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Economic and technical analysis of distributed utility benefits for hydrogen refueling stations. Final report

Description: This report presents the potential economic benefits of operating hydrogen refueling stations to accomplish two objectives: supply pressurized hydrogen for vehicles, and supply distributed utility generation, transmission and distribution peaking energy and capacity to the utility. The study determined under what circumstances using a hydrogen-fueled generator as a distributed utility generation source, co-located with the hydrogen refueling station components (electrolyzer and storage), would result in cost savings to the station owner, and hence lower hydrogen production costs. The systems studied include a refueling station (including such components as an electrolyzer, storage, hydrogen dispensers, and compressors) plus on-site hydrogen fueled electricity generation units (e.g., fuel cells or combustion engines). The operational strategy is to use off-peak electricity in the electrolyzer to fill hydrogen storage, and to dispatch the electricity generation about one hour per day to meet the utility`s local and system peaks. The utility was assumed to be willing to pay for such service up to its avoided generation, fuel, transmission and distribution costs.
Date: April 1, 1998
Creator: Iannucci, J.J.; Eyer, J.M.; Horgan, S.A. & Schoenung, S.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Central airport energy systems using alternate energy sources

Description: The purpose of this project was to develop the concept of a central airport energy system designed to supply energy for aircraft ground support and terminal complex utility systems using municipal waste as a fuel. The major task was to estimate the potential for reducing aircraft and terminal fuel consumption by the use of alternate renewable energy sources. Additional efforts included an assessment of indirect benefits of reducing airport atmospheric and noise pollution.
Date: July 1, 1982
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Building a 40% Energy Saving House in the Mixed-Humid Climate

Description: This report describes a home that uses 40% less energy than the energy-efficient Building America standard - a giant step in the pursuit of affordable near-zero-energy housing through the evolution of five near-zero-energy research houses. This four-bedroom, two-bath, 1232-ft2 house has a Home Energy Rating System (HERS) index of 35 (a HERS rating of 0 is a zero-energy house, a conventional new house would have a HERS rating of 100), which qualifies it for federal energy efficiency and solar incentives. The house is leading to the planned construction of a similar home in Greensburg, Kansas, and 21 staff houses in the Walden Reserve, a 7000-unit "deep green" community in Cookville, Tennessee. Discussions are underway for construction of similar houses in Charleston, South Carolina, Seattle, Washington, Knoxville and Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and upstate New York. This house should lead to a 40% and 50% Gate-3, Mixed-Humid-Climate Joule for the DOE Building America Program. The house is constructed with structurally-insulated-panel walls and roof, raised metal-seam roof with infrared reflective coating, airtight envelope (1.65 air changes per hour at 50 Pascal), supply mechanical ventilation, ducts inside the conditioned space, extensive moisture control package, foundation geothermal space heating and cooling system, ZEHcor wall, solar water heater, and a 2.2 kWp grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) system. The detailed specifications for the envelope and the equipment used in ZEH5 compared to all the houses in this series are shown in Tables 1 and 2. Based on a validated computer simulation of ZEH5 with typical occupancy patterns and energy services for four occupants, energy for this all-electric house is predicted to cost only $0.66/day ($0.86/day counting the hookup charges). By contrast, the benchmark house would require $3.56/day, including hookup charges (these costs are based on a 2006 residential rates of $0.07/kWh and solar buyback at $0.15/kWh). The solar ...
Date: October 2011
Creator: Christian, Jeffrey E. & Bonar, Jacob
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Intermediate Photovoltaic System Application Experiment. Oklahoma Center for Science and Arts. Phase II. Final report

Description: This report presents the key results of the Phase II efforts for the Intermediate PV System Applications Experiment at the Oklahoma Center for Science and Arts (OCSA). This phase of the project involved fabrication, installation and integration of a nominal 140 kW flat panel PV system made up of large, square polycrystalline-silicon solar cell modules, each nominally 61 cm x 122 cm in size. The output of the PV modules, supplied by Solarex Corporation, was augmented, 1.35 to 1 at peak, by a row of glass reflectors, appropriately tilted northward. The PV system interfaces with the Oklahoma Gas and Electric Utility at the OCSA main switchgear. Any excess power generated by the system is fed into the utility under a one to one buyback arrangement. Except for a shortfall in the system output, presently suspected to be due to the poor performance of the modules, no serious problems were encountered. Certain value engineering changes implemented during construction and early operational failure events associated with the power conditioning system are also described. The system is currently undergoing extended testing and evaluation.
Date: January 1, 1984
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Photovoltaics for residential applications

Description: Information is given about the parts of a residential photovoltaic system and considerations relevant to photovoltaic power use in homes that are also tied to utility lines. In addition, factors are discussed that influence implementation, including legal and environmental factors such as solar access and building codes, insurance, utility buyback, and system longevity. (LEW)
Date: February 1, 1984
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Summary of proceedings: Oklahoma and Texas wind energy forum, April 2-3, 1981

Description: The Wind Energy Forum for Oklahoma and Texas was held at the Amarillo Quality Inn in Amarillo, Texas on April 2-3, 1981. Its purpose was to bring together the diverse groups involved in wind energy development in the Oklahoma and Texas region to explore the future commercial potential and current barriers to achieving this potential. Major topics of discussion included utility interconnection of wind machines and the buy-back rate for excess power, wind system reliability and maintenance concerns, machine performance standards, and state governmental incentives. A short summary of each presentation is included.
Date: June 1, 1981
Creator: Nelson, S. C. & Ball, D. E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Maximization of revenues for power sales from a solid waste resources recovery facility

Description: The report discusses the actual implementation of the best alternative in selling electrical power generated by an existing waste-to-energy facility, the Metro-Dade County Resources Recovery Plant. After the plant processes and extracts various products out of the municipal solid waste, it burns it to produce electrical power. The price for buying power to satisfy the internal needs of our Resources Recovery Facility (RRF) is substantially higher than the power price for selling electricity to any other entity. Therefore, without any further analysis, it was decided to first satisfy those internal needs and then export the excess power. Various alternatives were thoroughly explored as to what to do with the excess power. Selling power to the power utilities or utilizing the power in other facilities were the primary options.
Date: December 1, 1991
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Profiles in renewable energy: Case studies of successful utility-sector projects

Description: As considerations of fuel diversity, environmental concerns, and market uncertainties are increasingly factored into electric utility resource planning, renewable energy technologies are beginning to find their place in the utility resource portfolio. This document profiles 10 renewable energy projects, utilizing six different renewable resources, that were built in the US throughout the 1980s. The resources include: biomass, geothermal, hydropower, photovoltaics, solar thermal, and wind. For each project, the factors that were key to its success and the development issues that it faced are discussed, as are the project`s cost, performance, and environmental impacts and benefits.
Date: October 1, 1993
Creator: Anson, S.; Sinclair, K. & Swezey, B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Biomass cogeneration. A business assessment

Description: This guide serves as an overview of the biomass cogeneration area and provides direction for more detailed analysis. The business assessment is based in part on discussions with key officials from firms that have adopted biomass cogeneration systems and from organizations such as utilities, state and federal agencies, and banks that would be directly involved in a biomass cogeneration project. The guide is organized into five chapters: biomass cogeneration systems, biomass cogeneration business considerations, biomass cogeneration economics, biomass cogeneration project planning, and case studies.
Date: November 1, 1981
Creator: Skelton, J.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Data report for the Southwest Residential Experiment Station, November 1981

Description: The Southwest Residential Experiment Station (SW RES) is operated in Las Cruces, New Mexico. Physical performance data obtained from the photovoltaic energy systems under test at the SW RES for the month of November 1981, are tabulated.
Date: December 18, 1981
Creator: Lieberman, M.; Hai, O.Y.; Hocking, G. & Whitaker, C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Analysis of PURPA and solar energy

Description: The Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA) is designed to promote energy conservation, the efficient use of utility resources, and equitable rates. PURPA specifically directs the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) to encourage small power production from renewable resources (and also cogeneration of electric energy as well as heat) by setting standards under which facilities qualify for interconnection, and guidelines for sales between utilities and independent facilities. The way FERC carries out this mandate may critically affect the development of solar alternatives to electric power production from fossil and nuclear resources. This report comments on proposed FERC regulations and suggests ways to encourage small power production within the PURPA mandate. In addition, some internal strains within PURPA are analyzed that seem to limit the effectiveness with which FERC can encourage independent facilities, and possible modifications to PURPA are suggested. 255 references.
Date: March 1, 1980
Creator: Rice, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Integration of photovoltaic units into electric utility grids: experiment information requirements and selected issues

Description: A number of investigations have led to the recognition of technical, economic, and institutional issues relating to the interface between solar electric technologies and electric utility systems. These issues derive from three attributes of solar electric power concepts, including (1) the variability and unpredictability of the solar resources, (2) the dispersed nature of those resources which suggest the deployment of small dispersed power units, and (3) a high initial capital cost coupled with relatively low operating costs. An important part of the DOE programs to develop new source technologies, in particular photovoltaic systems, is the experimental testing of complete or nearby complete power units. These experiments provide an opportunity to examine operational and integration issues which must be understood before widespread commercial deployment of these technologies can be achieved. Experiments may also be required to explicitly examine integration, operational, and control aspects of single and multiple new source technology power units within a utility system. An identification of utility information requirements, a review of planned experiments, and a preliminary determination of additional experimental needs and opportunities are presented. Other issues discussed include: (1) the impacts of on-site photovoltaic units on load duration curves and optimal generation mixes are considered; (2) the impacts of on-site photovoltaic units on utility production costs, with and without dedicated storage and with and without sellback, are analyzed; and (3) current utility rate structure experiments, rationales, policies, practices, and plans are reviewed.
Date: September 1, 1980
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Maximization of revenues for power sales from a solid waste resources recovery facility

Description: The report discusses the actual implementation of the best alternative in selling electrical power generated by an existing waste-to-energy facility, the Metro-Dade County Resources Recovery Plant. After the plant processes and extracts various products out of the municipal solid waste, it burns it to produce electrical power. The price for buying power to satisfy the internal needs of our Resources Recovery Facility (RRF) is substantially higher than the power price for selling electricity to any other entity. Therefore, without any further analysis, it was decided to first satisfy those internal needs and then export the excess power. Various alternatives were thoroughly explored as to what to do with the excess power. Selling power to the power utilities or utilizing the power in other facilities were the primary options.
Date: December 1, 1991
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Preliminary analysis of the impact on utility distribution systems of power feedback from residential photovoltaic systems

Description: The objective of this study is to make a preliminary but quantitative assessment of the technical and cost impacts on utility distribution systems resulting from the feedback of power into the grid from on-site residential photovoltaic systems. It was assumed that the photovoltaic systems were intended, and designed, primarily to serve the electric loads of the homes on which they were located. It was further assumed that any power generated in excess of these requirements would be fed back into the utility distribution grid to serve other loads. Results are presented and discussed. (WHK)
Date: March 1, 1979
Creator: Kammer, W.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Photovoltaic mission analysis. Program summary report, 15 August 1978-28 February 1979

Description: The overall objective of the project since its inception has been to support the planning, development, and guidance of the DOE National Photovoltaic Program on a continuing basis by: (1) identifying and evaluating those photovoltaic applications (including total energy applications) that are most likely to lead to significant contributions to the national energy supply, (2) identifying and evaluating attractive opportunities for demonstration programs and other strategies (e.g. tax incentives) that will stimulate the growth of the near-term (1986-2000) photovoltaic markets, and (3) providing technical support to the DOE Photovoltaic Program Office. The work reported is a direct extension and outgrowth of earlier studies. It includes analytical studies in two areas and a continuation of the program support activities that have been a part of the project since its inception. A summary account is given of the first of these studies, a preliminary examination of the technical and cost impact on utility distribution systems of the introduction of grid-connected residential photovoltaic systems that feed back excess photovoltaic electricity into the utility grid. The second study, is a technical and economic evaluation of a novel photovoltaic power plant concept, a hybrid high-concentration system in which thermal energy removed in cooling the photovoltaic cells is used to generate additional electricity in a bottoming-cycle turbine. (WHK)
Date: March 1, 1979
Creator: Leonard, S.L.; Kammer, W.A. & Kelley, W.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Integration of photovoltaic units into electric utility grids: experiment information requirements and selected issues

Description: A number of investigations, including those conducted by The Aerospace Corporation and other contractors, have led to the recognition of technical, economic, and institutional issues relating to the interface between solar electric technologies and electric utility systems. These issues derive from three attributes of solar electric power concepts, including (1) the variability and unpredictability of the solar resources, (2) the dispersed nature of those resources which suggests the feasible deployment of small dispersed power units, and (3) a high initial capital cost coupled with relatively low operating costs. It is imperative that these integration issues be pursued in parallel with the development of each technology if the nation's electric utility systems are to effectively utilize these technologies in the near to intermediate term. Analyses of three of these issues are presented: utility information requirements, generation mix and production cost impacts, and rate structures in the context of photovoltaic units integrated into the utility system. (WHK)
Date: September 1, 1980
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Data report for the Southwest Residential Experiment Station, January 1982

Description: Physical performance data obtained from the photovoltaic energy systems under test at the Southwest Residential Experiment Station in Las Cruces, New Mexico are tabulated and graphed for the month of January, 1982. Data drawn from the Residential Data System (RDS) appears in several formats. A one-page summary is provided as well as a more detailed hour-by-hour tabulation for an average day of the month. Energy histograms are provided, based on RDS data and recording kilowatt hour meters. The histograms also present horizontal and plane-of-array insolation data as well as comments that explain data and/or energy production anomalies. (LEW)
Date: February 23, 1982
Creator: Lieberman, M.; Hai, O. Y.; Hocking, G. & Whitaker, C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

System integration issues of residential solar photovoltaic systems

Description: The objective of this study is to evaluate the economic effects of residential solar PV systems on the utility's revenue, capacity, and energy requirements from the electric utility's perspective and to estimate the price that it might pay for surplus energy compared to what it would charge for deficits. The power and energy generated by the solar PV systems reduce the capital and operating costs that would otherwise be incurred by the utility. These avoided costs suggest what the utility might pay for surplus solar PV energy. The avoided costs are evaluated under three integration hypotheses, namely: (1) the utility has no system storage, (2) the utility has system storage, and (3) the solar PV systems are supported by dedicated storage devices, the purpose of which is to minimize sales to and purchases from the utility. Findings are reported in detail. (WHK)
Date: March 1, 1980
Creator: Yamayee, Z.A. & Peschon, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Analysis of photovoltaic total energy systems for single family residential applications

Description: The performance and cost-effectiveness of three photovoltaic total energy system concepts designed to meet the thermal and electrical demands of a typical single family house are compared. The three photovoltaic total energy system concepts considered are: (1) All-photovoltaic systems. Passively air-cooled photovoltaic panels provide electricity to meet both electrical and thermal demands. (2) Separate-panel systems. Solar thermal panels provide thermal energy, while passively air-cooled photovoltaic panels serve the purely electric demand. (3) Combined thermal/electric panel systems. Water-cooled photovoltaic panels provide both thermal energy (transported by cooling water) and electrical energy to meet the separate thermal and electrical demands. Additional passively air-cooled photovoltaic panels are added, as required, to meet the electrical demand. The thermal demand is assumed to consist of the energy required for domestic hot water and space heating, while the electrical demand includes the energy required for baseload power (lights, appliances, etc.) plus air conditioning. An analysis procedure has been developed that permits definition of the panel area, electrical and/or thermal storage capacity, and utility backup energy level that, in combination, provide the lowest annual energy cost to the homeowner for each system concept for specified assumptions about costs and system operations. The procedure appears capable of being used to approximately any size system using solar collectors, as well as in any application where the thermal and/or electrical demand is being provided by solar energy, with utility or other conventional backup. This procedure has been used to provide results for homes located in Phoenix, Arizona, and Madison, Wisconsin, and to evaluate the effects of array and backup power costs and the desirability of selling excess electrical energy back to the utility. (WHK)
Date: August 1, 1978
Creator: Chobotov, V. & Siegel, B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

User's guide to SERICPAC: A computer program for calculating electric-utility avoided costs rates

Description: SERICPAC is a computer program developed to calculate average avoided cost rates for decentralized power producers and cogenerators that sell electricity to electric utilities. SERICPAC works in tandem with SERICOST, a program to calculate avoided costs, and determines the appropriate rates for buying and selling of electricity from electric utilities to qualifying facilities (QF) as stipulated under Section 210 of PURA. SERICPAC contains simulation models for eight technologies including wind, hydro, biogas, and cogeneration. The simulations are converted in a diversified utility production which can be either gross production or net production, which accounts for an internal electricity usage by the QF. The program allows for adjustments to the production to be made for scheduled and forced outages. The final output of the model is a technology-specific average annual rate. The report contains a description of the technologies and the simulations as well as complete user's guide to SERICPAC.
Date: May 1, 1982
Creator: Wirtshafter, R.; Abrash, M.; Koved, M. & Feldman, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department