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Chemistry of Supraglacial Ponds in thte Debris-Covered Area of Lirung Glacier in Central Nepal Himalayas

Description: This article examines elevation trends and their control by seasonality, dominant geochemical processes, and season dynamics in these supraglacial ponds at elevations ranging between 3989 and 4292 m above sea level in the debris-covered area of Lirung glacier in central Nepal Himalayas, from November 2010 to October 2011 on a bimonthly basis.
Date: August 27, 2015
Creator: Bhatt, Maya P.; Takeuchi, Nozomu & Acevedo, Miguel F.
Partner: UNT College of Engineering

The Occurrence of Pyrrhotite in the Ngawha Geothermal System, New Zealand

Description: The Ngawha geothermal system is low in all sulfide minerals, but in comparison to systems in the Taupo Volcanic Zone it contains more widely distributed pyrrhotite which is currently depositing, mainly in fractures. This reflects the high proportion of vapor in the Ngawha system. Pyrrhotite is most common in the upper part of the reservoir and lower part of the aquitard. The Ngawha pyrrhotite is of monoclinic and monoclinic + hexagonal structure.
Date: January 1, 1995
Creator: Cox, M. E. & Browne, P. R. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Lode Deposits of Eureka and Vicinity, Kantishna District, Alaska

Description: From abstract: The Kantishna mining district is about 90 miles west of McKinley Park station on the Alaska Railroad. The part of the district covered by this report comprises an area of about 72 square miles in the form of a strip 6 miles wide and 13 miles long. The bedrock is mainly a metamorphic series of rocks which within the area has been differentiated into a quartz-muscovite schist and a calcareous faces that ranges from limestone to chlorite schist. A few small dikes of quartz porphyry and diabase intrude the schist. The general structure trends N. 700 E., and from an axis that extends from Eldorado Creek northeastward to Spruce Peak the schistosity dips to the northwest and southeast. It is along this axis that the heaviest mineralization has occurred.
Date: 1933
Creator: Wells, Francis G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Pyrite oxidation in saturated and Unsaturated Porous Media Flow: AComparison of alternative mathematical modeling approaches

Description: Pyrite (FeS{sub 2}) is one of the most common naturally occurring minerals that is present in many subsurface environments. It plays an important role in the genesis of enriched ore deposits through weathering reactions, is the most abundant sulfide mineral in many mine tailings, and is the primary source of acid drainage from mines and waste rock piles. The pyrite oxidation reaction serves as a prototype for oxidative weathering processes with broad significance for geoscientific, engineering, and environmental applications. Mathematical modeling of these processes is extremely challenging because aqueous concentrations of key species vary over an enormous range, oxygen inventory and supply are typically small in comparison to pyrite inventory, and chemical reactions are complex, involving kinetic control and microbial catalysis. We present the mathematical formulation of a general multi-phase advective-diffusive reactive transport model for redox processes. Two alternative implementations were made in the TOUGHREACT and TOUGH2-CHEM simulation codes which use sequential iteration and simultaneous solution, respectively. The simulators are applied to reactive consumption of pyrite in (1) saturated flow of oxidizing water, and (2) saturated-unsaturated flow in which oxygen transport occurs in both aqueous and gas phases. Geochemical evolutions predicted from different process models are compared, and issues of numerical accuracy and efficiency are discussed.
Date: February 15, 1998
Creator: Xu, Tianfu; White, Stephen P. & Pruess, Karsten
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

SUBAQUEOUS DISPOSAL OF MILL TAILINGS

Description: A study of mill tailings and sulfide minerals was carried out in order to understand their behavior under subaqueous conditions. A series of electrochemical experiments, namely, cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and galvanic coupling tests were carried out in artificial seawater and in pH 6.8 buffer solutions with chloride and ferric salts. Two mill tailings samples, one from the Kensington Mine, Alaska, and the other from the Holden Mine, Washington, were studied along with pyrite, galena, chalcopyrite and copper-activated sphalerite. SEM analysis of mill tailings revealed absence of sulfide minerals from the Kensington Mine mill tailings, whereas the Holden Mine mill tailings contained approximately 8% pyrite and 1% sphalerite. In order to conduct electrochemical tests, carbon matrix composite (CMC) electrodes of mill tailings, pyrite and galena were prepared and their feasibility was established by conducting a series of cyclic voltammetry tests. The cyclic voltammetry experiments carried out in artificial seawater and pH 6.8 buffer with chloride salts showed that chloride ions play an important role in the redox processes of sulfide minerals. For pyrite and galena, peaks were observed for the formation of chloride complexes, whereas pitting behavior was observed for the CMC electrodes of the Kensington Mine mill tailings. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy conducted in artificial seawater provided with the Nyquist plots of pyrite and galena. The Nyquist plots of pyrite and galena exhibited an inert range of potential indicating a slower rate of leaching of sulfide minerals in marine environments. The galvanic coupling experiments were carried out to study the oxidation of sulfide minerals in the absence of oxygen. It was shown that in the absence of oxygen, ferric (Fe3+) ions might oxidize the sulfide minerals, thereby releasing undesirable oxidation products in the marine environment. The source of Fe{sup 3{minus}} ions may be attributed to iron-bearing sulfide (and ...
Date: September 3, 1999
Creator: Mendiratta, Neeraj K.; Yoon, Roe-Hoan & Richardson, Paul
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

TOXIC SUBSTANCES FROM COAL COMBUSTION-FORMS OF OCCURRENCE ANALYSES. INCLUDES SEMIANNUAL REPORT FOR MARCH 31, 1998.

Description: Detailed information on trace-element modes of occurrence in coal is essential to understanding and predicting trace-element transformations taking place during coal combustion. The USGS has developed quantitative and semi-quantitative methods for determining the mode of occurrence of trace elements in coal. This information is needed to generate predictive models for trace-element behavior, the ultimate goal of this integrated study. While the USGS has a relatively small part of the overall study, the results have direct bearing on the predictive equations being developed as the primary product of this program. The USGS procedure uses an iterative selective leaching protocol on whole coals in combination with a range of complementary studies. The sequence of leaching steps, and the intended results, are as follows: (1) exchangeable cations, and a fraction of the carbonate-hosted cations are removed by ammonium acetate; (2) cations primarily associated with carbonates and monosulfides such as galena, sphalerite and chalcopyrite are removed by hydrochloric acid; (3) silicate-associated cations are removed by hydrofluoric acid; and (4) elements associated with di-sulfides (pyrite and marcasite) are removed by nitric acid. The amount of an element leached by a given reagent is compared to concentrations of that element in the whole coal to obtain the fraction of an element having the indicated residence. Elements not leached by any of the four reagents may be present in the organic portions of the coal, or in insoluble phases such as zircon or titanium dioxides. Additionally, where mineral grains are completely encased by the organic matrix, these ''shielded'' grains may not be completely digested. Quantitative results are obtained by interpreting the leaching data together with the results obtained by complementary techniques such as electron microprobe analysis.
Date: September 30, 1998
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Study of Radioiodine Sorption and Diffusion on Minerals

Description: In this paper, the performance of adsorbing and retarding 125I (substituted for 129I) for mixed minerals as buffer, backfill material was investigated. The distribution coefficient Kds by batch sorption experiments were determined for four kinds of minerals and one kind of bentonite under atmosphere. Sorption and desorption of radioiodine on several minerals were studied under low oxygen ambience at first time in the domestic, and apparent diffusion coefficient Da of 125I- was determined for mixed minerals under atmosphere. The results as follows: Distribution coefficient Kds of 125I- under atmosphere: bentonite is 3.23 ml{center_dot}g-1 , chalcopyrite is 72.42 ml{center_dot}g-1 , galena is 118.9 ml{center_dot}g-1 , pyrite is 1.93 ml{center_dot}g-1 , cinnabar is 55.48 ml{center_dot}g-1 , and the corresponding Kds under low oxygen ambience: galena is 88.48 ml{center_dot}g-1 , chalcopyrite is 6.47 ml{center_dot}g-1 . when pH of solution was in the range of 2.25-12.26, Kds of 125I- on chalcopyrite , galena, pyrite and cinnabar decreased with increase of pH under atmosphere. Kds of 125I- on several minerals increased with increase of mineral ratio in mixed materials under atmosphere. Under the same condition, Kds of 125I- on chalcopyrite and galena were larger than Kds of 125IO3 -. Sorption of 125I- on galena seems to be irreversible. Apparent diffusion coefficient Da of 125I- in the mixed material was measured by the flow-through diffusion way, Da values under atmosphere was given: Da=7.29 x 10-12 m2{center_dot}s-1 .
Date: February 26, 2002
Creator: Wucheng, X. & Xianhua, F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Iodide retention by cinnabar (HgS) and chalcocite (Cu{sub 2}S)

Description: Sorption of iodide (I{sup {minus}}) on cinnabar (HgS) and chalcocite (Cu{sub 2}S) was examined as a function of pH at 25{degrees}C in a series of batch experiments. Calculated distribution ratios (K{sub d}) far exceed those reported for other minerals; maximal K{sub d}`s of 1375 cc/g (Cu{sub 2}S) and 3080 c/g (HgS) were observed between pH 4-5, but wre substantial at all pH`s measured (4 < pH < 10). Iodide sorption apparently occurs by the formation of an insoluble surface solid solution with exposed Hg and Cu sites. Surface solid solution formation is favored at low pH due to the lessened electrostatic repulsion of the iodide ion by the sulfide surfaces.
Date: July 1, 1995
Creator: Anderson, H.L.; Balsley, S.D. & Brady, P.V.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Record of Decision Remedial Alternative Selection for the C, F, K, and P-Area Coal Pile Runoff Basins (189-C, 289-F, 189-K, and 189-P)

Description: The C-, F-, K-, and P-Area Coal Pile Runoff Basins (189-C, 289-F, 189-K, and 189-P) (C-, F-, K-, and P-CPRBs) waste units are listed as Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) 3004(u) Solid Waste Management Units/Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) units in Appendix C of the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) for the Savannah River Site (SRS). The C-, F-, K-, and P-CPRBS comprise a single operable unit which was remediated under an early removal action during the summer of 1997. Slightly elevated levels of naturally occurring metals and radionuclides in the coal-laden sediments and shallow soils were confined to the 0-1 foot interval below the basin floor. These source materials were identified as low level threat wastes. Under the Removal Site Evaluation Report/Wastewater Closure Plan for the C-, F-, K-, and P-Area Coal Pile Runoff Basins (189-C, 289-F, 189-K, and 189-P) (U) (WSRC 1997b), the coal-laden sediments and shallow soils were removed from each of the four basins during the summer of 1997. At least four feet of clean backfill was placed in each basin to restore the area to the surrounding grade. This removal action completely freed the four CPRBS of the source material for the constituents of concern and the sulfide minerals, which were reducing the pH of the infiltrate. Because the source material has been removed from the CPRBs, releases of hazardous substances will not occur from this operable unit and there is no imminent or substantial endangerment to public health, welfare, or the environment.
Date: July 1, 1998
Creator: Morgan, Randall
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Biogenic iron oxyhydroxide formation at mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal vents: Juan de Fuca Ridge

Description: Here we examine Fe speciation within Fe-encrusted biofilms formed during 2-month seafloor incubations of sulfide mineral assemblages at the Main Endeavor Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. The biofilms were distributed heterogeneously across the surface of the incubated sulfide and composed primarily of particles with a twisted stalk morphology resembling those produced by some aerobic Fe-oxidizing microorganisms. Our objectives were to determine the form of biofilm-associated Fe, and identify the sulfide minerals associated with microbial growth. We used micro-focused synchrotron-radiation X-ray fluorescence mapping (mu XRF), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (mu EXAFS), and X-ray diffraction (mu XRD) in conjunction with focused ion beam (FIB) sectioning, and highresolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The chemical and mineralogical composition of an Fe-encrusted biofilm was queried at different spatial scales, and the spatial relationship between primary sulfide and secondary oxyhydroxide minerals was resolved. The Fe-encrusted biofilms formed preferentially at pyrrhotite-rich (Fe1-xS, 0&lt;_ x&lt;_ 0.2) regions of the incubated chimney sulfide. At the nanometer spatial scale, particles within the biofilm exhibiting lattice fringing and diffraction patterns consistent with 2-line ferrihydrite were identified infrequently. At the micron spatial scale, Fe mu EXAFS spectroscopy and mu XRD measurements indicate that the dominant form of biofilm Fe is a short-range ordered Fe oxyhydroxide characterized by pervasive edge-sharing Fe-O6 octahedral linkages. Double corner-sharing Fe-O6 linkages, which are common to Fe oxyhydroxide mineral structures of 2-line ferrihydrite, 6-line ferrihydrite, and goethite, were not detected in the biogenic iron oxyhydroxide (BIO). The suspended development of the BIO mineral structure is consistent with Fe(III) hydrolysis and polymerization in the presence of high concentrations of Fe-complexing ligands. We hypothesize that microbiologically produced Fe-complexing ligands may play critical roles in both the delivery of Fe(II) to oxidases, and the limited Fe(III) oxyhydroxide crystallinity observed within the biofilm. Our research provides insight into the structure and ...
Date: May 22, 2008
Creator: Toner, Brandy M.; Santelli, Cara M.; Marcus, Matthew A.; Wirth, Richard; Chan, Clara S.; McCollom, Thomas et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evidence for the incorporation of lead into barite from waste rock pile materials

Description: Because Pb is one of the most toxic elements and is found as a major contaminant in mining environments, this study aims to identify the distribution of this element in host phases issued from the alteration of mine wastes. The sampling location was a former mine near Oakland, California (USA). This mine was once a source of sulfide minerals from which sulfuric acid was made. The material discussed in this paper was collected in iron hardpans that were formed within the waste rock pile resulting from the excavation work. In most contaminated environments (soils, mine waste), secondary metal-bearing phases arising from alteration processes are usually fine-grained (from 10 {micro}m to less than 1 {micro}m) and highly heterogeneous, requiring the use of micron-scale techniques. We performed micro-Raman spectroscopy, microscanning X-ray diffraction (SXRD), and microextended X-ray near edge spectroscopy (XANES) to determine the relationships between Pb and a Ba/Fe-rich host phase. Micro-Raman spectroscopy suggests that Pb is preferentially incorporated into barite rather than goethite. Results from micro-Raman experiments show the high sensitivity of this analytical tool to the incorporation of Pb into barite by being especially sensitive to the variations of the S-O bond and showing the characteristic bands due to the contribution of Pb. This association is confirmed and is well-illustrated by micro-SXRD mineral species maps showing the correlation between Pb and barite. Microfocused XANES indicates that Pb is present as Pb{sup 2+}, agreeing with the in situ physicochemical parameters.
Date: January 21, 2008
Creator: COURTIN-NOMADE, ALEXANDRA; SOUBRAND-COLIN, MARILYNE; MARCUS, MATTHEW A. & FAKRA, SIRINE .C
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Alternative Anode Reaction for Copper Electrowinning

Description: This report describes a project funded by the Department of Energy, with additional funding from Bechtel National, to develop a copper electrowinning process with lower costs and lower emissions than the current process. This new process also includes more energy efficient production by using catalytic-surfaced anodes and a different electrochemical couple in the electrolyte, providing an alternative oxidation reaction that requires up to 50% less energy than is currently required to electrowin the same quantity of copper. This alternative anode reaction, which oxidizes ferric ions to ferrous, with subsequent reduction back to ferric using sulfur dioxide, was demonstrated to be technically and operationally feasible. However, pure sulfur dioxide was determined to be prohibitively expensive and use of a sulfur burner, producing 12% SO{sub 2}, was deemed a viable alternative. This alternate, sulfur-burning process requires a sulfur burner, waste heat boiler, quench tower, and reaction towers. The electrolyte containing absorbed SO{sub 2} passes through activated carbon to regenerate the ferrous ion. Because this reaction produces sulfuric acid, excess acid removal by ion exchange is necessary and produces a low concentration acid suitable for leaching oxide copper minerals. If sulfide minerals are to be leached or the acid unneeded on site, hydrogen was demonstrated to be a potential reductant. Preliminary economics indicate that the process would only be viable if significant credits could be realized for electrical power produced by the sulfur burner and for acid if used for leaching of oxidized copper minerals on site.
Date: July 1, 2005
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development of the selective coagulation process

Description: The aim of this project is to develop an economical method for producing low-sulfur and low-ash coals using the selective hydrophobic coagulation (SHC) process. This work has been divided into three tasks: (1) project planning and sample acquisition; (2) studies of the fundamental mechanism(s) of the selective coagulation process and the parameters that affect the process of separating coal from both the ash-forming minerals and pyritic sulfur; and (3) bench-scale process development test work to establish the best possible method(s) of separating the hydrophobic and coagula from the dispersed mineral matter.
Date: January 1, 1991
Creator: Yoon, R.H. & Luttrell, G.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Metal-sulfide melt non-interconnectivity in silicates, even at high pressure, high temperature, and high melt fractions

Description: The authors have investigated the textural microstructure of iron-nickel-sulfur melts in contact with olivine, pyroxene, and the modified-spinel polymorph of olivine. The experiments were conducted at 1,500 C and pressures ranging from 1 to 17 GPa. For compositions more metal-rich than the monosulfide, including the eutectic composition, the metal sulfide melt has a dihedral angle greater than 60{degree} and does not form an interconnected grain-edge fluid. Increasing pressure does not measurably alter the dihedral angles. Textural evolution results in coarsening of the sulfide melt pockets, resulting in large pockets surrounded by many silicate grains and separated from one another by melt-free grain edges. Chemical communication between these large pockets is limited to lattice and grain-boundary diffusion. Due to the large interfacial energy between sulfide melt and silicates, sulfide melts are unable to separate from solid silicate via grain-boundary percolation and remain stranded in isolated melt pockets. Sulfide melt in excess of the critical melt fraction (5--25%) will develop a transient interconnectivity as sulfide collects into larger melt pockets and interconnectivity is pinched off. Efficient separation of core-forming sulfide melts from silicate requires either melting of the silicate matrix or a very large fraction of metal-sulfide melt (perhaps as large as 40%).
Date: January 1996
Creator: Minarik, W. G. & Ryerson, F. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Microbial Ecology Assessment of Mixed Copper Oxide/Sulfide Dump Leach Operation

Description: Microbial consortia composed of complex mixtures of autotrophic and heterotrophic bacteria are responsible for the dissolution of metals from sulfide minerals. Thus, an efficient copper bioleaching operation depends on the microbial ecology of the system. A microbial ecology study of a mixed oxide/sulfide copper leaching operation was conducted using an "overlay" plating technique to differentiate and identify various bacterial consortium members of the genera Thiobacillus, �Leptospirillum�, �Ferromicrobium�, and Acidiphilium. Two temperatures (30C and 45C) were used to select for mesophilic and moderately thermophilic bacteria. Cell numbers varied from 0-106 cells/g dry ore, depending on the sample location and depth. After acid curing for oxide leaching, no viable bacteria were recovered, although inoculation of cells from raffinate re-established a microbial population after three months. Due to the low pH of the operation, very few non-iron-oxidizing acidophilic heterotrophs were recovered. Moderate thermophiles were isolated from the ore samples. Pregnant liquor solutions (PLS) and raffinate both contained a diversity of bacteria. In addition, an intermittently applied waste stream that contained high levels of arsenic and fluoride was tested for toxicity. Twenty vol% waste stream in PLS killed 100% of the cells in 48 hours, indicating substantial toxicity and/or growth inhibition. The data indicate that bacteria populations can recover after acid curing, and that application of the waste stream to the dump should be avoided. Monitoring the microbial ecology of the leaching operation provided significant information that improved copper recovery.
Date: June 1, 1999
Creator: Bruhn, D. F.; Thompson, D. N. & Noah, K.S .
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Oxidative weathering chemical migration under variably saturated conditions and supergene copper enrichment

Description: Transport of oxygen gas from the land surface through an unsaturated zone has a strong influence on oxidative weathering processes. Oxidation of sulfide minerals such as pyrite (FeS{sub 2}), one of the most common naturally occurring minerals, is the primary source of acid drainage from mines and waste rock piles. Here we present a detailed numerical model of supergene copper enrichment that involves the oxidative weathering of pyrite (FeS{sub 2}) and chalcopyrite (CuFeS{sub 2}), and acidification that causes mobilization of metals in the unsaturated zone, with subsequent formation of enriched ore deposits of chalcocite (CuS) and covellite (Cu{sub 2}S) in the reducing conditions below the water table. We examine and identify some significant conceptual and computational issues regarding the oxidative weathering processes through the modeling tool. The dissolution of gaseous oxygen induced by the oxidation reduces oxygen partial pressure, as well as the total pressure of the gas phase. As a result, the gas flow is modified, then the liquid phase flow. Results indicate that this reaction effect on the fluid flow may not be important under ambient conditions, and gas diffusion can be a more important mechanism for oxygen supply than gas or liquid advection. Acidification, mobilization of metals, and alteration of primary minerals mostly take place in unsaturated zone (oxidizing), while precipitation of secondary minerals mainly occurs in saturated zone (reducing). The water table may be considered as an interface between oxidizing and reducing zones. Moving water table due to change of infiltration results in moving oxidizing zone and redistributing aqueous chemical constitutes and secondary mineral deposits. The oxidative weathering processes are difficult to model numerically, because concentrations of redox sensitive chemical species such as O{sub 2}(aq), SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} and HS{sup -} may change over tens of orders of magnitude between oxidizing and reducing conditions. In order ...
Date: April 1, 1999
Creator: Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, K. & Brimhall, G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development of enhanced sulfur rejection processes

Description: Research at Virginia Tech led to two complementary concepts for improving the removal of inorganic sulfur from much of the Eastern US coals. One controls the surface properties of coal pyrite (FeS[sub 2]) by electrochemical-.potential control, referred to as the Electrochemically Enhanced Sulfur Rejection (EESR) Process: The second controls the flotation of middlings, i.e., particles composed of pyrite with coal inclusions by using polymeric reagents to react with pyrite and convert the middlings to hydrophilic particles, and is termed the Polymer Enhanced Sulfur Rejection (PESR) Process. These new concepts are based on recent research establishing the two main reasons why flotation fails to remove more than about 50% of the pyritic sulfur from coal: superficial oxidization of liberated pyrite to form polysulfide oxidation products so that a part of the liberated pyrite floats with the coal; and hydrophobic coal inclusions in the middlings dominating their flotation so that the middlings also float with the coal. These new pyritic-sulfur rejection processes do not require significant modifications of existing coal preparation facilities, enhancing their adoptability by the coal industry. It is believed that they can be used simultaneously to achieve both free pyrite and locked pyrite rejection.
Date: March 23, 1993
Creator: Yoon, R.H.; Luttrell, G.; Adel, G. & Richardson, P.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Perrhenate and Pertechnetate Behavior on Iron and Sulfur-Bearing Compounds.

Description: Investigations on the behavior of the radioactive element technetium frequently use a stable isotope of rhenium as an analogue. This is justified by citing the elements similar radii and major oxidation states of +7 and +4. However, at least one study [1] has shown this analogy to be imperfect. Therefore, one goal of our study is to compare the adsorption behavior of perrhenate and pertechnetate (the major forms of Re and Tc in natural waters) on a number of different mineral surfaces. Quantum mechanical calculations were performed on the adsorption of these two anions on a series of iron oxides and sulfides. With these calculations, we gain insight into any differences between the anions adsorption behavior, including geometry, adsorption energies, and electronic structure such as density of states and orbital shapes and energies at the adsorption site. Differences between interactions on terraces and step edges, the effects of co-adsorbates such as Na{sup +} or H{sup +}, and possible reduction mechanisms are also explored. The influence of water was calculated using homogeneous dielectric fluids and explicit water molecules. As a complement to the calculations, batch sorption tests are in progress involving ReO{sub 4}{sup -}/TcO{sub 4}{sup -} solution in contact with Fe metal, 10% Fe-doped hydroxyapatite, goethite, hematite, magnetite, pyrite, galena, and sphalerite.
Date: September 15, 2006
Creator: Anderson, B. E.; Becker, U.; Helean, K. B. & Ewing, R. C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Microbial Ecology Assessment of Mixed Copper Oxide/Sulfide Dump Leach Operation

Description: Microbial consortia composed of complex mixtures of autotrophic and heterotrophic bacteria are responsible for the dissolution of metals from sulfide minerals. Thus, an efficient copper bioleaching operation depends on the microbial ecology of the system. A microbial ecology study of a mixed oxide/sulfide copper leaching operation was conducted using an "overlay" plating technique to differentiate and identify various bacterial consortium members of the genera Thiobacillus, “Leptospirillum”, “Ferromicrobium”, and Acidiphilium. Two temperatures (30°C and 45°C) were used to select for mesophilic and moderately thermophilic bacteria. Cell numbers varied from 0-106 cells/g dry ore, depending on the sample location and depth. After acid curing for oxide leaching, no viable bacteria were recovered, although inoculation of cells from raffinate re-established a microbial population after three months. Due to low the pH of the operation, very few non-iron-oxidizing acidophilic heterotrophs were recovered. Moderate thermophiles were isolated from the ore samples. Pregnant liquor solutions (PLS) and raffinate both contained a diversity of bacteria. In addition, an intermittently applied waste stream that contained high levels of arsenic and fluoride was tested for toxicity. Twenty vol% waste stream in PLS killed 100% of the cells in 48 hours, indicating substantial toxicity and/or growth inhibition. The data indicate that bacteria populations can recover after acid curing, and that application of the waste stream to the dump should be avoided. Monitoring the microbial ecology of the leaching operation provided significant information that improved copper recovery.
Date: June 1, 1999
Creator: Bruhn, Debby Fox; Thompson, David Neal & Noah, Karl Scott
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Mississippian Leadville Limestone Exploration Play, Utah and Colorado-Exploration Techniques and Studies for Independents

Description: The Mississippian (late Kinderhookian to early Meramecian) Leadville Limestone is a shallow, open-marine, carbonate-shelf deposit. The Leadville has produced over 53 million barrels (8.4 million m{sup 3}) of oil/condensate from seven fields in the Paradox fold and fault belt of the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. The environmentally sensitive, 7500-square-mile (19,400 km{sup 2}) area that makes up the fold and fault belt is relatively unexplored. Only independent producers operate and continue to hunt for Leadville oil targets in the region. The overall goal of this study is to assist these independents by (1) developing and demonstrating techniques and exploration methods never tried on the Leadville Limestone, (2) targeting areas for exploration, (3) increasing deliverability from new and old Leadville fields through detailed reservoir characterization, (4) reducing exploration costs and risk especially in environmentally sensitive areas, and (5) adding new oil discoveries and reserves. The final results will hopefully reduce exploration costs and risks, especially in environmentally sensitive areas, and add new oil discoveries and reserves. The study consists of three sections: (1) description of lithofacies and diagenetic history of the Leadville at Lisbon field, San Juan County, Utah, (2) methodology and results of a surface geochemical survey conducted over the Lisbon and Lightning Draw Southeast fields (and areas in between) and identification of oil-prone areas using epifluorescence in well cuttings from regional wells, and (3) determination of regional lithofacies, description of modern and outcrop depositional analogs, and estimation of potential oil migration directions (evaluating the middle Paleozoic hydrodynamic pressure regime and water chemistry). Leadville lithofacies at Libon field include open marine (crinoidal banks or shoals and Waulsortian-type buildups), oolitic and peloid shoals, and middle shelf. Rock units with open-marine and restricted-marine facies constitute a significant reservoir potential, having both effective porosity and permeability when dissolution of skeletal grains, followed by ...
Date: September 30, 2008
Creator: Chidsey, Thomas
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Monitoring Acidophilic Microbes with Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) Assays

Description: Many techniques that are used to characterize and monitor microbial populations associated with sulfide mineral bioleaching require the cultivation of the organisms on solid or liquid media. Chemolithotrophic species, such as Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and Leptospirillum ferrooxidans, or thermophilic chemolithotrophs, such as Acidianus brierleyi and Sulfolobus solfataricus can grow quite slowly, requiring weeks to complete efforts to identify and quantify these microbes associated with bioleach samples. Real-time PCR (polymerase chain reaction) assays in which DNA targets are amplified in the presence of fluorescent oligonucleotide primers, allowing the monitoring and quantification of the amplification reactions as they progress, provide a means of rapidly detecting the presence of microbial species of interest, and their relative abundance in a sample. This presentation will describe the design and use of such assays to monitor acidophilic microbes in the environment and in bioleaching operations. These assays provide results within 2-3 hours, and can detect less than 100 individual microbial cells.
Date: August 1, 2008
Creator: Roberto, Frank F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Performance Evaluation of In-Situ Iron Reactive Barriers at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Site

Description: In November 1997, a permeable iron reactive barrier trench was installed at the S-3 Ponds Pathway 2 Site located at the Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The overall goal of the project is to evaluate the ability of permeable reactive barrier technology to remove uranium, nitrate, and other inorganic contaminants in groundwater and to assess impacts of biogeochemical interactions on long-term performance of the treatment system. Zero-valent iron (Fe0) was used as the reactive medium, which creates a localized zone of reduction or low oxidation reduction potential (ORP), elevated pH, and dissolved H{sub 2} as Fe{sup 0} corrodes in groundwater. These conditions favor the removal of metals and radionuclides (such as uranium and technetium) through redox-driven precipitation and/or sorption to iron corrosion byproducts, such as iron oxyhydroxides. The technology is anticipated to be economical and low in maintenance as compared with conventional pump-and-treat technology. Groundwater monitoring results indicate that the iron barrier is effectively removing uranium and technetium, the primary contaminants of concern, as anticipated from our previous laboratory studies. In addition to uranium and technetium, nitrate, sulfate, bicarbonate, calcium, and magnesium are also found to be removed, either partially or completely by the iron barrier. Elevated concentrations of ferrous ions and sulfide, and pH were observed within the iron barrier. Although ferrous iron concentrations were initially very high after barrier installation, ferrous ion concentrations have decreased to low to non-detectable levels as the pH within the iron has increased over time (as high as 9 or 10). Iron and soil core samples were taken in February 1999 and May 2000 in order to evaluate the iron surface passivation, morphology, mineral precipitation and cementation, and microbial activity within and in the vicinity of the iron barrier. Results indicate that most of the iron filings collected in cores were still loose ...
Date: December 30, 2003
Creator: Watson, D.B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Enhancement of surface properties for coal beneficiation

Description: This report will focus on means of pyrite removal from coal using surface-based coal cleaning technologies. The major subjects being addressed in this study are the natural and modulated surface properties of coal and pyrite and how they may best be utilized to facilitate their separation using advanced surface-based coal cleaning technology. Emphasis is based on modified flotation and oil agglomerative processes and the basic principles involved. The four areas being addressed are: (1) Collectorless flotation of pyrite; (2) Modulation of pyrite and coal hydrophobicity; (3) Emulsion processes and principles; (4) Evaluation of coal hydrophobicity.
Date: January 30, 1992
Creator: Chander, S. & Aplan, F.F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Engineering development of selective agglomeration: Task 7, Evaluation of bench-scale and component tests

Description: This report presents the Task 7 findings of the project entitled Engineering Development of Selective Agglomeration'' to develop selective agglomeration technology to a commercially acceptable level by 1992. The objectives of this report are to summarize the work completed as a part of Task 7, which includes engineering analysis of process deficiencies, analysis of all project test results, and evaluation and selection of an agglomeration process for further development in Phase II. Other objectives of this task included evaluation of the selective agglomeration technology and analysis of all the major deficiencies remaining at the conclusion of Phase I of the project. An overview of the agglomeration processes that were under consideration is presented, along with a discussion of the various test parameters that were found to be important during project testing. This report includes a comprehensive evaluation of all test data and a summary of the major findings; it also provides characterization data for all the project coals and presents the agglomeration process selected for Phase II along with a discussion of the criteria and rationale for the selection.
Date: November 1, 1991
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department