decision (now pefiormed under the Integrated Water Quality Program for the Oak Ridge Reservation), and (3) monitoring needed to comply with U.S. Department of Energy Order 5400.1.
Date: February 1, 1998
Creator: Jones, S.B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Calendar Year 1997 Annual Groundwater Monitoring Report For The Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime At The U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

Description: This report contains the groundwater monitoring data obtained during calendar year (CY) 1997 in compliance with the Resource Conservation Wd Recovery Act (RCRA) post-closure permit (PCP) for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Issued by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC), the PCP defines the RCRA post-closure corrective action monitoring requirements for the portion of the groundwater contaminant plume that has migrated into the East Fork Regime ftom the S-3 Ponds, a closed RCW-regulated former surface impoundment located in Bear Creek Valley near the west end of the Y-12 Plant. In addition to the RCIL4 post-closure corrective action monitoring results, this report contains the groundwater and surface water monitoring data obtained during CY 1997 to fulfill requirements of DOE Order 5400.1.
Date: February 1, 1998
Creator: Jones, S.B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

What is "Normative" at Cooling Water Intakes? Defining Normalcy Before Judging Adverse

Description: Judgments of adverse environmental impact from cooling water intake structures need to be preceded by an appreciation of what is normal. In its repo~ Return to the River, the Independent Scientd5c Group (now called the Independent Scientfilc Advisory Board) --the scientific peer review arm of the Northwest Power Planning Council-- advanced the notion of a "normative river ecosystem" as a new conceptual foundation for salrnonid recovery in the Columbia River basin. With this perspective, the sum of the best scientific understanding of how organisms and aquatic ecosystems function should be the norm or standard of measure for how we judge the effects of human activities on aquatic systems. ,For the best likelihood of recovery, key aspects of altered systems should be brought back toward nonnative (although not necessarily fully back to the historical or pristine state); new alterations should be judged for adversity by how much they move key attributes away from normative or what might be considered normal. In this presentation, I ask what "normative" is for the setting of cooling water intake structures and how this concept could help resolve long-standing disputes between groups interested in avoiding darnage to all organisms that might be entrained or impinged and those who take a more population or community perspective for judging adverse environmental impact. In essence, I suggest that if a water intake does not move the aquatic ecosystem outside the "normative" range, based on expressions of norrrdcy such as those discussed, then no adverse impact has occurred. Having an explicit baseline in normal or normative would place 316(b) analyses on the same conceptual foundation as 316(a) analyses, which strive to demonstrate the continuation of a balanced, indigenous community of aquatic organisms at the power station Iocation.
Date: September 23, 1998
Creator: Coutant, C.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Surface water discharges from onshore stripper wells.

Description: Under current US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) rules, small onshore oil producers are allowed to discharge produced water to surface waters with approval from state agencies; but small onshore gas producers, however, are prohibited from discharging produced water to surface waters. The purpose of this report is to identify those states that allow surface water discharges from small onshore oil operations and to summarize the types of permitting controls they use. It is intended that the findings of this report will serve as a rationale to encourage the EPA to revise its rules and to remove the prohibition on surface water discharges from small gas operations.
Date: January 16, 1998
Creator: Veil, J. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Seasonally Resolved Surface Water (delta)14C Variability in the Lombok Strait: A Coralline Perspective

Description: We have explored surface water mixing in the Lombok Strait through a {approx}bimonthly resolved surface water {Delta}{sup 14}C time-series reconstructed from a coral in the Lombok Strait that spans 1937 through 1990. The prebomb surface water {Delta}{sup 14}C average is -60.5{per_thousand} and individual samples range from -72{per_thousand} to 134{per_thousand}. The annual average post-bomb maximum occurs in 1973 and is 122{per_thousand}. The timing of the post-bomb maximum is consistent with a primary subtropical source for the surface waters in the Indonesian Seas. During the post-bomb period the coral records regular seasonal cycles of 5-20{per_thousand}. Seasonal high {Delta}{sup 14}C occur during March-May (warm, low salinity), and low {Delta}{sup 14}C occur in September (cool, higher salinity). The {Delta}{sup 14}C seasonality is coherent and in phase with the seasonal {Delta}{sup 14}C cycle observed in Makassar Strait. We estimate the influence of high {Delta}{sup 14}C Makassar Strait (North Pacific) water flowing through the Lombok Strait using a two endmember mixing model and the seasonal extremes observed at the two sites. The percentage of Makassar Strait water varies between 16 and 70%, and between 1955 and 1990 it averages 40%. During La Nina events there is a higher percentage of Makassar Strait (high {Delta}{sup 14}C) water in the Lombok Strait.
Date: April 23, 2008
Creator: Guilderson, T P; Fallon, S J; Moore, M D; Schrag, D P & Charles, C D
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Surface water data at Los Alamos National Laboratory: 2008 water year

Description: The principal investigators collected and computed surface water discharge data from 69 stream-gage stations that cover most of Los Alamos National Laboratory and one at Bandelier National Monument. Also included are discharge data from three springs— two that flow into Cañon de Valle and one that flows into Water Canyon.
Date: September 1, 2009
Creator: Ortiz, David; Cata, Betsy & Kuyumjian, Gregory
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Groundwater Profession in Transition: Discovery toAdaptation

Description: Over the past century and half, groundwater has played an important role in the economic prosperity of the United States. The groundwater profession which has contributed to this prosperity has grown through the contributions of the U.S. and State Geological Surveys,academia, and industry. A century ago, the energies of the profession were channeled towards discovering new sources of groundwater in a largely unexplored land, and exploiting the resources for maximum economic benefit. Experience has since revealed that groundwater systems are finite, and are intimately linked to surface water bodies and the biosphere. A consequence is that aggressive exploitation of groundwater can lead to unacceptable environmental degradation and social cost. At present, the groundwater profession is in a state of transition from one of discovery and exploitation, to one of balancing resource development with avoiding unacceptable damage to the environment. This paper outlines the history of the groundwater profession in the United States since the late nineteenth century, and speculates on what may lie ahead in the near future, as the profession makes the transition from discovering new sources of groundwater to one of better understanding and adapting to nature's constraints.
Date: April 4, 2005
Creator: Narasimhan, T.N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Groundwater Profession in Transition: Discovery toAdaptation

Description: Over the past century and half, groundwater has played an important role in the economic prosperity of the United States. The groundwater profession which has contributed to this prosperity has grown through the contributions of the U.S. and State Geological Surveys,academia, and industry. A century ago, the energies of the profession were channeled towards discovering new sources of groundwater in a largely unexplored land, and exploiting the resources for maximum economic benefit. Experience has since revealed that groundwater systems are finite, and are intimately linked to surface water bodies and the biosphere. A consequence is that aggressive exploitation of groundwater can lead to unacceptable environmental degradation and social cost. At present, the groundwater profession is in a state of transition from one of discovery and exploitation, to one of balancing resource development with avoiding unacceptable damage to the environment. This paper outlines the history of the groundwater profession in the United States since the late nineteenth century, and speculates on what may lie ahead in the near future, as the profession makes the transition from discovering new sources of groundwater to one of better understanding and adapting to nature's constraints.
Date: April 4, 2005
Creator: Narasimhan, T.N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

129Iodine: a new tracer for surface water/groundwater interaction

Description: We measured <sup>129</sup>I/<sup>127</sup>I ratios in about 30 major rivers and found a strong signal of anthropogenic <sup>129</sup>I in all of them (Moran et al., 1998). The effect of local point sources ,such as the Savannah River Facility and Hanford Facility are easily observed in the Savannah and Columbia Rivers, respectively. Likewise, the Rhine and Rhone rivers in Switzerland, have ratios well above �background� due to their proximity to the main global source in northwest Europe. Away from local point sources, one observes a mixing trend between atmospherically-delivered <sup>129</sup>I from European nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities, and low-ratio iodine derived from soil weathering (Moran et al., 1998). This anthropogenic <sup>129</sup>I should be easily observable in soil water and shallow groundwater anywhere in the northern hemisphere.
Date: December 1, 1998
Creator: Hoehn, E; Oktay, S & Santschi, P H
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Overview of groundwater and surface water standards pertinent to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Revision 3

Description: This document presents an overview of groundwater- and surface water-related laws, regulations, agreements, guidance documents, Executive Orders, and DOE orders pertinent to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. This document is a summary and is intended to help readers understand which regulatory requirements may apply to their particular circumstances. However, the document is not intended to be used in lieu of applicable regulations. Unless otherwise noted, the information in this report reflects a summary and evaluation completed July 1, 1995. This document is considered a Living Document, and updates on changing laws and regulations will be provided.
Date: September 1, 1995
Creator: Lundahl, A.L.; Williams, S. & Grizzle, B.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Surface water data at Los Alamos National Laboratory: 1995 water year. Progress report

Description: The principle investigators collected and computed surface water discharge data from 15 stream-gaging stations that cover most of Los Alamos National Laboratory. The United States Department of Interior Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, operates two of the stations under a subcontract; these are identified in the station manuscripts. Included in this report are data from one seepage run conducted in Los Alamos Canyon during the 1995 water year.
Date: August 1, 1996
Creator: Barks, R.; Shaull, D.A.; Alexander, M.R. & Reynolds, R.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

TERRAIN: A computer program to process digital elevation models for modeling surface flow

Description: This document provides a step by step procedure, TERRAIN, for processing digital elevation models to calculate overland flow paths, watershed boundaries, slope, and aspect. The algorithms incorporated into TERRAIN have been used at two different geographic scales: first for small research watersheds where surface wetness measurements are made, and second for regional water modeling for entire counties. For small areas methods based on flow distribution may be more desirable, especially if time-dependent flow models are to be used. The main improvement in TERRAIN compared with earlier programs on which it is based is that it combines the conditioning routines, which remove depressions to avoid water storage, into a single process. Efficiency has also been improved, reducing run times as much as 10:1 and enabling the processing of very large grids in strips for regional modeling. Additionally, the ability to calculate the nutrient load delivered any cell in a watershed has been added. These improvements make TERRAIN a powerful tool for modeling surface flow.
Date: August 1, 1995
Creator: Schwartz, P.M.; Levine, D.A.; Hunsaker, C.T. & Timmins, S.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Watershed assessment and in-stream monitoring

Description: This paper provides a brief introduction to fundamental issues for watershed and regional assessments and identifies the needs for physical, chemical, and biological monitoring and research to be designed and integrated to support such assessments. Regional management requires organizing paradigms or conceptual models, and an assessment framework can serve this purpose; risk assessment is used as an example. Spatial scale (watersheds and ecoregions) can also serve as a strong organizing paradigm for management The role of federal and state monitoring and assessment programs is discussed with examples for biomonitoring. The two classes of biomonitoring methods are discussed: ecological surveys and toxicity testing. Biological criteria can provide an appropriate reference for monitoring and assessment and can establish statistical and ecological (practical) significance. This paper is based on Chapter 5 of Water Environment Federation`s new book, Biomonitoring, in the Water Environment.
Date: November 1, 1997
Creator: Hunsaker, C.T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Toxicity of Water Samples Collected in the Vicinity of F and H Seepage Basin 1990-1995

Description: Water and contaminants from the F- and H-Area Seepage Basins outcrop as shallow groundwater seeps down gradient from the basins. In 1990, 1991, 1993, 1994, and 1995, toxicity tests were performed on water collected from a number of these seeps, as well as from several locations in Fourmile Branch and several uncontaminated reference locations.
Date: September 1, 1996
Creator: Specht, W.L. & Bowers, B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Results of the Tritium Survey of Fourmile Branch and its Seeplines in the F- and H-Areas of SRS: September 1996 and 1989-1996 Trending

Description: The Environmental Sciences Section (ESS), now known as the Environmental Sciences and Technology Department (ES{ampersand}TD) of the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) conducted a quarterly monitoring program of the Fourmile Branch (FMB) stream and its associated seepline located down gradient from the F- and H-Area Seepage Basins beginning May 1992 and ending in May 1995. The quarterly tritium survey was changed to a semi-annual schedule in 1996. This report details the results of the second semi-annual event in 1996 and summarizes the tritium data beginning with the baseline 1989 and 1992 sampling events. The primary focus of this program is to measure and track changes in tritium levels. Specific conductivity and pH were also measured and tracked. The measurements from this survey (September 1996) exhibited similar tritium levels, conductivity measurements, and pH values to data from the previous tritium surveys. The results of this tritium survey and stream monitoring data (Looney et al., 1993) indicate that the tritium plume resulting from the past operation of the seepage basins continues to flush from the seeplines and wetlands to Fourmile Branch. The overall summary results indicate that the tritium plumes are surfacing in somewhat localized areas along the F-Area and 643-E seeplines.
Date: August 19, 1997
Creator: Koch, J. W., II & Dixon, K. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Results of The Tritium Survey of Fourmile Branch and its Seeplines in the F- and H-Areas of SRS: March 1996

Description: The Environmental Sciences Section (ESS) of the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) conducted a quarterly monitoring program of the Fourmile Branch (FMB) stream and its associated seepline located down gradient from the F- and H-Area Seepage Basins beginning May 1992 and ending in May 1995. The quarterly tritium survey has been changed to a semi-annual schedule, and this report details the results of the first event in FY96. The primary focus of this program is to measure and track changes in tritium levels. However, specific conductivity and pH were also measured and tracked. The measurements from this survey (March 1996) exhibited similar tritium levels, conductivity measurements, and pH values to data from the previous quarterly tritium surveys. The overall results of the tritium survey and stream monitoring data (Looney et al., 1993) indicate that the tritium plume resulting from the past operation of the seepage basins continues to flush from the seeplines and wetlands to Fourmile Branch.
Date: October 1996
Creator: Koch, J., II & Dixon, K. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Using Stratasampler{sup {alpha}} Multi-Level Wells to Examine the Hyporheic Zone within a Riparian Wetland

Description: The initial objectives of this research are to establish a baseline and monitor the influences of local scale hydrology and biogeochemical behavior within the hyporheic zone at an unimpacted, uncontaminated site.
Date: February 1998
Creator: Dunn, D. L.; Dixon, K. L.; Nichols, R. L.; Schwartzman, A. & Roseberry, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

1995 and 1996 Upper Three Runs Dye Study Data Analyses

Description: This report presents an analysis of dye tracer studies conducted on Upper Three Runs. The revised STREAM code was used to analyze these studies and derive a stream velocity and a dispersion coefficient for use in aqueous transport models. These models will be used to facilitate the establishment of aqueous effluent limits and provide contaminant transport information to emergency management in the event of a release.
Date: June 1998
Creator: Chen, K. F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department