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Review of potential processing techniques for the encapsulation of wastes in thermoplastic polymers

Description: Thermoplastic encapsulation has been extensively studied at Brookhaven National Laboratory`s (BNL) Environmental and Waste Technology Center (EWTC) as a waste encapsulation technology applicable to a wide range of waste types including radioactive, hazardous and mixed wastes. Encapsulation involves processing thermoplastic and waste materials into a waste form product by heating and mixing both materials into a homogeneous molten mixture. Cooling of the melt results in a solid monolithic waste form in which contaminants have been completely surrounded by a polymer matrix. Heating and mixing requirements for successful waste encapsulation can be met using proven technologies available in various types of commercial equipment. Processing techniques for thermoplastic materials, such as low density polyethylene (LDPE), are well established within the plastics industry. The majority of commercial polymer processing is accomplished using extruders, mixers or a combination of these technologies. Extruders and mixers are available in a broad range of designs and are used during the manufacture of consumer and commercial products as well as for compounding applications. Compounding which refers to mixing additives such as stabilizers and/or colorants with polymers, is analogous to thermoplastic encapsulation. Several processing technologies were investigated for their potential application in encapsulating residual sorbent waste in selected thermoplastic polymers, including single-screw extruders, twin-screw extruders, continuous mixers, batch mixers as well as other less conventional devices. Each was evaluated based on operational ease, quality control, waste handling capabilities as well as degree of waste pretreatment required. Based on literature review, this report provides a description of polymer processing technologies, a discussion of the merits and limitations of each and an evaluation of their applicability to the encapsulation of sorbent wastes.
Date: August 1, 1995
Creator: Patel, B.R.; Lageraaen, P.R. & Kalb, P.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Enhancing the Use of Coals by Gas Reburning - Sorbent Injection Volume 5 - Guideline Manual

Description: The purpose of the Guideline Manual is to provide recommendations for the application of combined gas reburning-sorbent injection (GR-SI) technologies to pre-NSPS boilers. The manual includes design recommendations, performance predictions, economic projections and comparisons with competing technologies. The report also includes an assessment of boiler impacts. Two full-scale demonstrations of gas reburning-sorbent injection form the basis of the Guideline Manual. Under the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Coal Technology Program (Round 1), a project was completed to demonstrate control of boiler emissions that comprise acid rain precursors, specifically oxides of nitrogen (NOX) and sulfur dioxide (S02). Other project sponsors were the Gas Research Institute and the Illinois State Department of Commerce and Community Affairs. The project involved d,emonstrating the combined use of Gas Reburning and Sorbent Injection (GR-SI) to assess the air emissions reduction potential of these technologies.. Three potential coal-fired utility boiler host sites were evaluated: Illinois Power's tangentially-fired 71 MWe (net) Hennepin Unit #1, City Water Light and Power's cyclone- fired 33 MWe (gross) Lakeside Unit #7, and Central Illinois Light Company's wall-fired 117 MWe (net) Edwards Unit #1. Commercial demonstrations were completed on the Hennepin and Lakeside Units. The Edwards Unit was removed from consideration for a site demonstration due to retrofit cost considerations. Gas Reburning (GR) controls air emissions of NOX. Natural gas is introduced into the furnace hot flue gas creating a reducing reburning zone to convert NOX to diatomic nitrogen (N,). Overfire air is injected into the furnace above the reburning zone to complete the combustion of the reducing (fuel) gases created in the reburning zone. Sorbent Injection (S1) consists of the injection of dry, calcium-based sorbents into furnace hot flue gas to achieve S02 capture. `At each site where the technologies were to be demonstrated, performance goals were set to achieve air emission ...
Date: June 1, 1998
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

LIFAC demonstration at Richmond Power and Light Whitewater Valley Unit No. 2. Final report, Volume 1 - public design

Description: This report discusses the demonstration of LIFAC sorbent injection technology at Richmond Power and Light`s (RP&L) Whitewater Valley Unit No. 2 under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Program. LIFAC is a sorbent injection technology capable of removing 75 to 85 percent of a power plant`s SO{sub 2} emissions using limestone at calcium to sulfur molar ratios of between 2 and 2.5. The site of the demonstration is a coal-fired electric utility power plant located in Richmond, Indiana. The project is being conducted by LIFAC North American (LIFAC NA), a joint venture partnership of Tampella Power Corporation and ICF Kaiser Engineers, in cooperation with DOE, RP&L, and several other organizations including the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the State of Indiana, and Black Beauty Coal Company. The purpose of Final Report Volume 1: Public Design is to consolidate, for public use, all design and cost information regarding the LIFAC Desulfurization Facility at the completion of construction and startup.
Date: February 1, 1998
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Advanced coal-fueled gas turbine systems; Technical progress report, July--September 1989

Description: During this quarter, the initial round of iron-oxide based sorbent tests were completed, with iron-oxide based sorbents showing a small advantage over the calcia-based sorbents that had been evaluated previously. Also, the evaluation of coal-water mixture (CWM), was initiated, and a bench-scale series of experiments conducted. These latter experiments concerned spent sorbent stability in molten slag.
Date: November 29, 1989
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Sorption Mechanisms for Mercury Capture in Warm Post-Gasification Gas Clean-Up Systems

Description: The research was directed towards a sorbent injection/particle removal process where a sorbent may be injected upstream of the warm gas cleanup system to scavenge Hg and other trace metals, and removed (with the metals) within the warm gas cleanup process. The specific objectives of this project were to understand and quantify, through fundamentally based models, mechanisms of interaction between mercury vapor compounds and novel paper waste derived (kaolinite + calcium based) sorbents (currently marketed under the trade name MinPlus). The portion of the research described first is the experimental portion, in which sorbent effectiveness to scavenge metallic mercury (Hg{sup 0}) at high temperatures (>600 C) is determined as a function of temperature, sorbent loading, gas composition, and other important parameters. Levels of Hg{sup 0} investigated were in an industrially relevant range ({approx} 25 {micro}g/m{sup 3}) although contaminants were contained in synthetic gases and not in actual flue gases. A later section of this report contains the results of the complementary computational results.
Date: September 30, 2008
Creator: Wendt, Jost; Lee, Sung Jun & Blowers, Paul
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

SULFURIC ACID REMOVAL PROCESS EVALUATION: SHORT-TERM RESULTS

Description: The objective of this project is to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. Sulfuric acid controls are becoming of increasing interest to utilities with coal-fired units for a number of reasons. Sulfuric acid is a Toxic Release Inventory species, a precursor to acid aerosol/condensable emissions, and can cause a variety of plant operation problems such as air heater plugging and fouling, back-end corrosion, and plume opacity. These issues will likely be exacerbated with the retrofit of SCR for NO{sub x} control on some coal-fired plants, as SCR catalysts are known to further oxidize a portion of the flue gas SO{sub 2} to SO{sub 3}. The project is testing the effectiveness of furnace injection of four different calcium- and/or magnesium-based alkaline sorbents on full-scale utility boilers. These reagents have been tested during four one- to two-week tests conducted on two First Energy Bruce Mansfield Plant units. One of the sorbents tested was a magnesium hydroxide slurry produced from a wet flue gas desulfurization system waste stream, from a system that employs a Thiosorbic{reg_sign} Lime scrubbing process. The other three sorbents are available commercially and include dolomite, pressure-hydrated dolomitic lime, and commercial magnesium hydroxide. The dolomite reagent was injected as a dry powder through out-of-service burners, while the other three reagents were injected as slurries through air-atomizing nozzles into the front wall of upper furnace, either across from the nose of the furnace or across from the pendant superheater tubes. After completing the four one- to two-week tests, the most promising sorbents were selected for longer-term (approximately 25-day) full-scale tests. The longer-term tests are being conducted to confirm the effectiveness of the sorbents tested over extended operation and to determine balance-of-plant impacts. This reports presents the results ...
Date: February 4, 2002
Creator: Blythe, Gary M. & McMillan, Richard
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

MERCURY CONTROL WITH CALCIUM-BASED SORBENTS AND OXIDIZING AGENTS

Description: The initial tasks of this DOE funded project to investigate mercury removal by calcium-based sorbents have been completed, and initial testing results have been obtained. Mercury monitoring capabilities have been obtained and validated. An approximately 1MW (3.4 Mbtu/hr) Combustion Research Facility at Southern Research Institute was used to perform pilot-scale investigations of mercury sorbents, under conditions representative of full-scale boilers. The initial results of ARCADIS G&M proprietary sorbents, showed ineffective removal of either elemental or oxidized mercury. Benchscale tests are currently underway to ascertain the importance of differences between benchscale and pilot-scale experiments. An investigation of mercury-capture temperature dependence using common sorbents has also begun. Ordinary hydrated lime removed 80 to 90% of the mercury from the flue gas, regardless of the temperature of injection. High temperature injection of hydrated lime simultaneously captured SO{sub 2} at high temperatures and Hg at low temperatures, without any deleterious effects on mercury speciation. Future work will explore alternative methods of oxidizing elemental mercury.
Date: June 1, 2002
Creator: Gale, Thomas K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

FURNACE INJECTION OF ALKALINE SORBENTS FOR SULFURIC ACID CONTROL

Description: This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-99FT40718, Furnace Injection of Alkaline Sorbents for Sulfuric Acid Control, during the time period April 1, 2001 through September 30, 2001. The objective of this project is to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. The coincident removal of hydrochloric acid and hydrofluoric acid is also being determined, as is the removal of arsenic, a known poison for NO{sub x} selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts. EPRI, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), FirstEnergy Corporation, and the Dravo Lime Company are project co-funders. URS Corporation is the prime contractor. During the current period, American Electric Power (AEP) joined the project as an additional co-funder and as a provider of a host site for testing. This is the fourth reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, two long-term sorbent injection tests were conducted, one on Unit 3 at FirstEnergy's Bruce Mansfield Plant (BMP) and one on Unit 1 at AEP's Gavin Station. These tests determined the effectiveness of injecting alkaline slurries into the upper furnace of the boiler as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions from these units. The alkaline slurries tested included commercially available magnesium hydroxide slurry (Gavin Station), and a byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry (both Gavin Station and BMP). The tests showed that injecting either the commercial or the byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry could achieve up to 70 to 75% sulfuric acid removal. At BMP, the overall removal was limited by the need to maintain acceptable electrostatic precipitator (ESP) particulate control performance. At Gavin Station, the overall sulfuric acid removal was limited because the furnace injected sorbent was less effective at removing SO{sub 3} formed across the SCR system installed on the unit for NO{sub x} ...
Date: November 6, 2001
Creator: Blythe, Gary M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Task 3.12 -- Small power systems. Semi-annual report, January 1--June 30, 1995

Description: The programmatic goal in advanced power systems will be to develop small power systems in the range of 20kW to 20 MW in cooperation with commercial vendors. These systems will be designed to incorporate the advanced technical capabilities of the EERC with the latest advancement in vendor-offered hardware and software. Work during this program year has focused on two main technical issues. Pressurized fluid-bed combustion has been identified as one technology applicable to the small user`s market. Work is focused on the development of sorbents for in-bed alkali, sulfur, and chlorine capture to reduce or eliminate problems on backend equipment. Tar production in the gasification of coal is deleterious to the operation of downstream equipment, including fuel cells, gas turbines, hot-gas filters, and pressure swing adsorption systems, all of which are candidate technologies for use in small power generation systems. Cracking of these tars into smaller hydrocarbons is the second technical issue addressed in this year`s advanced power systems task. In addition to working to solve these technically related problems, existing and developing power systems are being surveyed and a technology option(s) chosen as the focus of further development. The specific objectives of the three tasks are the following: to determine optimum sorbents and their range of effectiveness as in-bed sorbents for alkali, sulfur, and chlorine control during pressurized fluid-bed combustion; to determine the effective operating range of selected sorbents for cracking tars from gasification systems, measure the quality of the resultant gas, and determine the best advanced power systems to utilize this gas; to collected information from vendors, evaluate alternative design concepts, and select a practical and economic design for targeted development in upcoming years.
Date: August 1, 1997
Creator: Mann, M.D. & Hauserman, W.B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

INVESTIGATION AND DEMONSTRATION OF DRY CARBON-BASED SORBENT INJECTION FOR MERCURY CONTROL

Description: This quarterly report describes the activities that have taken place during the first full quarter of the Phase II project ''Investigation and Demonstration of Dry Carbon-Based Sorbent Injection for Mercury Control''. Modifications were completed and sampling began at the 600 acfm pilot-scale particulate control module (PCM) located at the Comanche Station in Pueblo, CO. The PCM was configured as an electrostatic precipitator for these tests. A Perkin-Elmer flue gas mercury analyzer was installed on-site and operated. Initial test results using both manual sampling methodology and the mercury analyzer are presented herein. Preparations were made during this period for full-scale mercury testing of several PSCo units. A site visit was made to Arapahoe and Cherokee Generating Stations to determine sample locations and to develop a test plan.
Date: October 1, 1998
Creator: Hunt, Terry; Fox, Mark; Stan, Lillian; Haythornthwaite, Sheila; Smith, Justin & Ruhl, Jason
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Enhancing the use of coals by gas reburning-sorbent injection. Volume 3, Gas reburning-sorbent injection at Edwards Unit 1, Central Illinois Light Company

Description: Design work has been completed for a Gas Reburning-Sorbent Injection (GR-SI) system to reduce emissions of NO{sub x}, and SO{sub 2} from a wall fired unit. A GR-SI system was designed for Central Illinois Light Company`s Edwards Station Unit 1, located in Bartonville, Illinois. The unit is rated at 117 MW(e) (net) and is front wall fired with a pulverized bituminous coal blend. The goal of the project was to reduce emissions of NO{sub x} by 60%, from the ``as found`` baseline of 0.98 lb/MBtu (420 mg/MJ), and to reduce emissions of S0{sub 2} by 50%. Since the unit currently fires a blend of high sulfur Illinois coal and low sulfur Kentucky coal to meet an S0{sub 2} limit Of 1.8 lb/MBtu (770 mg/MJ), the goal at this site was amended to meeting this limit while increasing the fraction of high sulfur coal to 57% from the current 15% level. GR-SI requires injection of natural gas into the furnace at the level of the top burner row, creating a fuel-rich zone in which NO{sub x} formed in the coal zone is reduced to N{sub 2}. The design natural gas input corresponds to 18% of the total heat input. Burnout (overfire) air is injected at a higher elevation to burn out fuel combustible matter at a normal excess air level of 18%. Recycled flue gas is used to increase the reburning fuel jet momentum, resulting in enhanced mixing. Recycled flue gas is also used to cool the top row of burners which would not be in service during GR operation. Dry hydrated lime sorbent is injected into the upper furnace to react with S0{sub 2}, forming solid CaSO{sub 4} and CaSO{sub 3}, which are collected by the ESP. The SI system design was optimized with respect to gas temperature, injection air ...
Date: October 1, 1994
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Composition and chemistry of particulates from the Tidd Clean Coal Demonstration Plant pressurized fluidized bed combustor, cyclone, and filter vessel

Description: In a Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC)/cyclone/filter system ground coal and sorbent are injected as pastes into the PFBC bed; the hot gases and entrained fine particles of ash and calcined or reacted sorbent are passed through a cyclone (which removes the larger entrained particles); and the very-fine particles that remain are then filtered out, so that the cleaned hot gas can be sent through a non-ruggedized hot-gas turbine. The 70 MWe Tidd PFBC Demonstration Plant in Brilliant, Ohio was completed in late 1990. The initial design utilized seven strings of primary and secondary cyclones to remove 98% of the particulate matter. However, the Plant also included a pressurized filter vessel, placed between the primary and secondary cyclones of one of the seven strings. Coal and dolomitic limestone (i.e, SO{sub 2} sorbent) of various nominal sizes ranging from 12 to 18 mesh were injected into the combustor operating at about 10 atm pressure and 925{degree}C. The cyclone removed elutriated particles larger than about 0.025 mm, and particles larger than ca. 0.0005 mm were filtered at about 750{degree}C by ceramic candle filters. Thus, the chemical reaction times and temperatures, masses of material, particle-size distributions, and chemical compositions were substantially different for particulates removed from the bed drain, the cyclone drain, and the filter unit. Accordingly, we have measured the particle-size distributions and concentrations of calcium, magnesium, sulfur, silicon, and aluminum for material taken from the three units, and also determined the chemical formulas and predominant crystalline forms of the calcium and magnesium sulfate compounds formed. The latter information is particularly novel for the filter-cake material, from which we isolated the ``new`` compound Mg{sub 2}Ca(SO{sub 4}){sub 3}.
Date: December 31, 1995
Creator: Smith, D.H.; Grimm, U. & Haddad, G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Recovery of lime from coal gasifier waste containing calcium sulfide

Description: Calcium-based materials hold great promise as sorbents for reduced sulfur compounds at high temperature. Such materials are needed for hot gas clean up or for direct addition to coal gasifiers in several types of integrated coal gasification, combined-cycle (IGCC) power generation systems under development. However, their use has been hindered by the lack of a suitable regeneration process for converting CaS back to CaO. Recently, it was discovered in the laboratory that CaS particles can be converted rapidly and almost completely to CaO by a cyclic process which exposures the material alternately and repeatedly to oxidation and reduction at 900 to 1,100 C. During oxidation with air a small portion of CaS is converted to CaSO{sub 4} which upon treatment with a reducing gas is converted to CaO. By repeating the cycle numerous times, individual particles are converted completely to CaO. Such a process can be carried out in a fluidized bed reactor which either has both oxidizing and reducing zones or is supplied with gas that is alternately oxidizing and reducing. The cyclic oxidation/reduction process for converting CaS to CaO has been demonstrated with a thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) systems, and the results are reported below. The effects of temperature and gas composition on the overall rate of conversion are indicated as well as the effect of subjecting typical sorbent materials to repeated sulfidation and regeneration.
Date: October 1, 1995
Creator: Jagtap, S.B. & Wheelock, T.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Pulsed atmospheric fluidized bed combustion. Final report

Description: ThermoChem, under contract to the Department of Energy, conducted extensive research, development and demonstration work on a Pulsed Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustor (PAFBC) to confirm that advanced technology can meet these performance objectives. The ThermoChem/MTCI PAFBC system integrates a pulse combustor with an atmospheric bubbling-bed type fluidized bed combustor (BFBC) In this modular configuration, the pulse combustor burns the fuel fines (typically less than 30 sieve or 600 microns) and the fluidized bed combusts the coarse fuel particles. Since the ThermoChem/MTCI PAFBC employs both the pulse combustor and the AFBC technologies, it can handle the full-size range of coarse and fines. The oscillating flow field in the pulse combustor provides for high interphase and intraparticle mass transfer rates. Therefore, the fuel fines essentially burn under kinetic control. Due to the reasonably high temperature (>1093 C but less than the temperature for ash fusion to prevent slagging), combustion of fuel fines is substantially complete at the exit of the pulse combustor. The additional residence time of 1 to 2 seconds in the freeboard of the PAFBC unit then ensures high carbon conversion and, in turn, high combustion efficiency. A laboratory unit was successfully designed, constructed and tested for over 600 hours to confirm that the PAFBC technology could meet the performance objectives. Subsequently, a 50,000 lb/hr PAFBC demonstration steam boiler was designed, constructed and tested at Clemson University in Clemson, South Carolina. This Final Report presents the detailed results of this extensive and successful PAFBC research, development and demonstration project.
Date: March 1, 1998
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Integrated dry NO{sub x}/SO{sub 2} emissions control system. Final report, Volume 1: Public design

Description: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)/Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) and the Public Services Company of Colorado (PSCo) signed the cooperative agreement for the Integrated Dry NO{sub x}/SO{sub 2} Emissions Control System in March 1991. This project integrates various combinations of five existing and emerging technologies onto a 100 MWe, down-fired, load-following unit that burns pulverized coal. The project is expected to achieve up to 70% reductions in both oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) and sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) emissions. Various combinations of low-NO{sub x} burners (LNBs), overfire air (OFA) ports, selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR), dry sorbent injection (DSI) using both calcium- and sodium-based reagents, and flue-gas humidification are expected to integrate synergistically and control both NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} emissions better than if each technology were used alone. For instance, ammonia emissions from the SNCR system are expected to reduce NO{sub 2} emissions and allow the DSI system (sodium-based reagents) to achieve higher removals of SO{sub 2}. Unlike tangentially or wall-fired units, down-fired require substantial modification to their pressure parts to retrofit LNBs and OFA ports, substantially increasing the cost of retrofit. Conversely, the retrofitting of SNCR, DSI, or humidification systems does not require any major boiler modifications and are easily retrofitted to all boiler types. However, existing furnace geometry and flue-gas temperatures can limit their placement and effectiveness. In particular, SNCR requires injecting the SNCR chemicals into the furnace where the temperature is within a very narrow temperature range.
Date: November 1, 1997
Creator: Hunt, T. & Hanley, T.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Sonic-enhanced ash agglomeration and sulfur capture. Technical progress report, April--June 1997

Description: A major concern with the utilization of coal in directly fired gas turbines is the control of particulate emissions and reduction of sulfur dioxide, and alkali vapor from combustion of coal, upstream of the gas turbine. The results of this research and development indicate that both acoustic agglomeration of particulates and direct injection of sorbents have the potential to become a significant emissions control strategy. The Sonic Enhanced Ash Agglomeration and Sulfur Capture program focuses upon the application of an MTCI proprietary invention (Patent No. 5,197,399) for simultaneously enhancing sulfur capture and particulate agglomeration of the combustor effluent. The major objective of the Phase 1 test program is to confirm the feasibility of the MTCI bimodal particle size approach to enhance particulate control by acoustic ash agglomeration, and to demonstrate and confirm the feasibility of an acoustic field to enhance sulfur capture by increasing sorbent reactivity. During this reporting period, commercialization activity was continued.
Date: December 31, 1997
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Sonic-enhanced ash agglomeration and sulfur capture. Technical progress report, July--September 1997

Description: A major concern with the utilization of coal in directly fired gas turbines is the control of particulate emissions and reduction of sulfur dioxide, and alkali vapor from combustion of coal, upstream of the gas turbine. The results of this research and development indicate that both acoustic agglomeration of particulates and direct injection of sorbents have the potential to become a significant emissions control strategy. The Sonic Enhanced Ash Agglomeration and Sulfur Capture program focuses upon the application of an MTCI proprietary invention (Patent No. 5,197,399) for simultaneously enhancing sulfur capture and particulate agglomeration of the combustion effluent. The major objective of the Phase 1 test program is to confirm the feasibility of the MTCI bimodal particle size approach to enhance particulate control by acoustic ash agglomeration and to demonstrate and confirm the feasibility of an acoustic field to enhance sulfur capture by increasing sorbent reactivity. During this report period, commercialization activity was continued. Also, a time extension for the contract at no additional cost to the Department of Energy was requested. The request was granted and the period of performance was extended to March 31, 1998.
Date: December 31, 1997
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Sonic-enhanced ash agglomeration and sulfur capture. Technical progress report, October--December 1997

Description: A major concern with the utilization of coal in directly fired gas turbines is the control of particulate emissions and reduction of sulfur dioxide, and alkali vapor from combustion of coal, upstream of the gas turbine. The results of this research and development indicate that both acoustic agglomeration of particulates and direct injection of sorbents have the potential to become a significant emissions control strategy. The Sonic Enhanced Ash Agglomeration and Sulfur Capture program focuses upon the application of an MTCI proprietary invention (Patent No. 5,197,399) for simultaneously enhancing sulfur capture and particulate agglomeration of the combustor effluent. The major objective of the Phase 1 test program is to confirm the feasibility of the MTCI bimodal particle size approach to enhance particulate control by acoustic ash agglomeration and to demonstrate and confirm the feasibility of an acoustic field to enhance sulfur capture by increasing sorbent reactivity. During this reporting period, additional fabrication work was carried out and final report preparation was started.
Date: December 31, 1997
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development and testing of industrial scale, coal-fired combustion system, Phase 3. Nineteenth quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1996--September 30, 1996

Description: In the third quarter of calendar year 1996, 13 days of combust-boiler tests were performed, including 3 days of tests on a parallel DOE sponsored project on sulfur retention in a stagging combustor. Between tests, modifications and improvements that were indicated by these tests were implemented. This brings the total number of test days to the end of September in the task 5 effort to 41, increased to 46 as of the date of this Report, 10/27/96. This compares with a total of 63 test days needed to complete the task 5 test effort. As reported previously, the only major modification to the Williamsport combustor has been the addition of a new downstream section, which lengthens the combustor and improves the combustor-boiler interface. The original combustor section, which includes the fuel, air, and cooling water delivery systems remained basically unchanged. Only the refractory liner was completely replaced, a task which occurs on an annual basis in all commercial stagging utility combustors. Therefore, this combustor has been operated since 1988 without replacement.
Date: October 27, 1996
Creator: Zauderer, B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Advanced in-duct sorbent injection for SO{sub 2} control. Topical report No. 6, Task 5: Conceptual commercial process design and economic evaluation

Description: The objective of this research project is the development of a second generation in-duct sorbent injection technology as a cost-effective compliance option for the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. Research focused on the Advanced Coolside Process, which has shown the potential of exceeding the performance targets of 90% SO{sub 2} removal and 60% sorbent utilization. In Task 5, Conceptual Process Design and Economic Evaluation, the economics of the CONSOL Advanced Coolside Process as a Clean Air Act compliance option were evaluated. A conceptual process design for full-scale, coal-fired applications is described. Advanced Coolside is compared to conventional Limestone Forced Oxidation (LSFO) wet FGD technology. The process economics for coal sulfur levels ranging from 1.0% to 3.5% (as-received) and plant sizes ranging from 160 to 512 gross MW were investigated, In addition, the economics of on-site versus off-site lime hydration and the cost sensitivity to delivered pebble lime and hydrate prices are investigated, Advanced in-duct sorbent injection enjoys a capital and levelized cost advantage relative to LSFO in all cases examined in this study. As a result of this study and others made during this contract, the following conclusions can be made: (1) The capital cost of Advanced Coolside is 55% to 60% less than that of LSFO and varies slightly depending on coal sulfur content and plant size. (2) The total levelized SO{sub 2} control cost advantage relative to LSFO varies from 15% to 35% over the range of coal sulfur contents and plant sizes evaluated. This cost advantage is sensitive to sorbent transportation charges. As a result, the economics are site-specific. (3) The experimental optimizations based on interim economic analyses were the key to capital and levelized cost reductions.
Date: December 1, 1994
Creator: Deluliis, N.J. & Maskew, J.T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An attrition-resistant zinc titanate sorbent for sulfur; [Quarterly] report, September 1--November 30, 1993

Description: In the continuing search for good sorbent materials to remove sulfur from hot, coal-derived gases, zinc titanate sorbents have shown great promise. The objective of this project is to extend the effort started last year on increasing the strength and durability of zinc titanate sorbents with little or no loss in chemical reactivity. The principle is to contain Zn{sub 2}TiO{sub 4} in a structural matrix of excess TiO{sub 2}. A fluidized bed test was completed this quarter on the first of two promising sorbent formulations. The chemical reactivity in the form of breakthrough curves became progressively better over ten sulfidation-regeneration cycles. While the chemical reactivity was very good, the attrition resistance was only fair, due presumably to the conversion of Zn{sub 2}TiO{sub 4} to ZnTiO{sub 3} during cycling. The next formulation to be tested is expected to be better in attrition resistance.
Date: March 1, 1994
Creator: Swisher, J.H.; O`Brien, W.S. & Gupta, R.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department