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Data base of array characteristics instrument response and data, recorded at NNC

Description: A northern and east-northern parts of Kazakstan Republic are utterly favorable for a placing of seismic stations. There is a very low level of natural and industrial seismic noise. Rocks of Kazakh epi-Hercynian platform have a very good transmissive properties. Geophysical observatories (GOs), now belonging to the Institute of Geophysical Researches of National Nuclear Center of Kazakstan Republic (IGR NNC RK), were established in especially selected low-noise places of Northern Kazakstan, in accordance with Soviet program for nuclear weapons test monitoring. In 1994, these GOs were transferred by Russian Federation into the possession of Kazakstan. A location of GOs is shown on the Fig. 1. According to the studying of seismic noises, jointly implemented by scientists from IGR and IRIS, places, where a `Borovoye` and `Kurchatov` seismic stations are located, are among the best places for seismic observations in the world. A seismic arrays exist in `Borovoye` and `Kurchatov` observatories - in two observatories out four (`Aktiubinsk`, `Borovoye`, `Kurchatov` and `Makanchi`). These two observatories are described in this report. A history of geophysical observatories, conditions of equipment operations (climatic, geological and so on) are presented in this report, as well as it is described the equipment of GOs and seismic arrays, and samples of digital seismograms, recorded on the equipment of various types, are presented in this report. GO `Borovoye` is described in the 2nd chart, GO `Kurchatov` is described in the 3rd chart of the report. The main results of work are presented in the conclusion. A list of used papers, a list of tables and figures is given in the end of the report. 14 refs., 95 figs., 12 tabs.
Date: December 1, 1996
Creator: Bushueva, E.A.; Ermolenko, E.A. & Efremova, N.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

First Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2009

Description: The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The HSAP is responsible for locating and identifying sources of seismic activity and monitoring changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the HSAP works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 44 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. This includes three recently acquired Transportable Array stations located at Cold Creek, Didier Farms, and Phinney Hill. For the Hanford Seismic Network, ten local earthquakes were recorded during the first quarter of fiscal year 2009. All earthquakes were considered as “minor” with magnitudes (Mc) less than 1.0. Two earthquakes were located at shallow depths (less than 4 km), most likely in the Columbia River basalts; five earthquakes at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km), most likely in the sub-basalt sediments); and three earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the basement. Geographically, four earthquakes occurred in known swarm areas and six earthquakes were classified as random events.
Date: March 15, 2009
Creator: Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E. & Devary, Joseph L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Advanced array techniques for unattended ground sensor applications

Description: Sensor arrays offer opportunities to beam form, and time-frequency analyses offer additional insights to the wavefield data. Data collected while monitoring three different sources with unattended ground sensors in a 16-element, small-aperture (approximately 5 meters) geophone array are used as examples of model-based seismic signal processing on actual geophone array data. The three sources monitored were: (Source 01). A frequency-modulated chirp of an electromechanical shaker mounted on the floor of an underground bunker. Three 60-second time-windows corresponding to (a) 50 Hz to 55 Hz sweep, (b) 60 Hz to 70 Hz sweep, and (c) 80 Hz to 90 Hz sweep. (Source 02). A single transient impact of a hammer striking the floor of the bunker. Twenty seconds of data (with the transient event approximately mid-point in the time window.(Source 11)). The transient event of a diesel generator turning on, including a few seconds before the turn-on time and a few seconds after the generator reaches steady-state conditions. The high-frequency seismic array was positioned at the surface of the ground at a distance of 150 meters (North) of the underground bunker. Four Y-shaped subarrays (each with 2-meter apertures) in a Y-shaped pattern (with a 6-meter aperture) using a total of 16 3-component, high-frequency geophones were deployed. These 48 channels of seismic data were recorded at 6000 and 12000 samples per second on 16-bit data loggers. Representative examples of the data and analyses illustrate the results of this experiment.
Date: May 6, 1997
Creator: Followill, F.E.; Wolford, J.K. & Candy, J.V.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Calibration of the Sonseca array with large magnitude regional and teleseismic events

Description: In order to calibrate the Sonseca station, a 19-element short-period seismic array with a 9 km diameter circular aperture located in central Spain (39.68N, 3.96W), wavefield measurements made on observed seismic phases are compared with expected values. Thirty-five well-recorded regional and teleseismic events are used to study bearing and phase velocity estimation properties. Preliminary results indicate that in general the Sonseca array performs well for both regional and teleseismic events for frequencies less than 5 Hz using standard array signal processing techniques. Main findings of this study are: (1) A systematic bias is observed in bearing estimates; the bias is a function of the true bearing for events from the easterly directions of the array and can be mitigated with a simple bias correction. Using a least-squares quadratic polynomial fit, the bearing estimation error can be reduced to less than two or three degrees. (2) Measured signal and noise coherence functions and beamforming suggest that for regional events improved SNR is obtained by beamforming in the frequency band of 0.5 to 4 Hz with a resulting array gain as high as 10 dB. (3) Because the element spacing of Sonseca array corresponds to that of a sparse regional array, spatial aliasing can be observed in narrowband f-K analysis at the higher frequencies. We compare performance of narrowband and broadband frequency-wavenumber (f-k) analysis and suggest preliminary recipes for f-k and beamforming analysis.
Date: July 1, 1996
Creator: Dowla, F.U.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Hanford annual second quarter seismic report, fiscal year 1998: Seismicity on and near the Hanford Site, Pasco, Washington

Description: Hanford Seismic Monitoring provides an uninterrupted collection of high quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network (HSN) for the US Department of Energy and its contractors. The staff also locates and identifies sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, Natural Phenomena Hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the seismic monitoring organization works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of an earthquake on the Hanford Site. The HSN and the Eastern Washington Regional Network (ENN) consist of 42 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Monitoring staff. The operational rate for the second quarter of FY98 for stations in the HSN was 99.92%. The operational rate for the second quarter of FY98 for stations of the EWRN was 99.46%. For the second quarter of FY98, the acquisition computer triggered 159 times. Of these triggers 14 were local earthquakes: 7 (50%) in the Columbia River Basalt Group, 3 (21%) in the pre-basalt sediments, and 4 (29%) in the crystalline basement. The geologic and tectonic environments where these earthquakes occurred are discussed in this report. The most significant seismic event for the second quarter was on March 23, 1998 when a 1.9 Mc occurred near Eltopia, WA and was felt by local residents. Although this was a small event, it was felt at the surface and is an indication of the potential impact on Hanford of seismic events that are common to the Site.
Date: June 1, 1998
Creator: Hartshorn, D.C.; Reidel, S.P. & Rohay, A.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS

Description: Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This proposal takes direct aim at this shortcoming. P/GSI is developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This array will remove the acquisition barrier to record the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore facilitate 9C reservoir imaging. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for ...
Date: September 1, 2002
Creator: Paulsson, Bjorn N.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Seismic monitoring of roadbeds for traffic flow, vehicle characterization, and pavement deterioration

Description: A road-side seismic monitoring system has been developed that includes not only instrumentation and fielding methods, but also data analysis methods and codes. The system can be used as either a passive or active monitoring system. In the passive mode, seismic signals generated by passing vehicles are recorded. Analysis of these signals provides information on the location, speed, length, and weight of the vehicle. In the active mode, designed for monitoring pavement degradation, a vibrating magnetostrictive source is coupled to the shoulder of the road and signals generated are recorded on the opposite side of the road. Analysis of the variation in surface wave velocity at various frequencies (dispersion) is used in an attempt to develop models of the near-surface pavement velocity structure. The monitoring system was tested at two sites in New Mexico, an older two-lane road and a newly-paved section of interstate highway. At the older site, the system was able to determine information about vehicle velocity, wheel-base length and weight. The sites showed significant differences in response and the results indicate the need for further development of the method to extract the most information possible for each site investigated.
Date: January 1, 1998
Creator: Elbring, G.J.; Ormesher, R.C. & Holcomb, D.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Adaptive and mobile ground sensor array.

Description: The goal of this LDRD was to demonstrate the use of robotic vehicles for deploying and autonomously reconfiguring seismic and acoustic sensor arrays with high (centimeter) accuracy to obtain enhancement of our capability to locate and characterize remote targets. The capability to accurately place sensors and then retrieve and reconfigure them allows sensors to be placed in phased arrays in an initial monitoring configuration and then to be reconfigured in an array tuned to the specific frequencies and directions of the selected target. This report reviews the findings and accomplishments achieved during this three-year project. This project successfully demonstrated autonomous deployment and retrieval of a payload package with an accuracy of a few centimeters using differential global positioning system (GPS) signals. It developed an autonomous, multisensor, temporally aligned, radio-frequency communication and signal processing capability, and an array optimization algorithm, which was implemented on a digital signal processor (DSP). Additionally, the project converted the existing single-threaded, monolithic robotic vehicle control code into a multi-threaded, modular control architecture that enhances the reuse of control code in future projects.
Date: December 1, 2003
Creator: Holzrichter, Michael Warren; O'Rourke, William T.; Zenner, Jennifer & Maish, Alexander B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

First Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2008

Description: The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The Hanford Seismic Assessment Team locates and identifies sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the seismic monitoring organization works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 41 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. For the Hanford Seismic Network, forty-four local earthquakes were recorded during the first quarter of fiscal year 2008. A total of thirty-one micro earthquakes were recorded within the Rattlesnake Mountain swarm area at depths in the 5-8 km range, most likely within the pre-basalt sediments. The largest event recorded by the network during the first quarter (November 25, 2007 - magnitude 1.5 Mc) was located within this swarm area at a depth of 4.3 km. With regard to the depth distribution, three earthquakes occurred at shallow depths (less than 4 km, most likely in the Columbia River basalts), thirty-six earthquakes at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km, most likely in the pre-basalt sediments), and five earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the crystalline basement. Geographically, thirty-eight earthquakes occurred in swarm areas and six earth¬quakes were classified as random events.
Date: March 21, 2008
Creator: Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E. & Devary, Joseph L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Event location in the Middle East and North Africa

Description: The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) CTBT R{ampersand}D program has made significant progress towards improving the ability of the IMS seismic network to locate small-magnitude events in the Middle East and North Africa (MIYNA). Given that high-grade ground truth (such as known explosions) has been difficult to obtain in these regions, we have placed a significant effort towards the development of a teleseismically constrained seismic database that provides event locations good to within 20m km. This data set is used to make an initial evaluation of the effectiveness of calibration on the proposed seismic IMS network in the MWNA. Utilizing a surrogate IMS regional network in the Middle East we find that when a seismic event lies within the footprint of the recording network the uncalibrated event locations are good to within about 25 km of the teleseismically constrained (TC) location. Using region-specific static station corrections further reduces this difference to about 20 km. To obtain further improvement in location accuracy we have used the modified kriging technique developed by SNL to interpolate new travel-time corrections. We compare this technique withe other robust linear interpolation techniques with the goal of enhancing the estimation of travel-time corrections. This is important to TC events which we find can have large uncorrelated uncertainties. Finally, we are making a large effort to incorporate LLNL analyst picks on primary and secondary phases and develop azimuth and slownsess estimates horn current IMS arrays to improve/supplement the NEIC picks.
Date: July 1, 1997
Creator: Schultz, C. A.; Myers, S. C. & Ruppert, S. D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Feasibility of Monitoring Continuous Wave Sources with Seismic Arrays

Description: This paper identifies and explores the technical requirements and issues associated with remotely monitoring continuous wave (CW) sources with seismic arrays. Potential approaches to this monitoring problem will be suggested and partially evaluated to expose the monitoring challenges which arise when realistic local geologies and cultural noise sources are considered. The selective directionality and the adaptive noise cancellation properties of arrays are required to observe weak signals while suppressing a colored background punctuated with an unknown distribution of point and sometimes distributive sources. The array is also required to characterize the emitters and propagation environment so as to properly focus on the CW sources of interest while suppressing the remaining emitters. The proper application of arrays requires an appreciation of the complexity of propagation in a non-homogeneous earth. The heterogeneity often limits the available spatial coherence and therefore the size of the army. This adversely impacts the array gain and the array's ability to carefully resolve various emitters. Arrays must also contend with multipath induced by the source and the heterogeneous earth. If the array is to focus on an emitter and realize an enhancement in the signal to noise ratio, methods must be sought to coherently add the desired signal components while suppressing interference which may be correlated with the desired signal. The impact of these and other issues on army design and processing are described and discussed.
Date: March 15, 1999
Creator: Claassen, J.P.; Elbring, G. & Ladd, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Berkeley Seismological Laboratory Seismic Moment Tensor Report for the August 6, 2007 M3.9 Seismic event in central Utah

Description: We have performed a complete moment tensor analysis of the seismic event, which occurred on Monday August 6, 2007 at 08:48:40 UTC 21 km from Mt.Pleasant, Utah. In our analysis we utilized complete three-component seismic records recorded by the USArray, University of Utah, and EarthScope seismic arrays. The seismic waveform data was integrated to displacement and filtered between 0.02 to 0.10 Hz following instrument removal. We used the Song et al. (1996) velocity model to compute Green's functions used in the moment tensor inversion. A map of the stations we used and the location of the event is shown in Figure 1. In our moment tensor analysis we assumed a shallow source depth of 1 km consistent with the shallow depth reported for this event. As shown in Figure 2 the results point to a source mechanism with negligible double-couple radiation and is composed of dominant CLVD and implosive isotropic components. The total scalar seismic moment is 2.12e22 dyne cm corresponding to a moment magnitude (Mw) of 4.2. The long-period records are very well matched by the model (Figure 2) with a variance reduction of 73.4%. An all dilational (down) first motion radiation pattern is predicted by the moment tensor solution, and observations of first motions are in agreement.
Date: August 8, 2007
Creator: Ford, S.; Dreger, D. & Hellweg, P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An Analysis of the Mt. Meron Seismic Array

Description: We have performed a quick analysis of the Mt. Meron seismic array to monitor regional seismic events in the Middle East. The Meron array is the only current array in the Levant and Arabian Peninsula and, as such, might be useful in contributing to event location, identification, and other analysis. Here, we provide a brief description of the array and a review of the travel time and array analysis done to assess its performance.
Date: January 10, 2008
Creator: Pasyanos, M E & Ryall, F
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Third Quater Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2007

Description: The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The Hanford Seismic Assessment Team locates and identifies sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, Natural Phenomena Hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the seismic monitoring organization works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 41 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. For the Hanford Seismic Network, 16 local earthquakes were recorded during the third quarter of fiscal year 2007. The largest event (magnitude 2.0) occurred on April 16, 2007 and was located 4 km southwest of the 400 Area in the Columbia River basalts at a depth of approximately 3 km. Stratigraphically, 7 earthquakes occurred in the Columbia River basalts (approximately 0-5 km depth), 1 earthquake in the pre-basalt sediments (approximately 5-10 km depth), and 8 earthquakes in the crystalline basement (approximately 10-25 km depth). Geographically, 8 earthquakes occurred in swarm areas, and 8 earthquakes were classified as random events. The Hanford SMA network was triggered on the 300 Area and the 400 Area SMA by the 2.0 Mc seismic event that occurred on April 16, 2007. The maximum vertical acceleration was 0.07 % g and the maximum horizontal acceleration was 0.05% g at the 300 Area SMA, 13.5 km from the event. At the 400 Area SMA, only 5.2 km from the ...
Date: September 19, 2007
Creator: Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E. & Devary, Joseph L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

24 CHANNEL GEOPHONE ARRAY FOR HORIZONTAL OR VERTICAL BOREHOLES

Description: This report describes the technical progress on a project to design and construct a multi-channel geophone array that improves tomographic imaging capabilities in both surface and underground mines. Especially important in the design of the array is sensor placement. One issue related to sensor placement is addressed in this report: the method of emplacing the array in a long, horizontal borehole. Improved imaging capabilities will produce energy, environmental, and economic benefits by increasing exploration accuracy and reducing operating costs.
Date: July 1, 2002
Creator: Westman, Erik C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

24-CHANNEL GEOPHONE ARRAY FOR HORIZONTAL OR VERTICAL BOREHOLES

Description: This report describes the technical progress on a project to design and construct a multi-channel geophone array that improves tomographic imaging capabilities in both surface and underground mines. Especially important in the design of the array is sensor placement. One issue related to sensor placement is addressed in this report: the method for orienting the sensor once it is emplaced in the borehole. If the sensors (geophones) do not have the same orientation, the data will be essentially worthless. Improved imaging capabilities will produce energy, environmental, and economic benefits by increasing exploration accuracy and reducing operating costs.
Date: July 1, 2002
Creator: Westman, Erik C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

24-CHANNEL GEOPHONE ARRAY FOR HORIZONTAL OR VERTICAL BOREHOLES

Description: This report describes the technical progress on a project to design and construct a multi-channel geophone array that improves tomographic imaging capabilities in both surface and underground mines. Especially important in the design of the array is sensor placement. One issue related to sensor placement is addressed in this report: the method for clamping the sensor once it is emplaced in the borehole. If the sensors (geophones) are not adequately coupled to the surrounding rock mass, the resulting data will be of very poor quality. Improved imaging capabilities will produce energy, environmental, and economic benefits by increasing exploration accuracy and reducing operating costs.
Date: August 1, 2002
Creator: Westman, Erik C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

24-CHANNEL GEOPHONE ARRAY FOR HORIZONTAL OR VERTICAL BOREHOLES

Description: This report describes the technical progress on a project to design and construct a multi-channel geophone array that improves tomographic imaging capabilities in both surface and underground mines. Especially important in the design of the array is sensor placement. One issue related to sensor placement is addressed in this report: the development of simple, robust, MSHA-acceptable clamping unit. Improved imaging capabilities will produce energy, environmental, and economic benefits by increasing exploration accuracy and reducing operating costs.
Date: July 1, 2002
Creator: Westman, Erik C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

24-CHANNEL GEOPHONE ARRAY FOR HORIZONTAL OR VERTICAL BOREHOLES

Description: This report describes the technical progress on a project to design and construct a multi-channel geophone array that improves tomographic imaging capabilities in both surface and underground mines. Especially important in the design of the array is sensor placement. One issue related to sensor placement is addressed in this report: the method for clamping the sensor once it is emplaced in the borehole. If the sensors (geophones) are not adequately coupled to the surrounding rock mass, the resulting data will be of very poor quality. Improved imaging capabilities will produce energy, environmental, and economic benefits by increasing exploration accuracy and reducing operating costs.
Date: July 1, 2002
Creator: Westman, Erik C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

24-CHANNEL GEOPHONE ARRAY FOR HORIZONTAL OR VERTICAL BOREHOLES

Description: This report describes the technical progress on a project to design and construct a multi-channel geophone array that improves tomographic imaging capabilities in both surface and underground mines. Especially important in the design of the array is sensor placement. One issue related to sensor placement is addressed in this report: the method for clamping the sensor once it is emplaced in the borehole. If the sensors (geophones) are not adequately coupled to the surrounding rock mass, the resulting data will be of very poor quality. Improved imaging capabilities will produce energy, environmental, and economic benefits by increasing exploration accuracy and reducing operating costs.
Date: August 1, 2002
Creator: Westman, Erik C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Seismic Imaging of UXO-Contaminated Underwater Sites (Interim Report)

Description: Finite difference modeling with 2-dimensional models were conducted to evaluate the performance of source-receiver arrays to locate UXO in littoral environments. The model parameters were taken from measurements in coastal areas with typical bay mud and from examples in the literature. Seismic arrays are well suited to focus energy by steering the elements of the array to any point in the medium that acts as an energy source. This principle also applies to seismic waves that are backscattered by buried UXO. The power of the array is particularly evident in strong noise conditions when the signal-to-noise ratio is too low to observe the scattered signal on the seismograms. Using a seismic array, it was possible to detect and locate the UXO with a reliability similar to noise free situations. When the UXO was positioned within 3-6 wavelengths of the incident signal from the source array, the resolution was good enough to determine the dimensions of the UXO from the scattered waves. Beyond this distance this distinction decreased gradually while the location and the center of the UXO were still determined reliably. The location and the dimensions of two adjacent UXO were resolved down to a separation of 1/3 of the dominant wavelength of the incident wave, at which time interference effects began to appear. In the investigated cases, the ability to locate a UXO was independent on the use of a model with a rippled or a flat seafloor, as long as the array was located above the UXO. Nevertheless, the correct parameters of the seafloor interface were obtained in these cases. An investigation to find the correct migration velocity in the sediments to locate the UXO revealed that a range of velocity gradients centered around the correct velocity model produced comparable results, which needs to be further investigated with ...
Date: November 30, 2004
Creator: Gritto, Roland; Korneev, Valeri; Nihei, Kurt & Johnson, Lane
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Hanford annual first quarter seismic report, fiscal year 1998: Seismicity on and near the Hanford Site, Pasco Basin, Washington

Description: Hanford Seismic Monitoring provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network (HSN) for the US Department of Energy and its contractors. The staff also locates and identifies sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, Natural Phenomena Hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the seismic monitoring organization works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of an earthquake on the Hanford Site. The HSN and the Eastern Washington Regional Network (EWRN) consist of 41 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Monitoring staff. The operational rate for the first quarter of FY98 for stations in the HSN was 98.5%. The operational rate for the first quarter of FY98 for stations of the EWRN was 99.1%. For the first quarter of FY98, the acquisition computer triggered 184 times. Of these triggers 23 were local earthquakes: 7 in the Columbia River Basalt Group, and 16 in the crystalline basement. The geologic and tectonic environments where these earthquakes occurred are discussed in this report. The most significant earthquakes in this quarter were a series of six events which occurred in the Cold Creek depression (approximately 4 km SW of the 200 West Area), between November 6 and November 11, 1997. All events were deep (> 15 km) and were located in the crystalline basement. The first event was the largest, having a magnitude of 3.49 M{sub c}. Two events on November 9, 1997 had magnitudes of 2.81 and 2.95 M{sub c}, respectively. The other events had magnitudes between 0.7 and 1.2 M{sub c}.
Date: February 1998
Creator: Hartshorn, D. C.; Reidel, S. P. & Rohay, A. C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation of national seismograph network detection capabilities: Final report. Volume 2

Description: This final report presents detection thresholds, detection probabilities, and location error ellipse projections for the US National Seismic Network (USNSN) with and without real-time cooperative stations in the eastern US. Network simulation methods are used with spectral noise levels at stations in the USNSN and other stations to simulate the processes of excitation, propagation, detection, and processing of seismic phases. The USNSN alone should be capable of detecting 4 or more P waves for shallow crustal earthquakes in nearly all of the eastern and central US at the magnitude 3.8 level. When real-time cooperative stations are used in conjunction with the USNSN, the network should be capable of detecting 4 or more P waves from events 0.2 to 0.3 magnitude units lower. The planned expansion of the USNSN and cooperative stations should improve detection levels by an additional 0.2 to 0.3 magnitudes units in many areas. Location uncertainties for the USNSN should be significantly improved by addition of real-time cooperative stations. Median error ellipses for magnitude 4.5 earthquakes in the eastern and central US depend strongly upon location, but uncertainties should be less than 100 square km in the central US and degrade to 200 square km or more offshore and to the south and north of the international boundaries. Close cooperation with the Canadian National Network should substantially improve detection thresholds and location uncertainties along the Canadian border.
Date: October 1, 1997
Creator: McLaughlin, K.L.; Barker, T.G. & Bennett, T.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Hanford quarterly seismic report -- 97A seismicity on and near the Hanford Site, Pasco Basin, Washington, October 1, 1996 through December 31, 1996

Description: Seismic Monitoring is part of PNNL`s Applied Geology and Geochemistry Group. The Seismic Monitoring Analysis and Repair Team (SMART) operates, maintains, and analyzes data from the hanford Seismic Network (HSN), extending the site historical seismic database and fulfilling US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office requirements and orders. The SMART also maintains the Eastern Washington Regional Network (EWRN). The University of Washington uses the data from the EWRN and other seismic networks in the Northwest to provide the SMART with necessary regional input for the seismic hazards analysis at the Hanford Site. The SMART is tasked to provide an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw seismic data from the HSN located on and around the Hanford Site. These unprocessed data are permanently archived. SMART also is tasked to locate and identify sources of seismic activity, monitor changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site, and build a local earthquake database (processed data) that is permanently archived. Local earthquakes are defined as earthquakes that occur within 46 degrees to 47 degrees west longitude and 119 degrees to 120 degrees north latitude. The data are used by the Hanford contractor for waste management activities, Natural Phenomena Hazards assessments and engineering design and construction. In addition, the seismic monitoring organization works with Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of an earthquake on the Hanford Site.
Date: February 1, 1997
Creator: Hartshorn, D.C. & Reidel, S.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department