203 Matching Results

Search Results

Advanced search parameters have been applied.

An Investigation of Aircraft Heaters XXVIII : Equations for Steady-State Temperature Distribution Caused by Thermal Sources in Flat Plates Applied to Calculation of Thermocouple Errors, Heat-meter Corrections, and Heat Transfer by Pin-fin Plates

Description: Report presenting an equation for steady-sate temperature distribution caused by a thermal source (or sink) in a flat plate surrounded on either side by fluids of different temperature and applications for three sections in the report.
Date: August 1948
Creator: Boelter, L. M. K.; Romie, F. E.; Guibert, A. G. & Miller, M. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Preliminary survey of possible methods for hypersonic aircraft

Description: Report presenting an investigation conducted to determine the relative advantages and limitations of a number of fluids for use as either heat sinks or coolants for hypersonic aircraft. The feasibility of the fluids tested as heat sinks and cooling in the high-level and low-level regions is described.
Date: May 12, 1958
Creator: Esgar, Jack B.; Hickel, Robert O. & Stepka, Francis S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Eliasch Report: Carbon absorption and storage

Description: This report provides details about carbon sequestration in the wood and soils of different types of forest (tropical, boreal, temperate) and states the policy implications that apply to the energy and forestry sectors. The report includes recommendations for the relationship between carbon sequestration and sustainable forestry.
Date: unknown
Creator: Franco, Miguel
Partner: UNT Libraries

[Junebug taking a bath]

Description: Photograph of Junebug Clark in the kitchen sink taking a bath. In the image, Clark looks surprised towards the camera while bottles and bowls can be seen on the counter behind him.
Date: unknown
Creator: Clark, Joe
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

The Effect of Sink Temperature on a Capillary Pumped Loop Employing a Flat Evaporator and Shell and Tube Condenser

Description: An experimental facility for conducting research on capillary pumped loop (CPL) systems was developed. In order to simulate shipboard cooling water encountered at various locations of the ocean, the heat sink temperature of the facility could be varied. A flat plate, CPL evaporator was designed and tested under various heat sink temperatures. The sink temperature ranged from 274.3 to 305.2 K and the heat input varied from 250 to 800 W which corresponds to heat fluxes up to 1.8 W/cm{sup 2}. The CPL flat plate evaporator performed very well under this range of heat input and sink temperatures. The main result obtained showed that a large degree of subcooling developed between the evaporator vapor outlet line and liquid return line. This condensate depression increased with increasing heat input.
Date: June 24, 2002
Creator: Cerza, M.; Herron, R.C. & Harper, J.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Rosetta Resources CO2 Storage Project - A WESTCARB GeologicPilot Test

Description: WESTCARB, one of seven U.S. Department of Energypartnerships, identified (during its Phase I study) over 600 gigatonnesof CO2 storage capacity in geologic formations located in the Westernregion. The Western region includes the WESTCARB partnership states ofAlaska, Arizona, California, Nevada, Oregon and Washington and theCanadian province of British Columbia. The WESTCARB Phase II study iscurrently under way, featuring three geologic and two terrestrial CO2pilot projects designed to test promising sequestration technologies atsites broadly representative of the region's largest potential carbonsinks. This paper focuses on two of the geologic pilot studies plannedfor Phase II -referred to-collectively as the Rosetta-Calpine CO2 StorageProject. The first pilot test will demonstrate injection of CO2 into asaline formation beneath a depleted gas reservoir. The second test willgather data for assessing CO2 enhanced gas recovery (EGR) as well asstorage in a depleted gas reservoir. The benefit of enhanced oil recovery(EOR) using injected CO2 to drive or sweep oil from the reservoir towarda production well is well known. EaR involves a similar CO2 injectionprocess, but has received far less attention. Depleted natural gasreservoirs still contain methane; therefore, CO2 injection may enhancemethane production by reservoir repressurization or pressure maintenance.CO2 injection into a saline formation, followed by injection into adepleted natural gas reservoir, is currently scheduled to start inOctober 2006.
Date: January 30, 2006
Creator: Trautz, Robert; Benson, Sally; Myer, Larry; Oldenburg, Curtis; Seeman, Ed; Hadsell, Eric et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Enhancement of Terrestrial Carbon Sinks through the Reclamation of Abandoned Mined Lands

Description: This project will determine the optimal forest management method to employ for each of the major commercial tree species so that profitability of timber production only or the combination of timber production and carbon sequestration is maximized. The goal of this project is to achieve DOE's long-term cost goal of sequestering carbon at $10 or less per ton. Because the potential of a forest ecosystem to sequester carbon depends on the species, site quality and management regimes utilized, this project will determine how to optimize carbon sequestration by determining how to optimally manage each species, given a range of site qualities and economic variables. This project also will determine the effects of a carbon credit market on the method and profitability of forest management, the cost of sequestering carbon, and the amount of carbon that can be sequestered. Information from this project will be used to produce user-friendly manuals which will contain economic and biological data for each of the species. These manuals will inform landowners and forest managers how to manage forests for timber and/or carbon credits, how to maximize financial returns, how much money can be earned, and how much carbon can be stored. Manuals will be disseminated through state and federal agricultural extension services and the forest service of each state, and will be published in forest landowner magazines.
Date: April 30, 2005
Creator: Kronrad, Gary
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Enhancement of Terrestrial Carbon Sinks through the Reclamation of Abandoned Mined Lands

Description: This project will determine the optimal forest management method to employ for each of the major commercial tree species so that profitability of timber production only or the combination of timber production and carbon sequestration is maximized. The goal of this project is to achieve DOE's long-term cost goal of sequestering carbon at $10 or less per ton. Because the potential of a forest ecosystem to sequester carbon depends on the species, site quality and management regimes utilized, this project will determine how to optimize carbon sequestration by determining how to optimally manage each species, given a range of site qualities and economic variables. This project also will determine the effects of a carbon credit market on the method and profitability of forest management, the cost of sequestering carbon, and the amount of carbon that can be sequestered. Information from this project will be used to produce user-friendly manuals which will contain economic and biological data for each of the species. These manuals will inform landowners and forest managers how to manage forests for timber and/or carbon credits, how to maximize financial returns, how much money can be earned, and how much carbon can be stored. Manuals will be disseminated through state and federal agricultural extension services and the forest service of each state, and will be published in forest landowner magazines.
Date: October 31, 2004
Creator: Kronrad, Gary
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Enhancement of Terrestrial Carbon Sinks through the Reclamation of Abandoned Mined Lands

Description: This project will determine the optimal forest management method to employ for each of the major commercial tree species so that profitability of timber production only or the combination of timber production and carbon sequestration is maximized. The goal of this project is to achieve DOE's long-term cost goal of sequestering carbon at $10 or less per ton. Because the potential of a forest ecosystem to sequester carbon depends on the species, site quality and management regimes utilized, this project will determine how to optimize carbon sequestration by determining how to optimally manage each species, given a range of site qualities and economic variables. This project also will determine the effects of a carbon credit market on the method and profitability of forest management, the cost of sequestering carbon, and the amount of carbon that can be sequestered. Information from this project will be used to produce user-friendly manuals which will contain economic and biological data for each of the species. These manuals will inform landowners and forest managers how to manage forests for timber and/or carbon credits, how to maximize financial returns, how much money can be earned, and how much carbon can be stored. Manuals will be disseminated through state and federal agricultural extension services and the forest service of each state, and will be published in forest landowner magazines.
Date: January 31, 2006
Creator: Kronrad, Gary
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS): A Primer

Description: Report describing Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS), how it is supposed to work, why it has gained the interest and support of some members of Congress, and what some of the challenges are to its implementation and deployment across the United States.
Date: July 16, 2013
Creator: Folger, Peter
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Seasonal and inter-annual variability in 13C composition of ecosystem carbon fluxes in the U.S. Southern Great Plains

Description: The {delta}{sup 13}C signature of terrestrial carbon fluxes ({delta}{sub bio}) provides an important constraint for inverse models of CO{sub 2} sources and sinks, insight into vegetation physiology, C{sub 3} and C{sub 4} vegetation productivity, and ecosystem carbon residence times. From 2002-2009, we measured atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration and {delta}{sup 13}C-CO{sub 2} at four heights (2 to 60 m) in the U.S. Southern Great Plains (SGP) and computed {delta}{sub bio} weekly. This region has a fine-scale mix of crops (primarily C{sub 3} winter wheat) and C{sub 4} pasture grasses. {delta}{sub bio} had a large and consistent seasonal cycle of 6-8{per_thousand}. Ensemble monthly mean {delta}{sub bio} ranged from -25.8 {+-} 0.4{per_thousand} ({+-}SE) in March to -20.1 {+-} 0.4{per_thousand} in July. Thus, C{sub 3} vegetation contributed about 80% of ecosystem fluxes in winter-spring and 50% in summer-fall. In contrast, prairie-soil {delta}{sub 13}C values were about -15{per_thousand}, indicating that historically the region was dominated by C{sub 4} vegetation and had more positive {delta}{sub bio} values. Based on a land-surface model, isofluxes ({delta}{sub bio} x NEE) in this region have large seasonal amplitude because {delta}{sub bio} and net ecosystem exchange (NEE) covary. Interannual variability in isoflux was driven by variability in NEE. The large seasonal amplitude in {delta}{sub bio} and isoflux imply that carbon inverse analyses require accurate estimates of land cover and temporally resolved {sup 13}CO{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} fluxes.
Date: September 22, 2010
Creator: Torn, M. S.; Biraud, S.; Still, C. J.; Riley, W. J. & Berry, J. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

100% Renewable Energy - and Beyond - for Cities

Description: This booklet sketches out the options and the processes that have started to transform urban energy systems. The document promotes carbon neutrality for communities and cities and argues that even the largest cities can make this transition, drawing on renewable energy supplies from within their boundaries, as well as from farther away. In addition to assuring urban energy security, these developments can also stimulate the growth of a very large new green economy sector.
Date: March 2010
Creator: Droege, Peter
Partner: UNT Libraries

The effect of elevated carbon dioxide on a Sierra-Nevadan dominant species: Pinus ponderosa

Description: The impact of increasing atmospheric C0{sub 2} has not been fully evaluated on western coniferous forest species. Two year old seedlings of Pinusponderosa were grown in environmentally controlled chambers under increased C0{sub 2} conditions for 6 months. These trees exhibit morphological, physiological, and biochemical alterations when compared to our controls. Analysis of whole plant biomass distribution has shown no significant effect to the root to shoot ratios, however needles subjected to elevated C0{sub 2} exhibited an increased overall specific needle mass and a decreased total needle area. Morphological changes at the needle level included decreased mesophyll to vascular tissue 91 ratio and variations in starch storage in chloroplasts. The elevated CO{sub 2} increased internal CO{sub 2} concentrations and assimilation of carbon. Biochemical assays revealed that ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase specific activities increased on per unit area basis with C0{sub 2} treatment levels. Sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) activities exhibited an increase of 55% in the 700 uL L{sup {minus}1} treatment. These results indicate that the sink-source relationships of these trees have shifted carbon allocation toward above ground growth, possibly due to transport limitations.
Date: January 1, 1995
Creator: Pushnik, J.C.; Demaree, R.S.; Flory, W.B.; Bauer, S.M.; Houpis, J.L.J. & Anderson, P.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A comparison of stresses in armor joints with and without interlayers

Description: Reliable joining of armor to heat sinks for plasma facing components has been a persistent problem in fusion and a concern for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Post-fabrication and operating stresses in heat sinks with a 1mm compliant layer (or no interlayer) between tungsten armor and a CuCrZr channel were analyzed with a 2-D finite element model with temperature dependent properties, generalized plane strain, and strain hardening.
Date: November 1, 1997
Creator: Nygren, R.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Carbon transport in the bottom boundary layer. Final report

Description: This report summarizes the activities and findings from a field experiment devised to estimate the rates and mechanisms of transport of carbon across the continental shelves. The specific site chosen for the experiment was the mid-Atlantic Bight, a region off the North Carolina coast. The experiment involved a large contingent of scientists from many institutions. The specific component of the program was the transport of carbon in the bottom boundary layer. The postulate mechanisms of transport of carbon in the bottom boundary layer are: resuspension and advection, downward deposition, and accumulation. The high turbulence levels in the bottom boundary layer require the understanding of the coupling between turbulence and bottom sediments. The specific issues addressed in the work reported here were: (a) What is the sediment response to forcing by currents and waves? (b) What is the turbulence climate in the bottom boundary layer at this site? and (c) What is the rate at which settling leads to carbon sequestering in bottom sediments at offshore sites?
Date: October 5, 1998
Creator: Agrawal, Y.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A modified heat leak test facility employing a closed-cycle helium refrigerator

Description: A Heat Leak Test Facility (HLTF) has been in use at Fermilab for many years. The apparatus has successfully measured the thermal performance of a variety of cryostat components under simulated operating conditions. While an effective tool in the cryostat design process, the HLTF has several limitations. Temperatures are normally fixed at cryogen boiling points and run times are limited to cryogen inventory. Moreover, close personnel attention is required to maintain system inventories and sustain system equilibrium. To provide longer measurement periods without perturbation and to minimize personnel interaction, a new heat leak measurement facility (HLTF-2) has been designed that incorporates a closed-cycle helium refrigerator. The two-stage refrigerator provides cooling to the various temperature stations of the HLTF while eliminating the need for cryogens. Eliminating cryogen inventories has resulted in a reduction of the amount of direct personnel attention required.
Date: January 1, 1996
Creator: Boroski, W.N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

{sup 210}Pb dating of sediments from the central and the northern Adriatic Sea: The deposition and preservation of sedimentary organic carbon

Description: A central goal of the ELNA project is to assess the carbon assimilation capacity of the Northern Adriatic Sea. This requires fundamental quantitative information on budgets and sinks of organic carbon. Any change in carbon production in the water column should be reflected in the underlying sediments. Moreover, the fraction of particulate organic carbon reaching the sea floor which is subsequently preserved in the sediment will be strongly coupled to sediment accumulation and mixing. In this study a series of box cores were collected in order to characterize a hypothetical eutrophication gradient extending from the Po River outflow region in the north down to the shallow meso-Adriatic depression (Jabuka Pit). The main tasks assigned to IAEA-MEL were to provide {sup 210}Pb derived sedimentation and dry-mass accumulation rates and to examine the possible correlations between sedimentary processes, the deposition and preservation of sedimentary organic carbon and pelagic primary productivity.
Date: April 1, 1996
Creator: Hamilton, T.; Fowler, S.; Miquel, J.C. & La Rosa, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department