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Surface Water Data at Los Alamos National Laboratory: 2002 Water Year

Description: The principal investigators collected and computed surface water discharge data from 34 stream-gaging stations that cover most of Los Alamos National Laboratory and one at Bandelier National Monument. Also included are discharge data from three springs--two that flow into Canon de Valle and one that flows into Water Canyon--and peak flow data from 16 stations.
Date: March 3, 2003
Creator: Shaull, D. A.; Ortiz, D.; Alexander, M. R. & Romero, R. P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Index to U.S. Geological Survey Computer Files Containing Daily Values for Water Parameters to September 30, 1971 -- Central Region

Description: Abstract: This report contains lists of stations at which the U.S. Geological Survey collects water data either on a continuous basis or at least on a daily basis. The files contain daily values for streamflow, reservoir levels or contents, water temperatures, specific conductance, sediment discharge plus data for several other quality parameters that are measured by means of monitoring equipment or result from analyses of samples collected on a daily basis. The stations are listed according to station number within each State. The report lists the availanle retrieval options, the machine -readable output options, user charges and how to obtain data.
Date: June 1973
Creator: Showen, Charles R. & Stuthmann, Neil G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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In-Situ Sample Preparation for Radiochemical Analyses of Surface Water

Description: A new method for improved radionuclide sample analysis of surface water has been demonstrated at the Savannah River Site, a U.S. Department of Energy production facility, currently in standby. The method makes uses of selective solid phase extraction (SPE) disks being placed in a modified portable aqueous sampler.
Date: November 12, 1998
Creator: Beals, D.M.; Crandall, B. S. & Fledderman, P. D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Seasonally Resolved Surface Water (delta)14C Variability in the Lombok Strait: A Coralline Perspective

Description: We have explored surface water mixing in the Lombok Strait through a {approx}bimonthly resolved surface water {Delta}{sup 14}C time-series reconstructed from a coral in the Lombok Strait that spans 1937 through 1990. The prebomb surface water {Delta}{sup 14}C average is -60.5{per_thousand} and individual samples range from -72{per_thousand} to 134{per_thousand}. The annual average post-bomb maximum occurs in 1973 and is 122{per_thousand}. The timing of the post-bomb maximum is consistent with a primary subtropical source for the surface waters in the Indonesian Seas. During the post-bomb period the coral records regular seasonal cycles of 5-20{per_thousand}. Seasonal high {Delta}{sup 14}C occur during March-May (warm, low salinity), and low {Delta}{sup 14}C occur in September (cool, higher salinity). The {Delta}{sup 14}C seasonality is coherent and in phase with the seasonal {Delta}{sup 14}C cycle observed in Makassar Strait. We estimate the influence of high {Delta}{sup 14}C Makassar Strait (North Pacific) water flowing through the Lombok Strait using a two endmember mixing model and the seasonal extremes observed at the two sites. The percentage of Makassar Strait water varies between 16 and 70%, and between 1955 and 1990 it averages 40%. During La Nina events there is a higher percentage of Makassar Strait (high {Delta}{sup 14}C) water in the Lombok Strait.
Date: April 23, 2008
Creator: Guilderson, T. P.; Fallon, S. J.; Moore, M. D.; Schrag, D. P. & Charles, C. D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Surface water data at Los Alamos National Laboratory: 2008 water year

Description: The principal investigators collected and computed surface water discharge data from 69 stream-gage stations that cover most of Los Alamos National Laboratory and one at Bandelier National Monument. Also included are discharge data from three springs— two that flow into Cañon de Valle and one that flows into Water Canyon.
Date: September 1, 2009
Creator: Ortiz, David; Cata, Betsy & Kuyumjian, Gregory
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Groundwater Profession in Transition: Discovery toAdaptation

Description: Over the past century and half, groundwater has played an important role in the economic prosperity of the United States. The groundwater profession which has contributed to this prosperity has grown through the contributions of the U.S. and State Geological Surveys,academia, and industry. A century ago, the energies of the profession were channeled towards discovering new sources of groundwater in a largely unexplored land, and exploiting the resources for maximum economic benefit. Experience has since revealed that groundwater systems are finite, and are intimately linked to surface water bodies and the biosphere. A consequence is that aggressive exploitation of groundwater can lead to unacceptable environmental degradation and social cost. At present, the groundwater profession is in a state of transition from one of discovery and exploitation, to one of balancing resource development with avoiding unacceptable damage to the environment. This paper outlines the history of the groundwater profession in the United States since the late nineteenth century, and speculates on what may lie ahead in the near future, as the profession makes the transition from discovering new sources of groundwater to one of better understanding and adapting to nature's constraints.
Date: April 4, 2005
Creator: Narasimhan, T.N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Groundwater Profession in Transition: Discovery toAdaptation

Description: Over the past century and half, groundwater has played an important role in the economic prosperity of the United States. The groundwater profession which has contributed to this prosperity has grown through the contributions of the U.S. and State Geological Surveys,academia, and industry. A century ago, the energies of the profession were channeled towards discovering new sources of groundwater in a largely unexplored land, and exploiting the resources for maximum economic benefit. Experience has since revealed that groundwater systems are finite, and are intimately linked to surface water bodies and the biosphere. A consequence is that aggressive exploitation of groundwater can lead to unacceptable environmental degradation and social cost. At present, the groundwater profession is in a state of transition from one of discovery and exploitation, to one of balancing resource development with avoiding unacceptable damage to the environment. This paper outlines the history of the groundwater profession in the United States since the late nineteenth century, and speculates on what may lie ahead in the near future, as the profession makes the transition from discovering new sources of groundwater to one of better understanding and adapting to nature's constraints.
Date: April 4, 2005
Creator: Narasimhan, T.N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

What is "Normative" at Cooling Water Intakes? Defining Normalcy Before Judging Adverse

Description: Judgments of adverse environmental impact from cooling water intake structures need to be preceded by an appreciation of what is normal. In its repo~ Return to the River, the Independent Scientd5c Group (now called the Independent Scientfilc Advisory Board) --the scientific peer review arm of the Northwest Power Planning Council-- advanced the notion of a "normative river ecosystem" as a new conceptual foundation for salrnonid recovery in the Columbia River basin. With this perspective, the sum of the best scientific understanding of how organisms and aquatic ecosystems function should be the norm or standard of measure for how we judge the effects of human activities on aquatic systems. ,For the best likelihood of recovery, key aspects of altered systems should be brought back toward nonnative (although not necessarily fully back to the historical or pristine state); new alterations should be judged for adversity by how much they move key attributes away from normative or what might be considered normal. In this presentation, I ask what "normative" is for the setting of cooling water intake structures and how this concept could help resolve long-standing disputes between groups interested in avoiding darnage to all organisms that might be entrained or impinged and those who take a more population or community perspective for judging adverse environmental impact. In essence, I suggest that if a water intake does not move the aquatic ecosystem outside the "normative" range, based on expressions of norrrdcy such as those discussed, then no adverse impact has occurred. Having an explicit baseline in normal or normative would place 316(b) analyses on the same conceptual foundation as 316(a) analyses, which strive to demonstrate the continuation of a balanced, indigenous community of aquatic organisms at the power station Iocation.
Date: September 23, 1998
Creator: Coutant, C.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Calendar Year 1997 Annual Groundwater Monitoring Report For The Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime At The U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

Description: This report contains the groundwater monitoring data obtained during calendar year (CY) 1997 in compliance with the Resource Conservation Wd Recovery Act (RCRA) post-closure permit (PCP) for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Issued by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC), the PCP defines the RCRA post-closure corrective action monitoring requirements for the portion of the groundwater contaminant plume that has migrated into the East Fork Regime ftom the S-3 Ponds, a closed RCW-regulated former surface impoundment located in Bear Creek Valley near the west end of the Y-12 Plant. In addition to the RCIL4 post-closure corrective action monitoring results, this report contains the groundwater and surface water monitoring data obtained during CY 1997 to fulfill requirements of DOE Order 5400.1.
Date: February 1, 1998
Creator: Jones, S. B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Surface water discharges from onshore stripper wells.

Description: Under current US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) rules, small onshore oil producers are allowed to discharge produced water to surface waters with approval from state agencies; but small onshore gas producers, however, are prohibited from discharging produced water to surface waters. The purpose of this report is to identify those states that allow surface water discharges from small onshore oil operations and to summarize the types of permitting controls they use. It is intended that the findings of this report will serve as a rationale to encourage the EPA to revise its rules and to remove the prohibition on surface water discharges from small gas operations.
Date: January 16, 1998
Creator: Veil, J. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Surface water data at Los Alamos National Laboratory: 1996 water year. Progress report

Description: The principle investigators collected and computed surface water discharge data from 17 stream-gaging stations that cover most of Los Alamos National Laboratory. The data show less runoff than do data for the 1995 water year. Water chemistry data from larger storm events occurring at some stations are also published here.
Date: November 1, 1996
Creator: Shaull, D.A.; Alexander, M.R.; Reynolds, R.P. & McLean, C.T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Calendar Year 1997 Annual Groundwater Monitoring Report For The Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime At The U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

Description: This report contains the groundwater monitoring data obtained during calendar year (CY) 1997 in compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) post-closure permit (PCP) for the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). In July 1997, the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) approved modifications to several of the permit conditions that address RCRA pow-closure corrective action groundwater monitoring at the Chestnut Ridge Security Pits (Security Pits), and RCIU4 post-closure detection groundwater monitoring at the Chestnut Ridge Sediment Disposal Basin (Sediment Disposal Basin) and Kerr Hollow Quarry. This report has been prepared in accordance with these modified permit requirements. Also included in this report are the groundwater and surface water monitoring data obtained during CY 1997 for the purposes ofi (1) detection monitoring at nonhazardous solid waste disposal facilities (SWDFS) in accordance with operating permits and applicable regulations, (2) monitoring in accordance with Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Recove~ Act Records of Decision (now pefiormed under the Integrated Water Quality Program for the Oak Ridge Reservation), and (3) monitoring needed to comply with U.S. Department of Energy Order 5400.1.
Date: February 1, 1998
Creator: Jones, S. B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Surface Water Data at Los Alamos National Laboratory 2000 Water Year

Description: The principal investigators collected and computed surface water discharge data from 23 stream-gaging stations that cover most of Los Alamos National Laboratory and one at Bandelier National Monument. Also included are discharge data from three springs, two that flow into Canon del Valle and one that flows into Water Canyon.
Date: June 2, 2001
Creator: D.A.Shaull; M.R.Alexander; R.P.Reynolds; R.P.Romero; E.T.Riebsomer & C.T.McLean
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

2007-2008 Annual Progress Report for BPA Grant Exp Restore Walla Walla River Flow

Description: WWBWC and its partners have been working on a wide variety of conservation and aquifer recharge related activities including: monitoring groundwater and surface water conditions, creating a geospatial database for the Walla Walla River valley (project focal area), expanding aquifer recharge testing at the HBDIC site and conducting an extensive outreach/education program by which to share the information, ideas and potential solutions to our current water management issues in this basin. This report is an outline of those activities and is accompanied by individual program-component (attached as appendices) reports for the areas that BPA is assisting to fund these on-the-ground projects along with the innovative research and monitoring being done to further aquifer recharge as a water management tool for the Pacific Northwest.
Date: July 10, 2009
Creator: Bower, Bob
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Surface Water Data at Los Alamos National Laboratory 2006 Water Year

Description: The principal investigators collected and computed surface water discharge data from 44 stream-gaging stations that cover most of Los Alamos National Laboratory and one at Bandelier National Monument. Also included are discharge data from three springs--two that flow into Canon de Valle and one that flows into Water Canyon--and peak flow data for 44 stations.
Date: August 1, 2007
Creator: R.P. Romero, D. Ortiz, G. Kuyumjian
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Data Summary Report for the 1997 Semiannual Tritium Survey for Fourmile Branch and the F- and H-Area Seeplines

Description: This report presents a summary of the definitive data validation and verification for the 1997 RFI/RI semiannual tritium survey for Fourmile Branch and the F- and H-Area Seeplines. The RFI/RI was performed under the direction of WSRC ESS/Ecology. This report was prepared under the direction EPD/EMS.
Date: January 5, 1998
Creator: Koch, J.W. II
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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South Asia Water Resources Workshop: An effort to promote water quality data sharing in South Asia

Description: To promote cooperation in South Asia on environmental research, an international working group comprised of participants from Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, and the US convened at the Soaltee Hotel in Kathmandu, Nepal, September 12 to 14, 1999. The workshop was sponsored in part by the Cooperative Monitoring Center (CMC) at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, through funding provided by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nonproliferation and National Security. The CMC promotes collaborations among scientists and researchers in regions throughout the world as a means of achieving common regional security objectives. In the long term, the workshop organizers and participants are interested in the significance of regional information sharing as a means to build confidence and reduce conflict. The intermediate interests of the group focus on activities that might eventually foster regional management of some aspects of water resources utilization. The immediate purpose of the workshop was to begin the implementation phase of a project to collect and share water quality information at a number of river and coastal estuary locations throughout the region. The workshop participants achieved four objectives: (1) gaining a better understanding of the partner organizations involved; (2) garnering the support of existing regional organizations promoting environmental cooperation in South Asia; (3) identifying sites within the region at which data is to be collected; and (4) instituting a data and information collection and sharing process.
Date: April 1, 2000
Creator: Rajen, Gaurav; Biringer, Kent L. & Betsill, J. David
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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