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Final technical report

Description: This project sought to develop new means of creating variation in the structure of starch that accumulates in maize seeds, through manipulation of the enzyme starch synthase III (SSIII). The central hypothesis was that SSIII is responsible for construction of certain lengths of linear glucan chains within the major starch component amylopectin, and that manipulation of this enzyme could create new varieties of starch that might have novel utilities as a renewable resource. The hypothesis was proven to be true through analysis of the effects of maize du1- mutations, which affect the structure and function of SSIII. SSIII was found to be required for the formation for two distinct groups of chain lengths in maize amylopectin, specifically those containing 7-9 glucose units and those containing 37-55 glucose units. Decrease in the frequency of these chains, as compared to wild type, is accompanied by an increase in chains of 11-15 glucose units. A hypothesis consistent with these data is that one of the other SS isoforms produces chains in the range of 11-15 units, and these are then elongated by SSIII to the range of 37-55 units. In order to try to manipulate the activity of SSIII in novel ways, transgenic maize plants were constructed in which the presumed regulatory part of the protein was detached from the known catalytic region responsible for synthesis of linear glucan chains within starch. Three different transgenes were introduced into maize, each containing different truncated versions of SSIII. Transgenic plants were followed over several generations, and their structure of their starches were analyzed. Novel structures were in fact observed. Specifically, there was a large increase in the frequency of chains containing 9-15 glucose units as compared two wild type maize starch, and a decrease in the frequency of those with 18-30 units. These structures of ...
Date: June 8, 2004
Creator: Myers, Alan & James, Martha
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Final Report

Description: This report describes basic science studies of conversion of starch to sucrose in plant leaves. The importance of maltose is described. The studies proved that hydrolysis of the starch is more important than phosphorolysis.
Date: February 7, 2005
Creator: Sharkey, Thomas D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Maltose Biochemistry and Transport in Plant Leaves

Description: Starch is a desirable plant product for both food and biofuel. Leaf starch is ideal for use in biofuels because it does not compete with grain starch, which is used for food. Starch is accumulated in plant leaves during the day and broken down at night. If we can manipulate leaf starch breakdown it may be possible to design a plant that provides both grain starch for food and leaf starch for biofuel. The pathway of leaf starch breakdown was not known when this work started. Preliminary evidence had shown that maltose was the primary product of leaf starch breakdown (Weise, Weber & Sharkey, 2004) and that it was metabolized by a disproportionating enzyme called amylomaltase but given the initials DPE2 (Lu & Sharkey, 2004). In this work we showed that only one form of maltose was metabolically active (Weise et al., 2005a) and that maltose was located in two different places when the amylomaltase was knocked out but only inside the chloroplast when the maltose transporter was knocked out (Lu et al., 2006a). This allowed us to estimate the energetics of maltose export and to show that maltose export is more efficient than glucose export (Weise et al., 2005b). We examined how daylength affected starch breakdown rate and found that starch breakdown rate could respond to changes in daylength within one day (Lu, Gehan & Sharkey, 2005). We also were able to show a second starch breakdown pathway by chloroplastic starch phosphorylase (Weise et al., 2006). Work to this point was summarized in a review (Lu & Sharkey, 2006). We were able to show that the amylomaltase in plants could substitute for the amylomaltase in bacteria (Lu et al., 2006b). In this paper we also showed the importance of a second enzyme called alpha-glucan phosphorylase in starch breakdown. Finally, ...
Date: May 3, 2012
Creator: Sharkey, Thomas D
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Maltose Biochemistry and Transport in Plant Leaves

Description: Transitory starch builds up in photosynthesizing leaves during the day and is then degraded each night. It has recently been shown through mutant analysis and genetically engineered plants that transitory starch is required for maximal rates of photosynthesis, especially in high carbon dioxide atmospheres. Understanding the pathway by which carbon is exported from chloroplasts at night is limited. Previous work has shown that starch conversion to sucrose at night involves maltose export from chloroplasts. This pathway for carbon export from chloroplasts normally does not occur during the day. The regulation of maltose formation, the transporters that allow export of maltose from the chloroplast, and the cytosolic reactions by which maltose is converted to sucrose remain obscure. Genomic and biochemical approaches are proposed here to address maltose metabolism and transport. The research will cover three areas (1) how are hydrolytic and phosphorylytic starch degradation regulated, (2) how is maltose exported from chloroplasts, and (3) how is maltose converted to sucrose in the cytosol? It is expected that this research will lead to new insights about photosynthesis at high carbon dioxide levels, how carbon is partitioned in plants, and how partitioning can be altered to adapt plants to human needs.
Date: April 25, 2008
Creator: Weber, Andreas P.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Molecular Genetic Analysis of Maize Starch Branching Isoforms: Modulation of Starch Branching Enzyme Isoform Activities in Maize to Produce Starch with Novel Branching Architecture and Properties

Description: Modulation of Starch Branching enzyme Isoform Activities in Maize to Produce Starch with Novel Branching Architecture and Properties.
Date: July 21, 2009
Creator: Guiltinan, Mark J. & Thompson, Donald
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

How to Select Foods: [Part] 2. Cereal Foods

Description: "The present bulletin deals with foods rich in starch and particularly with the cereals and foods made from them. These are mild-flavored, comparatively inexpensive foods which yield energy to the body. They also yield varying amounts of tissue-building and body-regulating substances. If they are combined with well-chosen materials from the other foods groups, they can be used safely as the main part of the ration. With wise planning such a diet can be made adequate, attractive, and at the same time economical." -- p. 2
Date: 1917
Creator: Hunt, Caroline Louisa, 1865-1927 & Atwater, Helen W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Maltose Biochemistry and Transport in Plant Leaves

Description: Final Technical Report for DOE grant DE-FG02-04ER15565 Maltose Biochemistry and Transport in Plant Leaves PI Thomas D. Sharkey University of Wisconsin-Madison Starch is a desirable plant product for both food and biofuel. Leaf starch is ideal for use in biofuels because it does not compete with grain starch, which is used for food. Starch is accumulated in plant leaves during the day and broken down at night. If we can manipulate leaf starch breakdown it may be possible to design a plant that provides both grain starch for food and leaf starch for biofuel. The pathway of leaf starch breakdown was not known when this work started. Preliminary evidence had shown that maltose was the primary product of leaf starch breakdown (Weise, Weber & Sharkey, 2004) and that it was metabolized by a disproportionating enzyme called amylomaltase but given the initials DPE2 (Lu & Sharkey, 2004). In this work we showed that only one form of maltose was metabolically active (Weise et al., 2005a) and that maltose was located in two different places when the amylomaltase was knocked out but only inside the chloroplast when the maltose transporter was knocked out (Lu et al., 2006a). This allowed us to estimate the energetics of maltose export and to show that maltose export is more efficient than glucose export (Weise et al., 2005b). We examined how daylength affected starch breakdown rate and found that starch breakdown rate could respond to changes in daylength within one day (Lu, Gehan & Sharkey, 2005). We also were able to show a second starch breakdown pathway by chloroplastic starch phosphorylase (Weise et al., 2006). Work to this point was summarized in a review (Lu & Sharkey, 2006). We were able to show that the amylomaltase in plants could substitute for the amylomaltase in bacteria (Lu et ...
Date: January 28, 2010
Creator: Sharkey, Thomas D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Sugar-mediated semidian oscillation of gene expression in the cassava storage root regulates starch synthesis

Description: Starch branching enzyme (SBE) activity in the cassava storage root exhibited a diurnal fluctuation, dictated by a transcriptional oscillation of the corresponding SBE genes. The peak of SBE activity coincided with the onset of sucrose accumulation in the storage, and we conclude that the oscillatory mechanism keeps the starch synthetic apparatus in the storage root sink in tune with the flux of sucrose from the photosynthetic source. When storage roots were uncoupled from the source, SBE expression could be effectively induced by exogenous sucrose. Turanose, a sucrose isomer that cannot be metabolized by plants, mimicked the effect of sucrose, demonstrating that downstream metabolism of sucrose was not necessary for signal transmission. Also glucose and glucose-1-P induced SBE expression. Interestingly, induction by sucrose, turanose and glucose but not glucose-1-P sustained an overt semidian (12-h) oscillation in SBE expression and was sensitive to the hexokinase (HXK) inhibitor glucosamine. These results suggest a pivotal regulatory role for HXK during starch synthesis. Abscisic acid (ABA) was another potent inducer of SBE expression. Induction by ABA was similar to that of glucose-1-P in that it bypassed the semidian oscillator. Both the sugar and ABA signaling cascades were disrupted by okadaic acid, a protein phosphatase inhibitor. Based on these findings, we propose a model for sugar signaling in regulation of starch synthesis in the cassava storage root.
Date: January 15, 2008
Creator: Jansson, Christer; Baguma, Yona; Sun, Chuanxin; Boren, Mats; Olsson, Helena; Rosenqvist, Sara et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Diurnal oscillation of SBE expression in sorghum endosperm

Description: Spatial and temporal expression patterns of the sorghum SBEI, SBEIIA and SBEIIB genes, encoding, respectively, starch branching enzyme (SBE) I, IIA and IIB, in the developing endosperm of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) were studied. Full-length genomic and cDNA clones for sorghum was cloned and the SBEIIA cDNA was used together with gene-specific probes for sorghum SBEIIB and SBEI. In contrast to sorghum SBEIIB, which was expressed primarily in endosperm and embryo, SBEIIA was expressed also in vegetative tissues. All three genes shared a similar temporal expression profile during endosperm development, with a maximum activity at 15-24 days after pollination. This is different from barley and maize where SBEI gene activity showed a significantly later onset compared to that of SBEIIA and SBEIIB. Expression of the three SBE genes in the sorghum endosperm exhibited a diurnal rhythm during a 24-h cycle.
Date: January 15, 2009
Creator: Sun, Chuanxin; Mutisya, J.; Rosenquist, S.; Baguma, Y. & Jansson, C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Ethanol production from dry-mill corn starch in a fluidized-bed bioreactor

Description: The development of a high-rate process for the production of fuel ethanol from dry-mill corn starch using fluidized-bed bioreactor (FBR) technology is discussed. Experiments were conducted in a laboratory scale FBR using immobilized biocatalysts. Two ethanol production process designs were considered in this study. In the first design, simultaneous saccharification and fermentation was performed at 35 C using {kappa}-carageenan beads (1.5 mm to 1.5 mm in diameter) of co-immobilized glucoamylase and Zymomonas mobilis. For dextrin feed concentration of 100 g/L, the single-pass conversion ranged from 54% to 89%. Ethanol concentrations of 23 to 36 g/L were obtained at volumetric productivities of 9 to 15 g/L-h. No accumulation of glucose was observed, indicating that saccharification was the rate-limiting step. In the second design, saccharification and fermentation were carried out sequentially. In the first stage, solutions of 150 to 160 g/L dextrins were pumped through an immobilized glucoamylase packed column maintained at 55 C. Greater than 95% conversion was obtained at a residence time of 1 h, giving a product of 165 to 170 g glucose/L. In the second stage, these glucose solutions were fed to the FBR containing Z. mobilis immobilized in {kappa}-carageenan beads. At a residence time of 2 h, 94% conversion and ethanol concentration of 70 g/L was achieved, giving an overall productivity of 23 g/L-h.
Date: August 1, 1998
Creator: Krishnan, M. S.; Nghiem, N. P. & Davison, B. H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Injection Molding of Plastics from Agricultural Materials

Description: The objective of this research was to conduct a systematic study to relate injection molding parameters to properties of blends of starch and synthetic polymer. From this study, we wished to develop a thorough understanding of the injection molding process and gain significant insight into designing molds and aiding in developing products cheaply and efficiently.
Date: February 22, 2001
Creator: Bhattacharya, M. & Ruan, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development of a performance-based industrial energy efficiency indicator for corn refining plants.

Description: Organizations that implement strategic energy management programs have the potential to achieve sustained energy savings if the programs are carried out properly. A key opportunity for achieving energy savings that plant managers can take is to determine an appropriate level of energy performance by comparing their plant's performance with that of similar plants in the same industry. Manufacturing facilities can set energy efficiency targets by using performance-based indicators. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), through its ENERGY STAR{reg_sign} program, has been developing plant energy performance indicators (EPIs) to encourage a variety of U.S. industries to use energy more efficiently. This report describes work with the corn refining industry to provide a plant-level indicator of energy efficiency for facilities that produce a variety of products--including corn starch, corn oil, animal feed, corn sweeteners, and ethanol--for the paper, food, beverage, and other industries in the United States. Consideration is given to the role that performance-based indicators play in motivating change; the steps needed to develop indicators, including interacting with an industry to secure adequate data for an indicator; and the actual application and use of an indicator when complete. How indicators are employed in the EPA's efforts to encourage industries to voluntarily improve their use of energy is discussed as well. The report describes the data and statistical methods used to construct the EPI for corn refining plants. Individual equations are presented, as are the instructions for using them in an associated Excel spreadsheet.
Date: July 31, 2006
Creator: Boyd, G. A.; Sciences, Decision and Information & USEPA
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Continuous Ethanol Production Using Immobilized-Cell/Enzyme Biocatalysts in Fluidized-Bed Bioreactor (FBR)

Description: The immobilized-cell fluidized-bed bioreactor (FBR) was developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Previous studies at ORNL using immobilized Zymomonas mobilis in FBR at both laboratory and demonstration scale (4-in-ID by 20-ft-tall) have shown that the system was more than 50 times as productive as industrial benchmarks (batch and fed-batch free cell fermentations for ethanol production from glucose). Economic analysis showed that a continuous process employing the FBR technology to produce ethanol from corn-derived glucose would offer savings of three to six cents per gallon of ethanol compared to a typical batch process. The application of the FBR technology for ethanol production was extended to investigate more complex feedstocks, which included starch and lignocellulosic-derived mixed sugars. Economic analysis and mathematical modeling of the reactor were included in the investigation. This report summarizes the results of these extensive studies.
Date: November 16, 2003
Creator: Nghiem, NP
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A low-energy continuous reactor-separator for ethanol from starch, whey permeate, permeate mother liquor, molasses or cellulosics. Project final report, April 1, 1994--February 28, 1997

Description: In this project, a novel bio-reactor technology in which reaction is coupled with product separation was developed to pilot/demonstration scale. Combining reaction with separation during a fermentation allows the fermentation of highly concentrated feeds and allows the fermentation of streams with high levels of salts/non-fermentable inhibitors. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of polysaccharides such as starch and cellulose can also be combined with ethanol separation in the Continuous Stirred Reactor Separator (CSRS). Application of the bio-reactor to various substrates was investigated on a lab scale with fermentation of raw starch, cane molasses, xylose, whey permeate and permeate mother liquor. Flocculating yeast strains for high density sucrose/glucose fermentation were selected and adapted to form fast settling pellets. A strain of K marxianus capable of fermenting high salt permeate mother liquor was also selected and adapted. A low energy solvent ethanol recovery system was developed for ethanol recovery from the vapors leaving the reactor/separator. This Solvent Absorption/Extractive Distillation (SAED) process gives a low energy method for purifying the ethanol to an anhydrous product. The amount of energy needed to recover an anhydrous ethanol product from a CSRS stage running at 8% ethanol was calculated to be under 8,000 BTU/gallon. This process may also have further application in VOC (volatile organic carbon compounds) removal from air streams. During this project, a 24,000 Liter CSRS was designed, fabricated, installed, and operated at a small batch ethanol plant (Permeate Refining Inc) in NE Iowa. The reactor was operated on a semi-continuous basis over a period of 18 months. A Solvent Absorption Extractive Distillation (SAED) system was also recently completed and installed at the Permeate Refining Inc. site for ethanol recovery/dehydration.
Date: April 14, 1997
Creator: Dale, M.C. & Moelhman, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Production of a pellet fuel from Illinois coal fines. Technical report, March 1--May 31, 1995

Description: The primary goal of this research is to produce a pellet fuel from low-sulfur Illinois coal fines which could burn with emissions of less than 1.8 lbs SO{sub 2}/10{sup 6} Btu in stoker-fired boilers. The significance of 1.8 lbs SO{sub 2}/10{sup 6} Btu is that in the Chicago (9 counties) and St. Louis (2 counties) metropolitan areas, industrial users of coal currently must comply with this level of emissions. For this effort, we will be investigating the use of fines from two Illinois mines which currently mine relatively low-sulfur reserves and that discard their fines fraction (minus 100 mesh). The research will involve investigation of multiple unit operations including column flotation, filtration and pellet production. The end result of the effort will allow for an evaluation of the commercial viability of the approach. Previously it has been decided that corn starch would be used as binder and a roller-and-die mill would be used for pellet manufacture. A quality starch binder has been identified and tested. To potentially lower binder costs, a starch that costs about 50% of the high quality starch was tested. Results indicate that the lower cost starch will not lower binder cost because more is required to produce a comparable quality pellet. Also, a petroleum in water emulsion was evaluated as a potential binder. The compound seemed to have adhesive properties but was found to be a poor binder. Arrangements have been made to collect a waste slurry from the mine previously described.
Date: December 31, 1995
Creator: Rapp, D. & Lytle, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Production of a pellet fuel from Illinois coal mines. Quarterly report, 1 December 1994--28 February 1995

Description: The goal of this research is to produce a pellet fuel from low-sulfur Illinois coal fines which could burn with emissions of less than 1.8 lbs SO{sub 2}/10{sup 6} Btu in stoker-fired boilers. The significance of 1.8 lbs SO{sub 2}/10{sup 6} Btu is that in the Chicago (9 counties) and St. Louis (2 counties) metropolitan areas, industrial users of coal currently must comply with this level of emissions. Stokers are an attractive market for pellets because pellets are well-suited for this application and because western coal is not a competitor in the stoker market. Compliance stoker fuels come from locations such as Kentucky and West Virginia and the price for fuels from these locations is high relative to the current price of Illinois coal. This market offers the most attractive near-term economic environment for commercialization of pelletization technology. For this effort, we will be investigating the use of fines from two Illinois mines which currently mine relatively low-sulfur reserves and that discard their fines fraction (minus 100 mesh). The research will involve investigation of multiple unit operations including column flotation, filtration and pellet production. The end result of the effort will allow for an evaluation of the commercial viability of the approach.
Date: December 31, 1995
Creator: Rapp, D.; Lytle, J.; Berger, R. & Ho, Ken
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Improved oil production using economical biopolymer-surfactant blends for profile modification and mobility control. Final report, November 1998

Description: In the past, starch hydrocolloids have not been effective alternates to partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamides, copolymers, and xanthan gum polymers as water shutoff agents in fractures and in matrix flow configurations. Poor injectivity and questionable stability have usually prevented their use in profile control applications. However, in recent years, the demands of the oil and gas drilling industry have led to the development of new drilling, drill-in, and completion fluids with improved functionality. New types of modified starches have contributed to these new drill in fluid (DIF) products. It was felt that the properties of the new products would lend themselves to applications in improved recovery. The objective of this project has been to evaluate the use of agricultural starch biopolymers for gelled and polymer applications in oil recovery processes. The authors believe that there is great potential for finding new functional starch products because of their chemical and structural flexibility, low cost, and wide availability. The goals of this project have been, therefore, to systematically investigate how the physical properties and chemical composition of relatively inexpensive agricultural starch products will influence their use as effective selective permeability control agents or as gels for water shut-off.
Date: December 1, 1998
Creator: Gabitto, J.; Barrufet, M.A. & Burnett, D.B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Starch synthesis in the maize endosperm as affected by starch-synthesizing mutants. Final technical report, June 15, 1988--December 31, 1996

Description: The goal of this project was the elucidation of the pathway of starch biosynthesis in the developing maize endosperm with mutants affecting the process constituting the experimental probes. Studies involving a total of seven different loci were undertaken, with a concentration on four of these. The four studies focus on the following: brittle endosperm1 (bt1); brittle endosperm2 (bt2); phosphoglucomutase (pgm); and sugary3 (su3).
Date: June 1, 1998
Creator: Nelson, O.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fumaric acid: an overlooked form of fixed carbon in Arabidopsis and other plant species

Description: Photoassimilates are used by plants for production of energy, as carbon skeletons and in transport of fixed carbon between different plant organs. Many studies have been devoted to characterizing the factors that. regulate photoassimilate concentrations in different plant species. Most studies examining photoassimilate concentrations in C{sub 3} plants have focused on analyzing starch and soluble sugars. However, work presented here demonstrates that a number of C{sub 3} plants, including the popular model organism Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh., and agriculturally important plants, such as soybean [Glycine ma (L.) Merr.], contain significant quantities of furnaric acid. In fact, furnaric acid can accumulate to levels of several mg per g fresh weight in A-abidopsis leaves, often exceeding starch and soluble sugar levels. Furnaric acid is a component of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and, like starch and soluble sugars, can be metabolized to yield energy and carbon skeletons for production of other compounds. Fumaric acid concentrations increase with plant age and light intensity in Arabidopsis leaves. Arabidopsis phloem exudates contain significant quantities of fumaric acid, raising the possibility that fumaric acid may function in carbon transport.
Date: October 1, 2000
Creator: Chia, D.W.; Yoder, T.J.; Reiter, W.D. & Gibson, S.I.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Combustion of char-coal waste pellets for high efficiency and low NO{sub x}. Quarterly report, 1 December 1994--28 February 28, 1995

Description: High efficiencies can be obtained from combined cycle power plants where fuel gas produced in a carbonizer is used to power the topping cycle turbines, while the residual char is burnt to raise steam for the bottoming Rankine cycle plant. Illinois coals are excellent fuels for these high efficiency power plants as the sulfur in the fuel gas is removed in the carbonization process by adding dolomite, thus producing a clean burning fuel gas. The residual char has essentially no volatiles, and is of low density. Because of these characteristics the char requires a longer residence time for efficient combustion. This research is directed towards improving the residence time of the char by pelletizing it with a waste coal, while at the same time reducing the sulfur dioxide emissions from the char combustion. During this quarter, extensive experimentation has been performed to determine the char-gob waste proportions necessary for forming pellets with desirable compression strength for feeding into the circulating fluidized bed combustor. Carbonizer char-gob coal pellets have been made with 5, 10 and 15 weight percent of cornstarch binder. Based on the test data presented, it is concluded that 10--15% weight percent of binder will be required when pelletizing char-gob coal waste mixtures containing 30-40 percent by weight of gob coal. During the next quarter, these pellets will be made in larger quantities and their combustion and emissions properties will be evaluated in a bench scale 4-inch diameter circulating fluidized bed combustor.
Date: December 31, 1995
Creator: Rajan, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Thermal Properties of Starch From New Corn Lines as Impacted by Environment and During Line Development

Description: The objectives of this research were to further characterize exotic by adapted corn inbreds by studying the impact of environment on their starch thermal properties, and investigating the development of starch thermal properties during kernel maturation by using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). A method to expedite identification of unusual starch thermal traits was investigated by examining five corn kernels at a time, instead of one kernel, which the previous screening methods used. Corn lines with known thermal functions were blended with background starch (control) in ratios of unique starch to control starch, and analyzed by using DSC. Control starch was representative of typical corn starch. The values for each ratio within a mutant type were unique ({alpha} < 0.01) for most DSC measurements. These results supported the five-kernel method for rapidly screening large amounts of corn germplasm to identify unusual starch traits. The effects of 5 growing locations on starch thermal properties from exotic by adapted corn and Corn Belt lines were studied using DSC. The warmest location, Missouri, generally produced starch with greater gelatinization onset temperature (T{sub oG}), narrower range of gelatinization (R{sub G}), and greater enthalpy of gelatinization ({Delta}H{sub G}). The coolest location, Illinois, generally resulted in starch with lower T{sub oG}, wider R{sub G}, and lower {Delta}H{sub G}. Starch from the Ames 1 farm had thermal properties similar to those of Illinois, whereas starch from the Ames 2 farm had thermal properties similar to those of Missouri. The temperature at Ames 2 may have been warmer since it was located near a river; however, soil type and quality also were different. Final corn starch structure and function change during development and maturity. Thus, the changes in starch thermal properties during 5 stages of endosperm development from exotic by adapted corn and Corn Belt lines at two locations ...
Date: December 12, 2003
Creator: Lenihan, Elizabeth M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Alternative Feedstocks Program Technical and Economic Assessment: Thermal/Chemical and Bioprocessing Components

Description: This resource document on biomass to chemicals opportunities describes the development of a technical and market rationale for incorporating renewable feedstocks into the chemical industry in both a qualitative and quantitative sense. The term "renewable feedstock?s" can be defined to include a huge number of materials such as agricultural crops rich in starch, lignocellulosic materials (biomass), or biomass material recovered from a variety of processing wastes.
Date: July 1, 1993
Creator: Bozell, J. J. & Landucci, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department