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A QUICK KEY TO THE SUBFAMILIES AND GENERA OF ANTS OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE, AIKEN, SC

Description: This taxonomic key was devised to support development of a Rapid Bioassessment Protocol using ants at the Savannah River Site. The emphasis is on ''rapid'' and, because the available keys contained a large number of genera not known to occur at the Savannah River Site, we found that the available keys were unwieldy. Because these keys contained more genera than we would likely encounter and because this larger number of genera required both more couplets in the key and often required examination of characters that are difficult to assess without higher magnifications (60X or higher) more time was required to process samples. In developing this set of keys I recognize that the character sets used may lead to some errors but I believe that the error rate will be small and, for the purpose of rapid bioassessment, this error rate will be acceptable provided that overall sample sizes are adequate. Oliver and Beattie (1996a, 1996b) found that for rapid assessment of biodiversity the same results were found when identifications were done to morphospecies by people with minimal expertise as when the same data sets were identified by subject matter experts. Basset et al. (2004) concluded that it was not as important to correctly identify all species as it was to be sure that the study included as many functional groups as possible. If your study requires high levels of accuracy, it is highly recommended that when you key out a specimen and have any doubts concerning the identification, you should refer to keys in Bolton (1994) or to the other keys used to develop this area specific taxonomic key.
Date: October 4, 2006
Creator: Martin, D
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Microbially Induced Iron Oxidation: What, Where, How

Description: From the results of the different bacterial cells seen, it is fairly certain that Gallionella is present because of the bean-shaped cells and twisted stalks found with the TEM. The authors cannot confirm, though, what other iron-oxidizing genera exist in the tubes, since the media was only preferential and not one that isolated a specific genus of bacteria. Based on the environment in which they live and the source of the water, they believe their cultures contain Gallionella, Leptothrix, and possibly Crenothrix and Sphaerotilus. They believe the genus Leptothrix rather than Sphaerotilus exist in the tubes because the water source was fresh, unlike the polluted water in which Sphaerotilus are usually found. The TEM preparations worked well. The cryogenic method rapidly froze the cells in place and allowed them to view their morphology. The FAA method, as stated previously, was the best of the three methods because it gave the best contrast. The gluteraldehyde samples did not come out as well. It is possible that the gluteraldehyde the authors prepared was still too concentrated and did not mix well. Although these bacteria were collected from springs and then cultured in an environment containing a presumably pure iron-bearing metal, it seems the tube already containing Manganese Gradient Medium could be used with a piece of metal containing these bacteria. A small piece of corroding metal could then be inserted into the test tube and cultured to study the bacteria.
Date: August 15, 2000
Creator: SCHIERMEYER,ELISA M.; PROVENCIO,PAULA P. & NORTHUP,DIANA E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Plant communities as bioclimate indicators on Isla Navarino, one of the southernmost forested areas of the world

Description: This article focuses on Isla Navarino (Chile) to understand changes in plant community composition and plant diversity and their relation to climatic factors along an altitudinal gradient.
Date: September 29, 2016
Creator: Molina, José Antonio; Lumbreras, Ana; Benavent-González, Albert; Rozzi, Ricardo & Sancho, Leopoldo G.
Partner: UNT College of Arts and Sciences

A QUICK KEY TO THE SUBFAMILIES AND GENERA OF ANTS OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

Description: This taxonomic key was devised to support development of a Rapid Bioassessment Protocol using ants at the Savannah River Site. The emphasis is on 'rapid' and, because the available keys contained a very large number of genera not known to occur at the Savannah River Site, we found that the available keys were unwieldy. Because these keys contained many more genera than we would ever encounter and because this larger number of genera required more couplets in the key and often required examination of characters that are difficult to assess without higher magnifications (60X or higher), more time was required to process samples. In developing this set of keys I emphasized character states that are easier for nonspecialists to recognize. I recognize that the character sets used may lead to some errors but I believe that the error rate will be small and, for the purpose of rapid bioassessment, this error rate will be acceptable provided that overall sample sizes are adequate. Oliver and Beattie (1996a, 1996b) found that for rapid assessment of biodiversity the same results were found when identifications were done to morphospecies by people with minimal expertise as when the same data sets were identified by subject matter experts. Basset et al. (2004) concluded that it was not as important to correctly identify all species as it was to be sure that the study included as many functional groups as possible. If your study requires high levels of accuracy, it is highly recommended that, when you key out a specimen and have any doubts concerning the identification, you should refer to keys in Bolton (1994) or to the other keys used to develop this area specific taxonomic key.
Date: September 4, 2007
Creator: Martin, D
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Partial Support for U.S. Participants in the International Marine Biotechnology Conference 2005, in Newfoundland, Canada, June 7-12, 2005

Description: This proposal requests inter-agency support for U.S. scientists to attend the IMBC2005. This meeting is the premier international Marine Biotechnology meeting and emphasizes the use of molecular approaches in studying the protection and enhancement of global marine resources. The scientific programs of IMBC2005 include Marine Microbiology, Genomics and Proteomics, Extremophiles, Bioremediation, Cell and Molecular Biology, Bioactives, Transgenics, Aquaculture, Seafood Safety, and Biodiversity. For more information, please refer to http://www.imbc2005.org/welcome_e.html. The objectives of this proposal are to: 1. Facilitate attendance by a broad range of U.S. scientists, technologists, and students at the MBC2005 2. Ensure that U.S. scientists are exposed to the latest global advances in Marine Biotechnology 3. Encourage collaboration between U.S. and other scientists in the important and rapidly developing field of Marine Biotechnology.
Date: September 30, 2006
Creator: Chen, Feng
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Microbial Population Changes During Bioremediation of an Experimental Oil Spill

Description: A field experiment was conducted in Delaware (USA) to evaluate three crude oil bioremediation techniques. Four treatments were studied: no oil control, oil alone, oil + nutrients, and oil + nutrients + an indigenous inoculum. The microbial populations were monitored by standard MPN techniques, PLFA profile analysis, and 16S rDNA DGGE analysis for species definition. Viable MPN estimates showed high but steadily declining microbial numbers and no significant differences among treatments during the 14-weeks. Regarding the PLFA results, the communities shifted over the 14-week period from being composed primarily of eukaryotes to Gram-negative bacteria. The Gram-negative communities shifted from the exponential to the stationary phase of growth after week 0. All Gram-negative communities showed evidence of environmental stress. The 16S rDNA DGGE profile of all plots revealed eight prominent bands at time zero. The untreated control plots revealed a simple, dynamic dominant population structure throughout the experiment. The original banding pattern disappeared rapidly in all oiled plots, indicating that the dominant species diversity changed and increased substantially over 14 weeks. The nature of this change was altered by nutrient-addition and the addition of the indigenous inoculum.
Date: August 8, 1998
Creator: Chang, Y. J.; Davis, G. A.; Macnaughton, S. J.; Stephen, J. R.; Venosa, A. D. & White, D. C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Landscape characterization and biodiversity research

Description: Rapid deforestation often produces landscape-level changes in forest characteristics and structure, including area, distribution, and forest habitat types. Changes in landscape pattern through fragmentation or aggregation of natural habitats can alter patterns of abundance for single species and entire communities. Examples of single-species effects include increased predation along the forest edge, the decline in the number of species with poor dispersal mechanisms, and the spread of exotic species that have deleterious effects (e.g., gypsy moth). A decrease in the size and number of natural habitat patches increases the probability of local extirpation and loss of diversity of native species, whereas a decline in connectivity between habitat patches can negatively affect species persistence. Thus, there is empirical justification for managing entire landscapes, not just individual habitat types, in order to insure that native plant and animal diversity is maintained. A landscape is defined as an area composed of a mosaic of interacting ecosystems, or patches, with the heterogeneity among the patches significantly affecting biotic and abiotic processes in the landscape. Patches comprising a landscape are usually composed of discrete areas of relatively homogeneous environmental conditions and must be defined in terms of the organisms of interest. A large body of theoretical work in landscape ecology has provided a wealth of methods for quantifying spatial characteristics of landscapes. Recent advances in remote sensing and geographic information systems allow these methods to be applied over large areas. The objectives of this paper are to present a brief overview of common measures of landscape characteristics, to explore the new technology available for their calculation, to provide examples of their application, and to call attention to the need for collection of spatially-explicit field data.
Date: March 1, 1995
Creator: Dale, V.H.; Offerman, H.; Frohn, R. & Gardner, R.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Changes in bird community composition in response to growth changes in short-rotation woody crop plantings

Description: Hybrid poplar established as intensively managed short-rotation woody crops (SRWC) former agricultural lands can provide habitat for wildlife. Studies of bird use of SRWC for nesting and during fall migration have shown that the numbers and kinds of breeding birds using mature plantings of hybrid poplar are similar to natural-forested lands. In Minnesota, the number and species of breeding birds using habitat provided by clonal-trial plantings and young larger-scale plantings (12--64 ha) of hybrid poplar were initially most similar to those using grasslands and row-crops. As the plantings approached canopy closure, successional species became predominant. In the Pacific Northwest, breeding bird composition and density were very similar for mature plantings and forested areas; however, fall migrants were found primarily in forested areas. In the Southeast, preliminary comparisons of breeding bird use of plantings of sweetgum and sycamore with naturally regenerating forests of different ages and sizes and vegetation structure are showing no size effect on use. As with hybrid poplar, species use of the more mature plantings of sweetgum and sycamore was most similar to that of natural forests.
Date: October 1997
Creator: Tolbert, V. R.; Hanowski, J.; Christian, D.; Hoffman, W.; Schiller, A. & LIndberg, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Approximation algorithms for the fixed-topology phylogenetic number problem

Description: In the {ell}-phylogeny problem, one wishes to construct an evolutionary tree for a set of species represented by characters, in which each state of each character induces no more than {ell} connected components. The authors consider the fixed-topology version of this problem for fixed-topologies of arbitrary degree. This version of the problem is known to be NP-complete for {ell} {ge} 3 even for degree-3 trees in which no state labels more than {ell} + 1 leaves (and therefore there is a trivial {ell} + 1 phylogeny). They give a 2-approximation algorithm for all {ell} {ge} 3 for arbitrary input topologies and they given an optimal approximation algorithm that constructs a 4-phylogeny when a 3-phylogeny exists. Dynamic programming techniques, which are typically used in fixed-topology problems, cannot be applied to {ell}-phylogeny problems. The 2-approximation algorithm is the first application of linear programming to approximation algorithms for phylogeny problems. They extend their results to a related problem in which characters are polymorphic.
Date: April 1, 1997
Creator: Cryan, M.; Goldberg, L.A. & Phillips, C.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Proper statistical treatment of species-area data

Description: The purpose of this report is to comment on the entire process of analyzing species-area data, particularly as performed by Rydin and Borgegaard (1988). They use three different models to test species-area relations for islands over a 100 year period. Several aspects of their analysis of species-area data could be improved, including their comparison of goodness-of-fit and testing of the expected value of z. The reason that these issues are important (their basic conclusions being correct) is that there is acrimonious debate over the best model to use for species-area curves and over whether the scope coefficient is constant or is an artifact, and because the species-area curve is being used for nature reserve design. The problems pointed out here are common to a large class of allometric-type analyses in ecology. The author attempts to show the potential pitfalls inherent in allometric analyses and demonstrate methods for avoiding these problems.
Date: Spring 1988
Creator: Loehle, C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Vascular Plants of the Hanford Site

Description: This report provides an updated listing of the vascular plants present on and near the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site. This document is an update of a listing of plants prepared by Sackschewdky et al. in 1992. Since that time there has been a significant increase in the botanical knowledge of the Hanford Site. The present listing is based on an examination of herbarium collections held at PNNL, at WSU-Tri Cities, WSU-Pullman, Brigham Young University, and The University of Washington, and on examination of ecological literature derived from the Hanford and Benton county areas over the last 100 years. Based on the most recent analysis, there are approximately 725 different plant species that have been documented on or around the Hanford Site. This represents an approximate 20% increase in the number of species reported within Sackschewsky et al. (1992). This listing directly supports DOE and contractor efforts to assess the potential impacts of Hanford Site operations.
Date: September 28, 2001
Creator: Sackschewsky, Michael R & Downs, Janelle L
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Natural succession impeded by smooth brome (Bromus inermis) and intermediate wheatgrass (Agropyron intermedium) in an abandoned agricultural field

Description: In 1975, an abandoned agricultural field at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Site) that had been cultivated for more than 38 years, was seeded with smooth brome (Bromus inermis) and intermediate wheatgrass (Agropyron intermedium). Although these species are commonly planted in reclamation and roadside seed mixtures, few studies have documented their impact on the re-establishment of native plant communities. In 1994, species richness, cover, and biomass were sampled in the agricultural field and compared to the surrounding mixed-grass prairie at the Site. The agricultural field contained only 61 plant species (62% native), compared to 143 species (81% native) in the surrounding mixed-grass prairie. Community similarity based on species presence/absence was 0.47 (Sorensen coefficient of similarity). Basal vegetative cover was 11.2% in the agricultural field and 29.1% in the mixed-grass prairie. Smooth brome and intermediate wheatgrass accounted for 93% of the relative foliar cover and 96% of the biomass in the agricultural field. The aggressive nature of these two planted species has impeded the natural succession of the agricultural field to a more native prairie community. Studies of natural succession on abandoned fields and roads in northeastern Colorado have indicated that if left alone, fields would return to their native climax state in approximately 50 years and would be approaching their native state after 20--25 years. Based on the results of this study, this agricultural field may take more than 100 years to return to a native mixed-grass prairie state and it may never achieve a native state without human intervention.
Date: November 1, 1997
Creator: Nelson, J.K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A comprehensive landscape approach for monitoring bats on the Nevada Test Site in south-central Nevada

Description: The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is located in south-central Nevada and encompasses approximately 3,497 square kilometers (1,350 square miles). It straddles both the Mojave and Great Basin Deserts and includes a distinct transition region between these two deserts. Because of its geographical location, a great level of vegetative and physiographic diversity exists on the NTS. Also, numerous mines and tunnels are found on the NTS which are potential roost sites for bats. Multiple technqiues are being used to inventory and monitor the bat fauna on the NTS. These techniques include mistnetting at water sources with concurrent use of the Anabat II bat detection system, conducting road surveys with the Anabat II system, and conducting exit surveys at mine and tunnel entrances using the Anabat II system. To date, a total of 13 species of bats has been documented on the NTS, of which six are considered species of concern by the US Fish and Wildlife Service. These include Townsend's big-eared bat (Corynorhinus townsendii), spotted bat (Euderma maculatum), small-footed myotis (Myotis ciliolabrum), long-eared myotis (M. evotis), fringed myotis (M. thysanodes), and long-legged myotis (M. volans). Results from mistnet and Anabat surveys reveal that all bat species of concern except for the long-legged myotis are found exclusively in the Great Basin Desert portion of the NTS. The long-legged myotis is found throughout the NTS. The Anabat II system has greatly facilitated the monitoring of bats on the NTS, and allowed biologists to cost effectively survey large areas for bat activity. Information obtained from bat monitoring will be used to develop and update guidelines for managing bats on the NTS.
Date: January 1, 2000
Creator: Hall, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Third international symposium: Cytochrome P450 biodiversity. Final report, January 1, 1995--December 31, 1995

Description: The Symposium was held on October 8-12, 1995 at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole Massachusetts. Other international symposia promote cytochrome P450 research but have a primary focus on mammalian systems. This symposium is exclusively devoted to research in other organisms, and major topics reflect the distribution and dominance of non-mammalian species in the biosphere. The five sessions focused on basic mechanism, regulation, biodiversity, host-parasite interactions, and practical applications. 170 Scientists contributed 38 oral presentations and 91 posters, with a truly international composition of the symposium. Practical applications were a recurring feature, linking reports on mechanism and regulation to studies on the engineering of substrate specificity, microorganisms to degrade halogenated hydrocarbons and herbicides, and the production of in vitro P450 electrochemical bioreactors. At the time of the symposium there were 477 cytochrome P450 sequences in the database. Expansion of the known plant P450 genes was reported, with 20 new plant P450 families added in the last 3 years. Of these only 5 families have a physiological function associated with them. A growing number of identified invertebrate P450s was documented, where in insects, the forms identified are primarily involved in inducible xenobiotic metabolism and detoxification of toxic plant substances.
Date: March 1, 1997
Creator: Loper, J.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The winds of (evolutionary) change: Breathing new life into microbiology

Description: To date, over 1500 prokaryotes have been characterized by small subunit rRNA sequencing and molecular phylogeny has had an equally profound effect on our understanding of relationship among eukaryotic microorganisms. The universal phylogenetic tree readily shows however how artificial the strong distinction between the eukaryote and prokaryotes has become. The split between the Archaea and the Bacteria is now recognized as the primary phylogenetic division and that the Eucarya have branched from the same side of the tree as the Archaea. Both prokaryotic domains would seem to be of thermophilic origin suggesting that life arose in a very warm environment. Among the Archaea, all of the Crenarchaeota cultured to date are thermophiles, and the deepest euryarchaeal branchings are represented exclusively by thermophiles. Among the Bacteria, the deepest known branchings are again represented exclusively by thermophiles, and thermophilia is widely scattered throughout the domain. The Archaea comprise a small number of quite disparate phenotypes that grow in unusual niches. All are obligate or facultative anaerobes. All cultured crenarchaeotes are thermophilic, some even growing optimally above the normal boiling temperature of water. The Archaeoglobales are sulfate reducers growing at high temperatures. The extreme halophiles grow only in highly saline environments. The methanogens are confined to a variety of anaerobic niches, often thermophilic. The Bacteria, on the other hand, are notable as being the source of life`s photosynthetic capacity. Five kingdoms of bacteria contain photosynthetic species; and each of the five manifests a distinct type of (chlorophyll-based) photosynthesis.
Date: March 1, 1996
Creator: Olsen, G.J.; Woese, C.R. & Overbeek, R.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Habitat destruction and the extinction debt revisited

Description: A very important analysis of the problem of habitat destruction concluded that such destruction may lead to an extinction debt, which is the irreversible loss of species following a prolonged transient or delay. An error in interpretation of this model led the authors to apply the results to all types of habitat destruction, but in fact the model applies only to an across-the-board decrease in fecundity, not to disturbances. For repeated, spatially random disturbance, a different model applies. For habitat destruction on regional scales (reduction in ecosystem area without disturbance in remnant areas), one must, in contrast, apply species-area relations based on the distribution of different habitat types (e.g., elevational and rainfall gradients, physiographic and edaphic variability). The error in interpretation of the basic model is presented, followed by clarification of model usage and development of a new model that applies to disturbance events.
Date: February 1, 1996
Creator: Loehle, C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Identification of subsurface microorganisms at Yucca Mountain. Quarterly report, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995

Description: More than 1100 bacterial isolates were obtained over a two year period from 31 springs in a region along the southern boarder of California and Nevada. Water samples were collected from 17 springs in Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge and 14 springs in Death Valley National Park. Bacteria isolated from these samples were subjected to extraction and gas chromatography to determine the cellular fatty acid profile of each isolate. Fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) extracted from cell membranes were separated and classified using the Hewlett Packard by gas chromatography. The FAME profiles of each isolate were then subjected to cluster analysis by the unweighted pair-group method using arithmetic averages. During this quarter the relatedness of FAME patterns of bacterial isolates were examined at the genus level by counting the number of clusters produced in a MIDI dendrogram at a Euclidian distance of 25. This information was then used to determine microbiological relationships among springs.
Date: December 1, 1995
Creator: Stetzenbach, L.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterization of the mammalian DNA polymerase gene(s) and enzyme(s). Annual progress report

Description: Two Genes for DNA polymerase delta were identified from the wild type Chinese hamster ovary cells. These genes were cloned via RT-PCR from mRNA prepared the Chinese hamster ovary cells using primers specific to conserved sequences of the DNA polymerase {delta} gene. The first gene encodes a PCNA dependent DNA polymerase {delta} gene whereas the second gene encodes a PCNA independent DNA polymerase {delta} gene. Methods were developed to clone these genes in expression vector and host systems. The role of the two genes in DNA replication and repair was determined.
Date: January 1, 1995
Creator: Mishra, N.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Secondary succession: Composition of the vegetation and primary production in the field-to-forest at Brookhaven, Long Island, N.Y.

Description: Natural communities respond to disruption through a series of changes in plant and animal communities that are broadly predictable. The field-to-forest sere of central Long Island follows the pattern set forth earlier for the Piedmont of North Carolina and for New Jersey. The communities of herbs that occur in the years immediately after abandonment are followed by an Andropogon stage which is replaced before the 20th year by pine forest. The pine is replaced in the next 25 years by oak-pine, which in the normal Course is followed by oak-hickory. With repeated burning the oak-pine stage in various combinations of oaks and pine may be maintained indefinitely. Diversity, measured as number of species per unit land area, increased in this sere through the 3-5th years after abandonment to a maximum, dropped, and rose again in the later forest stages. Exotics were a conspicuous part of the communities of the earlier stages but their importance diminished as succession progressed and their contribution to net production was zero beyond the 20th year. The removal of exotics would probably not have changed the pattern of diversity appreciably. Net primary production increased with succession in this sere with major changes occurring as life-forms of the dominants shifted to woody plants. The peak net production was in the most mature forest, about 1200 g/m{sup 2}/yr. Root/shoot ratios declined from 4-5 in the early stages of succession to 0.3-0.5 with later stages. The standing crop of organic matter including humus throughout the sere was about 15 times the net production, indicating a halftime of residence for all organic matter throughout the sere of about 10 years.
Date: August 23, 1973
Creator: Woodwell,G.M.; Holt, B. R. & Flaccus, E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Conference-EC-US Task Force Joint US-EU Workshop on Metabolomics and Environmental Biotechnology

Description: Since 1990, the EC-US Task Force on Biotechnology Research has been coordinating transatlantic efforts to guide and exploit the ongoing revolution in biotechnology and the life sciences. The Task Force was established in June 1990 by the European Commission and the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. The Task Force has acted as an effective forum for discussion, coordination, and development of new ideas for the last 18 years. Task Force members are European Commission and US Government science and technology administrators who meet annually to enhance communication across the Atlantic, and to encourage collaborative research. Through sponsoring workshops, and other activities, the Task Force also brings together scientific leaders and early career researchers from both sides of the Atlantic to forecast research challenges and opportunities and to promote better links between researchers. Over the years, by keeping a focus on the future of science, the Task Force has played a key role in establishing a diverse range of emerging scientific fields, including biodiversity research, neuroinformatics, genomics, nanobiotechnology, neonatal immunology, transkingdom molecular biology, biologically-based fuels, and environmental biotechnology. The EC-US Task Force has sponsored a number of Working Groups on topics of mutual transatlantic interest. The idea to create a Working Group on Environmental Biotechnology research was discussed in the Task Force meeting of October 1993. The EC-US Working Group on Environmental Biotechnology set as its mission 'To train the next generation of leaders in environmental biotechnology in the United States and the European Union to work collaboratively across the Atlantic.' Since 1995, the Working Group supported three kinds of activities, all of which focus one early career scientists: (1) Workshops on the use of molecular methods and genomics in environmental biotechnology; (2) Short courses with theoretical, laboratory and field elements; and (3) Short term exchange fellowships. The ...
Date: June 4, 2009
Creator: Young, PI: Lily Y. & Zylstra, Co-PI: Gerben J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department