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Microstructures of laser deposited 304L austenitic stainless steel

Description: Laser deposits fabricated from two different compositions of 304L stainless steel powder were characterized to determine the nature of the solidification and solid state transformations. One of the goals of this work was to determine to what extent novel microstructure consisting of single-phase austenite could be achieved with the thermal conditions of the LENS [Laser Engineered Net Shape] process. Although ferrite-free deposits were not obtained, structures with very low ferrite content were achieved. It appeared that, with slight changes in alloy composition, this goal could be met via two different solidification and transformation mechanisms.
Date: May 22, 2000
Creator: BROOKS,JOHN A.; HEADLEY,THOMAS J. & ROBINO,CHARLES V.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Localized weld metal corrosion in stainless steel water tanks

Description: The rapidly developed leaks within the TFC and TFD tanks (LLNL groundwater treatment facilities) were caused by localized corrosion within the resolidified weld metal. The corrosion was initiated by the severe oxidation of the backsides of the welds which left the exposed surfaces in a condition highly susceptible to aqueous corrosion. The propagation of surface corrosion through the thickness of the welds occurred by localized corrosive attack. This localized attack was promoted by the presence of shielded aqueous environments provided by crevices at the root of the partial penetration welds. In addition to rapid corrosion of oxidized surfaces, calcium carbonate precipitation provided an additional source of physical shielding from the bulk tank environment. Qualification testing of alternate weld procedures showed that corrosion damage can be prevented in 304L stainless steel GTA welds by welding from both sides while preventing oxidation of the tank interior through the use of an inert backing gas such as argon. Corrosion resistance was also satisfactory in GMA welds in which oxidized surfaces were postweld cleaned by wire brushing and chemically passivated in nitric acid. Further improvements in corrosion resistance are expected from a Mo-containing grade of stainless steel such as type 316L, although test results were similar for type 304L sheet welded with type 308L filler metal and type 316L sheet welded with type 316L filler metal.
Date: May 25, 1995
Creator: Strum, M.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Preliminary cleaning tests on candidate materials for APS beamline and front end UHV components

Description: Comparative cleaning tests have been done on four candidate materials for use in APS beamline and front-end vacuum components. These materials are 304 SS, 304L SS, OFHC copper, and Glidcop* (Cu-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3})- Samples of each material were prepared and cleaned using two different methods. After cleaning, the sample surfaces were analyzed using ESCA (Electron Spectography for Chemical Analysis). Uncleaned samples were used as a reference. The cleaning methods and surface analysis results are further discussed.
Date: May 12, 1992
Creator: Nielsen, R. & Kuzay, T.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Investigation of the liquid low-level waste evaporator steam coil failure and supporting laboratory studies

Description: Using a remote video camera, the internals of a low-level waste evaporator tank (termed 2A2, type 304L stainless steel construction, known to have failed steam coils) were inspected. This inspection revealed at least three rather substantial holes as opposed to crack- or pit-like leak sites near the nominal solution level position on one particular steam coil. This section was removed from the evaporator vessel, and subsequent hot cell examination revealed extensive general corrosion on the process side of the coil with little or no attack on the steam side. Hot cell metallography confirmed intense general corrosion on the process side and, in addition, revealed shallow intergranular attack at the leading edge of corrosion. No pits or cracks were detected in this section of the steam coil. Laboratory corrosion tests with coupons of 304L (and other high-alloy materials) isothermally exposed in a range of solutions similar to those expected in the evaporator reveal only very low corrosion rates below 40% sodium hydroxide and the solution boiling point. However, {open_quotes}dried film{close_quotes} experiments revealed that much more dilute solutions became aggressive to stainless steel due to concentrating effects (evaporation and periodic wetting) at the air/solution interface. The high general corrosion rates observed on the failed coil section occurred at or near the air/solution interface and were attributed to such {open_quotes}splash zone{close_quotes} activity.
Date: May 1, 1995
Creator: Pawel, S.J.; Keiser, J.R. & Longmire, H.F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation of laser welding techniques for hydrogen transmission. Final report, September 1977-November 1979

Description: This program was established to determine the feasibility of laser beam welding as a fabrication method for hydrogen transmission and is a precursor in the effort to systematically provide the technological base necessary for large-scale, economic pipeline transmission of fuel for a hydrogen energy system. The study contributes to the technology base by establishing the effect of conventional weld processes and laser beam welding on the mechanical properties of two classes of steels in an air and high pressure gaseous hydrogen environment. Screening evaluation of the tensile, low-cycle fatigue and fracture toughness properties and metallurgical analyses provide the basis for concluding that laser beam welding of AISI 304L stainless steel and ASTM A106B carbon steel can produce weldments of comparable quality to those produced by gas-tungsten arc and electron beam welding and is at least equally compatible with 13.8 MPa (2000 psig) gaseous hydrogen environment.
Date: May 1, 1980
Creator: Mucci, J
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A technical basis to relax the dew point specification for the environment in the vapor space in DWPF canisters

Description: This memorandum establishes the technical basis to conclude that relaxing, from 0 C to 20 C, the dew point specification for the atmosphere in the vapor space (free volume) of a DWPF canister will not provide an environment that will cause significant amounts of corrosion induced degradation of the canister wall. The conclusion is based on engineering analysis, experience and review of the corrosion literature. The basic assumptions underlying the conclusion are: (1) the canister was fabricated from Type 304L stainless steel; (2) the corrosion behavior of the canister material, including base metal, fusion zones and heat effected zones, is typified by literature data for, and industrial experience with, 300 series austenitic stainless steels; and (3) the glass-metal crevices created during the pouring operation will not alter the basic corrosion resistance of the steel although such crevices might serve as sites for the initiation of minor amounts of corrosion on the canister wall.
Date: May 1, 1995
Creator: Louthan, M.R. Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Stress-corrosion-cracking studies on candidate container alloys for the Tuff Repository

Description: Cortest Columbus Technologies, Inc. (CC Technologies) investigated the long-term performance of container materials used for high-level waste package as part of the information needed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to assess the Department of Energy`s application to construct to geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste. At the direction of the NRC, the program focused on the Tuff Repository. This report summarizes the results of Stress-Corrosion-Cracking (SCC) studies performed in Tasks 3, 5, and 7 of the program. Two test techniques were used; U-bend exposures and Slow-Strain-Rate (SSR) tests. The testing was performed on two copper-base alloys (Alloy CDA 102 and Alloy CDA 175) and two Fe-Cr-Ni alloys (Alloy 304L and Alloy 825) in simulated J-13 groundwater and other simulated solutions for the Tuff Repository. These solutions were designed to simulate the effects of concentration and irradiation on the groundwater composition. All SCC testing on the Fe-Cr-Ni Alloys was performed on solution-annealed specimens and thus issues such as the effect of sensitization on SCC were not addressed.
Date: May 1, 1992
Creator: Beavers, J.A. & Durr, C.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Reactor primary coolant system pipe rupture study. Progress report No. 35, January--March 1976. [BWR]

Description: The pipe rupture study is designed to extend the understanding of failure-causing mechanisms and to provide improved capability for evaluating reactor piping systems to minimize the probability of failures. Following a detailed review to determine the effort most needed to improve nuclear system piping (Phase I), analytical and experimental efforts (Phase II) were started in 1965. This progress report summarizes the recent accomplishments of a broad program in (a) basic fatigue crack growth rate studies focused on LWR primary piping materials in a simulated BWR primary coolant environment, and (b) studies directed at quantifying weld sensitization in Type-304 stainless steel.
Date: May 1, 1976
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Reactor primary coolant system pipe rupture study. Progress report No. 39, January--March 1977. [BWR]

Description: The pipe rupture study is designed to extend the understanding of failure-causing mechanisms and to provide improved capability for evaluating reactor piping systems to minimize the probability of failures. Following a detailed review to determine the effort most needed to improve nuclear system piping, analytical and experimental efforts were started in 1965. The progress report summarizes the recent accomplishments of a broad program in (a) basic fatigue crack growth rate studies focused on LWR primary piping materials in a simulated BWR primary coolant environment, and (b) studies directed at quantifying weld sensitization in Type-304 stainless steel.
Date: May 1, 1977
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Permeation rates for RTF metal hydride vessels

Description: Contamination rates have been estimated for the RTF nitrogen heating and cooling system (NH and CS) due to tritium permeation through the walls of metal hydride vessels. Tritium contamination of the NH and CS will be seen shortly after start-up of the RTF with the majority of it coming from the TCAP units. Contamination rates of the NH and CS are estimated to exceed 400 Ci/year after three years of operation and will elevate tritium concentrations in the NH and CS above 6 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} {mu}Ci/cc. To reduce tritium activity in the NH and CS, a stripper or ``getter`` bed may need to be installed in the NH and CS. Increasing the purge rate of nitrogen from the NH and CS is shown to be an impractical method for reducing tritium activity due to the high purge rates required. Stripping of the NH and CS nitrogen in the glove box stripper system will give a temporary lowering of tritium activity in the NH and CS, but tritium activity will return to its previous level in approximately two weeks.
Date: May 21, 1992
Creator: Klein, J. E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Supplementary safety system corrosion studies

Description: This memorandum presents experimental data from electrochemical and immersion tests to support the continued use of two sections of nonconforming steel in the Supplementary Safety System. The Reactor Corrosion Mitigation Committee met on May 16, 1991 to evaluate materials that had been installed in the SSS. The materials lacked complete Corrosion Evaluation (CE) and/or Certified Mill Test Reports and had been installed during recent modifications (Project S-4332). Items that lacked proper documentation included AISI Type 304 stainless steel (304) instrument tubing (0.375`` OD) associated with the pressure transmitters and a two-foot section of 304 pipe located on the far side of the system downstream of the pneumatic valves. Cyclic potentiodynamic polarization scans were performed on sensitized and solution-annealed 304 samples in as-mixed and acidified Gd(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}, or ``ink``, solutions at room temperature to determine the susceptibility of 304 to localized corrosion in this environment. No localized attack was observed on the solution annealed or sensitized 304 in the Gd(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} solution. These tests revealed no significant differences in the behavior of the sensitized and solution-annealed 304 in gadolinium nitrate solution. Therefore, localized corrosion of the nonconforming components is not anticipated, and the performance of the nonconforming components should not differ from that of corrosion evaluated and certified materials. Previous studies have shown that AISI Type 304L stainless steel (304L) did not pit during a three-month exposure in gadolinium nitrate solutions of pH 2 or 5. These combined results support the continued use of the nonconforming steels until replacement can be made at the next scheduled long shut-down.
Date: May 21, 1991
Creator: Anderson, M. H. & Wiersma, B. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

GCFR core cladding temperature limits

Description: This paper reviews the phenomena that affect selection of the GCFR cladding faulted temperature limit. The limiting effects are determined to be clad melting, strength and oxidation rate. The selected temperature limit is 1300/sup 0/C (2370/sup 0/F). The limits for normal, upset and emergency events are also breifly reviewed, and some changes under consideration are discussed.
Date: May 1, 1980
Creator: Day, J.M. & LaBar, M.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Joining uranium to steel

Description: A method has been devised which will allow the joining of uranium to steel by fusion welding through the use of an intermediate material. Uranium-0.5 titanium was joined to AISI 304L stainless steel by using a vanadium insert. Also, a method is now available for selecting possible filler metals when two entirely dissimilar metals need to be joined. This method allows a quantitative ranking to be made of the possible filler metals and thus the most likely candidate can be selected.
Date: May 1, 1976
Creator: Perkins, M. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Effect of internal heating during hot compression testing on the stress-strain behavior and hot working characteristics of Alloy 304L

Description: Temperature change from conversion of deformation to internal heat, and its effect on stress-strain behavior of alloy 304L was investigated by initially isothermal (temperature of specimen, compression dies, environment equilibrated at initiation of test) uniaxial compression. Strain rate was varied 0.01 s{sup {minus}1} to 1 s{sup {minus}1} (thermal state of specimen varied from nearly isothermal to nearly adiabatic). Specimens were deformed at 750 to 1150 to a strain of 1. Change in temperature with strain was calculated via finite element analysis from measured stress-strain data and predictions were confirmed with thermocouples to verify the model. Temperature increased nearly linearly at the highest strain rate, consistent with temperature rise being a linear function of strain (adiabatic). As strain rate was lowered, heat transfer from superheated specimen to cooler dies caused sample temperature to increase and then decrease with strain as the sample thinned and specimen-die contact area increased. As-measured stress was corrected. Resulting isothermal flow curves were compared to predictions of a simplified method suggested by Thomas and Shrinivasan and differences are discussed. Strain rate sensitivity, activation energy for deformation, and flow curve peak associated with onset of dynamic recrystallization were determined from both as-measured and isothermal stress-strain data and found to vary widely. The impact of utilizing as-measured stress-strain data, not corrected for internal heating, on results of a number of published investigations is discussed.
Date: May 1, 1993
Creator: Mataya, M. C. & Sackschewsky, V. E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation of laser welding techniques for hydrogen transmission. Progress report, April 1, 1978--April 30, 1978

Description: Machining of the A106B GTA and EB welded specimens was completed. Laser welding of the AISI 304L and ASTM A106B materials is continuing. Tensile testing of the ASTM A106B EB welded specimens was initiated and completed. Testing of the ASTM A106B EB welded material indicated generally lower ductility than the parent material. Low-cycle fatigue testing of the ASTM A106B material in 13.8 MPa hydrogen indicates reductions in mean life of approximately 50 and 27% due to the GTA and EB welding respectively. (LK)
Date: May 19, 1978
Creator: Mucci, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Applications of simultaneous ion backscattering and ion-induced x-ray emission

Description: Simultaneous ion backscattering and ion-induced x-ray emission (E/sub x/greater than or equal to 300 eV) analyses have been performed using helium ions as probes of the first few hundred nanometers of various materials. These studies serve as a demonstration of the complementary nature of the two types of information obtained. Uncertainties associated with each of the individual techniques were reduced by performing both analyses. The principal advantages of simultaneous analyses over sequential analyses have been delineated.
Date: May 1, 1983
Creator: Musket, R.G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department