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Swelling behavior of halthane 73-18 polyurethane adhesive in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)

Description: To insure safe performance during the launch and flight of the W79 Artillery Fired Atomic Projectile (AFAP), the assembly gaps in the high explosive assembly were filled with a continuous film of polyurethane elastomer adhesive called Halthane 73-18. To disassemble bonded weapons like the W79, Lawrence Livermore and Mason & Hanger, Pantex Plant have developed a chemical dissolution process that safely removes the high explosive, thereby facilitating the recovery of the pit. The solvent of choice for the W79 AFAP was dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). In the W79 dissolution process, a continuous spray of DMSO is emitted through nozzles mounted in manifold assembly that encircles the HE assembly. The operating pressure and temperature of the DMSO are less than 100 psig and less than 160{degrees}F. Although warm DMSO readily dissolves the LX-10{sup 1} explosive, it cannot dissolve the Halthane 73-18 adhesive due to its chemically crosslinked structure. DMSO does, however, swell the Halthane adhesive. The resulting swollen films are soft and unable to support their own weight, yet they are not necessarily so fragile that they will tear or shred readily under the force of the DMSO spray. Indeed, the swollen Halthane films encountered in several W79 Type 6B 2048 units tested in the Pantex Workstation proved to be quite tenacious. They remained intact under the action of DMSO spray and became an encapsulating barrier that shielded the remaining undissolved HE. This effectively stopped the dissolution process, forcing manual removal in order to complete the dissolution process. By comparison, the swollen Halthane film was readily shredded and eliminated under the action of the DMSO spray nozzles in tests at LLNL in workstation of a different design. This apparent difference in response is the subject of this report.
Date: June 1, 1996
Creator: LeMay, J. D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Emissions Inventory Report Summary for Los Alamos National Laboratory for Calendar Year 2009

Description: Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is subject to annual emissions reporting requirements for regulated air pollutants under Title 20 of the New Mexico Administrative Code, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20.2.73 NMAC), Notice of Intent and Emissions Inventory Requirements. The applicability of the requirements is based on the Laboratory's potential to emit 100 tons per year of suspended particulate matter, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, sulfur oxides, or volatile organic compounds. Additionally, on April 30, 2004, LANL was issued a Title V Operating Permit from the New Mexico Environment Department/Air Quality Bureau, under 20.2.70 NMAC. This permit was modified and reissued on July 16, 2007. This Title V Operating Permit (Permit No. P-100M2) includes emission limits and operating limits for all regulated sources of air pollution at LANL. The Title V Operating Permit also requires semiannual emissions reporting for all sources included in the permit. This report summarizes both the annual emissions inventory reporting and the semiannual emissions reporting for LANL for calendar year 2009. LANL's 2009 emissions are well below the emission limits in the Title V Operating Permit.
Date: October 1, 2010
Creator: Environmental Stewardship Group
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Emissions Inventory Report Summary for Los Alamos National Laboratory for Calendar Year 2004

Description: Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is subject to annual emissions reporting requirements for regulated air pollutants under Title 20 of the New Mexico Administrative Code, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20.2.73 NMAC), ''Notice of Intent and Emissions Inventory Requirements''. The applicability of the requirements is based on the Laboratory's potential to emit 100 tons per year of suspended particulate matter, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, sulfur oxides, or volatile organic compounds. Additionally, on April 30, 2004, LANL was issued a Title V Operating Permit from the New Mexico Environment Department, Air Quality Bureau, under 20.2.70 NMAC. This Title V Operating Permit (Permit No. P-100) includes emission limits and operating limits for all regulated sources of air pollution at LANL. The Title V Operating Permit also requires semi-annual emissions reporting for all sources included in the permit. This report summarizes both the annual emissions inventory reporting and the semi-annual emissions reporting for LANL for calendar year 2004. LANL's 2004 emissions are well below the emission limits in the Title V Operating Permit.
Date: October 1, 2005
Creator: Stockton, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Emissions inventory report summary for Los Alamos National Laboratory for calendar year 2008

Description: Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is subject to annual emissions reporting requirements for regulated air pollutants under Title 20 of the New Mexico Administrative Code, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20.2.73 NMAC), Notice of Intent and Emissions Inventory Requirements. The applicability of the requirements is based on the Laboratory’s potential to emit 100 tons per year of suspended particulate matter, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, sulfur oxides, or volatile organic compounds. Additionally, on April 30, 2004, LANL was issued a Title V Operating Permit from the New Mexico Environment Department/Air Quality Bureau, under 20.2.70 NMAC. This permit was modified and reissued on July 16, 2007. This Title V Operating Permit (Permit No. P-100M2) includes emission limits and operating limits for all regulated sources of air pollution at LANL. The Title V Operating Permit also requires semiannual emissions reporting for all sources included in the permit. This report summarizes both the annual emissions inventory reporting and the semiannual emissions reporting for LANL for calendar year 2008. LANL’s 2008 emissions are well below the emission limits in the Title V Operating Permit.
Date: October 1, 2009
Creator: Group, Ecology and Air Quality
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Reaction Between Sulfuric Acid and Aliphatic Hydrocarbons. Amsco 125- 82

Description: Concentrated sulfuric acid is regularly used to remove unsaturated hydrocarbon impurities from saturated aliphatic hydrocarbons. The reaction between concentrated sulfuric acid and saturated aliphatic hydrocarbons is not so well known. A survey of the chemical literature was found to include studies that show several relatively slow reactions. Isotopic exchange with D/sub 2/SO/ sub 4/, racemization of optically active alkanes, isomerization, cleavage to alkanes of lower molecular weight, combination to compounds of higher molecular weight and the formation of SO/sub 2/ were recognized. Amsco 125-82, the diluent used in solvent extraction, reacts with sulfuric acid forming sulfur dioxide and low boiling hydrocarbon fragments. The over-all reaction probably results in the formation of more stable hydrocarbons by rearrangement. The sulfuric acid treatment can thus produce a more desirable diluent. (auth)
Date: June 1, 1960
Creator: Baldwin, W. H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Final Report: Fiscal Year 1997 demonstration of omnivorous non-thermal mixed waste treatment: Direct chemical oxidation of organic solids and liquids using peroxydisulfate

Description: Direct Chemical Oxidation (DCO) is a non-thermal, ambient pressure, aqueous-based technology for the oxidative destruction of the organic components of hazardous or mixed waste streams. The process has been developed for applications in waste treatment, chemical demilitarization and decontamination at LLNL since 1992. The process uses solutions of the peroxydisulfate ion (typically sodium or ammonium salts) to completely mineralize the organics to carbon dioxide and water. The expended oxidant may be electrolytically regenerated to minimize secondary waste. The paper briefly describes: free radical and secondary oxidant formation; electrochemical regeneration; offgas stream; and throughput.
Date: January 1, 1998
Creator: Cooper, J.F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Measurement of heterogeneous chemical processes relevant to aerosol surfaces and trace gases active in the marine environment. Progress report, February 1994--January 1995

Description: Biogenically produced reduced sulfur compounds from the marine environment, deliver a sulfur burden to the atmosphere which is about half as large as that due to sulfur oxides produced by fossil fuel combustion. The multiphase chemical processes for these species must be understood in order to evaluate the relative roles of biogenic and combustion produced sulfur oxides over the oceans. The aim of the studies funded by the subject DOE grant is to measure parameters governing the heterogeneous chemistry of the species occurring in the marine environment. During the past year, uptake studies for the sulfur species MSA, DMSO, DMSO{sub 2}, DMS, OCS, CS{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, and CH{sub 3}SH have been finalized. Studies of the reactive uptake of Cl{sub 2} and Br{sub 2} by Br{sup -} and I{sup -} solutions as a function of temperature have been completed. The uptake of O{sub 3} by aqueous NaI solutions has also been studied for the purpose of comparison. We have begun co-deposition studies and have obtained some preliminary results for the codeposition with ozone of DMS, DMSO, DMSO{sub 2} and MSA. For the next phase of the work, a new horizontal bubbler apparatus was designed and built and construction to improve the detection sensitivity of the apparatuses was begun. Altogether during 1994, 8 articles have been accepted for publication and 2 Ph.D. dissertations have been submitted and approved.
Date: February 1, 1995
Creator: Davidovits, P.; Worsnop, D.R.; Zahniser, M.S.; Jayne, J.T. & Kolb, C.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Electric Power Esearch Institute: Environmental Control Technology Center

Description: Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI`s) Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC). Testing for the month involved the EPRI Integrated SO{sub x}/NO{sub x} removal process, the DOE PRDA testing of the B&W/Condensing Heat Exchanger (CHX), and support for the Semi-Continuous On-line Mercury Analyzer. The test configuration utilized in the EPRI Integrated SO{sub x}/NO{sub x} removal process included the 4.0 MW Spray Dryer Absorber (SDA), the Pulse-jet Fabric Filter (PJFF), and a new Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) reactor installed at the ECTC. During this testing, O&M support was also required to conclude the test efforts under the EPRI Hazardous Air Pollutant (HAP) test block. This included the on-site development efforts for the Semi-Continuous On-line Mercury Analyzer. In the DOE PRDA project with the B&W/Condensing Heat Exchanger (CHX), the effects of the increased particulate loading to the unit were monitored throughout the month. Also, the 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit and the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet Scrubber remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode and were inspected regularly.
Date: November 1, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Problem free nuclear power and global change

Description: Nuclear fission power reactors represent a solution-in-principle to all aspects of global change possibly induced by inputting of either particulate or carbon or sulfur oxides into the Earth`s atmosphere. Of proven technological feasibility, they presently produce high- grade heat for electricity generation, space heating and industrial process-driving around the world, without emitting greenhouse gases or atmospheric particulates. However, a substantial number of major issues currently stand between nuclear power implemented with light- water reactors and widespread substitution for large stationary fossil fuel-fired systems, including long-term fuel supply, adverse public perceptions regarding both long-term and acute operational safety, plant decommissioning, fuel reprocessing, radwaste disposal, fissile materials diversion to military purposes and - perhaps more seriously - cost. We describe a GW-scale, high-temperature nuclear reactor heat source that can operate with no human intervention for a few decades and that may be widely acceptable, since its safety features are simple, inexpensive and easily understood. We provide first-level details of a reactor system designed to satisfy these requirements. Such a back-solving approach to realizing large-scale nuclear fission power systems potentially leads to an energy source capable of meeting all large-scale stationary demands for high- temperature heat. If widely employed to support such demands, it could, for example, directly reduce present-day world-wide CO{sub 2} emissions by two-fold; by using it to produce non-carbonaceous fuels for small mobile demands, a second two-fold reduction could be attained. Even the first such reduction would permit continued slow power-demand growth in the First World and rapid development of the Third World, both without any governmental suppression of fossil fuel usage.
Date: August 15, 1997
Creator: Teller, E.; Wood, L.; Nuckolls, J.; Ishikawa, M. & Hyde, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

High SO{sub 2} removal efficiency testing. Topical report - results of sodium formate additive tests at New York State Electric & Gas Corporation`s Kintigh Station

Description: Tests were conducted at New York State Gas & Electric`s (NYSEG`s) Kintigh Station to evaluate options for achieving high sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) removal efficiency in the wet limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system. This test program was one of six conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy to evaluate low-capital-cost upgrades to existing FGD systems as a means for utilities to comply with the requirements of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. The upgrade option tested at Kintigh was sodium formate additive. Results from the tests were used to calibrate the Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI) FGD PRocess Integration and Simulation Model (FGDPRISM) to the Kintigh scrubber configuration. FGDPRISM was then used to predict system performance for evaluating conditions other than those tested. An economic evaluation was then done to determine the cost effectiveness of various high-efficiency upgrade options. These costs can be compared with the estimated market value of SO{sub 2} allowance or the expected costs of allowances generated by other means, such as fuel switching or new scrubbers, to arrive at the most cost-effective strategy for Clean Air Act compliance.
Date: February 14, 1997
Creator: Murphy, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Low NO{sub x}/SO{sub x} Burner retrofit for utility cyclone boilers. Quarterly technical progress report, April--June 1991

Description: Work on process design was deferred pending a restart of the mainstream project activities. LNS Burner design effort was focussed mainly on the continued development of the slag screen model. Documentation of the LNS Burner thermal model also continued. Balance of plant engineering continued on the P&ID`s for the fuel preparation building HVAC system, lighter oil, limestone/fuel additive handling system, instrument and service air and fire protection systems. Work began on the preparation of system and sub-system descriptions. Schematic connection and wiring drawings and diagrams for the fuel handling system, flame scanner/igniter system and DCS control modification for the lighter oil pumps and Unit 1 circulating water pumps were completed.
Date: December 31, 1991
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Anthropogenic SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} committee--current status

Description: Current activities of the Anthropogenic SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} Committee center around the compilation of Version 1 of the GEIA inventories. These inventories will be based on the GEIA-specified 1{degrees} by 1{degrees} grid (lower left corner at 180{degrees}W/90{degrees}S, west to east and south to north), reflect 1985 emissions and consist of two data sets: Version 1A inventories with annual emissions at one level and Version 1B inventories with seasonal emissions, two vertical levels (defined at 100 m) and sectoral split information. The basic information used for both versions of the GEIA inventories will be identical; i.e., emissions totals across both inventories will be the same. Work is being carried out in two complementary working groups; Carmen Benkovitz, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY, USA heads the work on the annual inventory, Eva Voldner, Atmospheric Environment Services, Canada and Trevor Scholtz, ORTECH International, Canada, head the work on the seasonal inventory.
Date: April 1, 1993
Creator: Benkovitz, C. M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

RECOVERY OF Np-237 BY AN OXIDATION-REDUCTION FLUORIDE PRECIPITATION METHOD

Description: Several hundred grams of Np/sup 237/ in nitric acid solution was approximately 95% recovered as NpO/sub 2/ of >99.5% purity. The remaining 5% was recovered as a nitric acid solution of 99.95% purity. The neptunium was oxidized to the soluble +6 state with sodium bromate, and Pu(IV), thorium, and other impurities in the solution were precipitated as fluorides. The neptuninum was then reduced to Np(IV)) with sulfur dioxide and precipitated as KH/sub p/F/sub 5/ , dissolved in nitric acid, precipitated as neptunium oxalate, and calcined to the oxide. The recovered material balance was 99.91% with a process loss of 0.09%. (auth)
Date: April 1, 1961
Creator: Baybarz, R.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Emissions Inventory Report Summary for Los Alamos National Laboratory for Calendar Year 2006

Description: Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is subject to annual emissions reporting requirements for regulated air pollutants under Title 20 of the New Mexico Administrative Code, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20.2.73 NMAC), Notice of Intent and Emissions Inventory Requirements. The applicability of the requirements is based on the Laboratory's potential to emit 100 tons per year of suspended particulate matter, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, sulfur oxides, or volatile organic compounds. Additionally, on April 30, 2004, LANL was issued a Title V Operating Permit from the New Mexico Environment Department, Air Quality Bureau, under 20.2.70 NMAC. Modification Number 1 to this Title V Operating Permit was issued on June 15, 2006 (Permit No P-100M1) and includes emission limits and operating limits for all regulated sources of air pollution at LANL. The Title V Operating Permit also requires semi-annual emissions reporting for all sources included in the permit. This report summarizes both the annual emissions inventory reporting and the semi-annual emissions reporting for LANL for calendar year 2006. LANL's 2006 emissions are well below the emission limits in the Title V Operating Permit.
Date: September 28, 2007
Creator: Group, Ecology and Air Quality
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

JV Task-Long-Kiln NOx Reduction Study

Description: Field sampling was conducted by the Energy & Environmental Research Center at two Lafarge North America cement kiln locations in Canada. Emissions including SO{sub x}, NO{sub x}, and particulate were measured and reported at various locations throughout the kilns. At each site data were collected on two kilns during field sampling. However, only Kiln 1 at the Ravena site was utilized for modeling efforts. Experimental work was then conducted to estimate the effectiveness of various NO{sub x} control techniques on limiting both NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} emissions in cement kiln exhaust. Theory-based models were constructed to estimate both NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} emissions from cement kilns. These models were then applied to estimating the impact of various NO{sub x} control strategies on kiln exhaust emissions. The sulfur model constructed as part of this work was successful at predicting SO{sub 2} emissions and sulfur capture in the Alpena kiln. This model is designed to run as a postprocessing step that uses the output of a NO{sub x} model as input. With an accurate NO{sub x} model, the sulfur model may prove to be a valuable tool in estimating the impact of kiln modifications on sulfur emissions. The NO{sub x} model was also applied to model several operating scenarios on three of Lafarge's kilns: Alpena 20/21, Alpena 22/23, and Ravena 1. The predictions of the flue gas temperature at the kiln feed end, the kiln shell heat loss, the quality of clinker, and the excess O{sub 2} in the flue gas are consistent with the audit data. The developed simulation tool in this project has proven to be an effective way to investigate the NO{sub x} emissions, to optimize kiln performance, and to assess changes in operating condition on kiln performance.
Date: July 1, 2008
Creator: Folkedahl, Bruce; Strege, Joshua; Schmidt, Darren & Kong, Lingbu
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department