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Effects of a Floodwater-Retarding Structure on the Hydrology and Ecology of Trout Creek in Southwestern Wisconsin

Description: Abstract: The primary effect of a floodwater-retarding structure (FRS) on the flow of Trout Creek, Wisconsin, is attenuation of flood peaks. Reduction of flood peaks ranged from 58 to 91 percent during the study period, 1975 to 1979. An inverse relationship exists between sediment concentration and outflow from the FRS during floods. Most sediment stored in the flood pool during floods is released from the reservoir during subsequent reduced discharge. Sediment-trapping efficiency of the FRS was 7 percent during the 4-year study. The bankfull capacity of the channel was reduced from 154 cubic feet per second upstream from the FRS to 65 cubic feet per second downstream. Mean bankfull depth downstream from the FRS has adjusted to a value 45 percent less than upstream from the structure due to the sedimentation of materials transported from the FRS during reduced flows. The FRS was not found to have any significant adverse effect on the arthropod fauna or trout reproduction in Trout Creek from 1975 to 1979. During 1960-1979, winter floods seem to have had the greatest adverse effect on the survival of brown trout eggs and sac fry.
Date: August 1982
Creator: Wentz, Dennis A. & Graczyk, David J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Uranium Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance Data from the Area of the Noatak and Portions of the Baird Mountains and Ambler River Quadrangles, Alaska

Description: From introduction: This report describes work done in the Noatak and portions of the Baird Mountains and Ambler River, Alaska, National Topographic Map Series (NTMS) quadrangles (1:250 000 scale) by the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) as part of the nationwide Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR).
Date: May 1978
Creator: Aamodt, Paul L.; Hill, Dwight E. & Sharp, Robert R., Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Effects of Natural/anthropogenic Stressors and a Chemical Contaminant on Pre and Post Mycorrhizal Colonization in Wetland Plants

Description: Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, colonizing over 80% of all plants, were long thought absent in wetlands; however, recent studies have shown many wetland plants harbor arbuscular mycorrhizae (AM) and dark septate endophytes (DSE). Wetland services such as biodiversity, shoreline stabilization, water purification, flood control, etc. have been estimated to have a global value of $14.9 trillion. Recognition of these vital services is accompanied by growing concern for their vulnerability and continued loss, which has resulted in an increased need to understand wetland plant communities and mycorrhizal symbiosis. Factors regulating AM and DSE colonization need to be better understood to predict plant community response and ultimately wetland functioning when confronting natural and human induced stressors. This study focused on the effects of water quality, hydrology, sedimentation, and hurricanes on AM and DSE colonization in three wetland species (Taxodium distichum, Panicum hemitomon, and Typhal domingensis) and plant communities of coastal wetlands in Southeast Louisiana and effects of an antimicrobial biocide, triclosan (TCS), on AM (Glomus intraradices) spore germination, hyphal growth, hyphal branching, and colonization in fresh water wetland plants (Eclipta prostrata, Hibiscus laevis, and Sesbania herbacea) from bottom land hardwood forest in north central Texas. The former, mesocosm studies simulating coastal marsh vegetation ran for five years. In the latter studies, AM spores and wetland plants were exposed to 0 g/L, 0.4 g/L, and 4.0 g/L TCS concentrations in static renewal and flow through exposures for 21 and 30 days, respectively. AM and DSE colonization was significantly affected by individual and interactions of four independent variables in mesocosm experiments. Similarly, spore germination, hyphal growth, hyphal branching, and AM colonization in selected wetland plants were significantly lowered by exposure to the TCS at environmentally relevant concentrations. However, levels of effects were plant species and fungal propagules specific. My results showed that natural and human ...
Date: August 2013
Creator: Twanabasu, Bishnu Ram
Partner: UNT Libraries

Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance Basic Data for Dallas NTMS Quadrangle, Texas

Description: From abstract: Results of a reconnaissance geochemical survey of the Dallas Quadrangle, Texas are reported. Field and laboratory data are presented for 284 groundwater and 545 stream sediment samples. Statistical and areal distribution plots of uranium and possible uranium-related variables are displayed. A generalized geologic map of the survey area is provided.
Date: July 31, 1981
Creator: National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance Basic Data for Ophir Quadrangle, Alaska

Description: Abstract: Field and laboratory data are presented for 727 water samples from the Ophir Quadrangle, Alaska. The samples were collected by Los Alamos National Laboratory; laboratory analysis and data reporting were performed by the Uranium Resource Evaluation Project at Oak Ridge, Tennessee.
Date: July 31, 1981
Creator: Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance Basic Data for Sheridan Quadrangle, Wyoming

Description: Abstract: Field and laboratory data are presented for 582 water samples and 526 sediment from the Sheridan Quadrangle, Wyoming. The samples were collected and uranium analysis performed by Los Alamos National Laboratory; multielement analysis and data reporting were performed by the Uranium Resource Evaluation Project at Oak Ridge, Tennessee.
Date: August 31, 1981
Creator: National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance Basic Data for St. Michael Quadrangle, Alaska

Description: Abstract: Field and laboratory data are presented for 159 water samples from the St. Michael Quadrangle, Alaska. The samples were collected by Los Alamos National Laboratory; laboratory analysis and data reporting were performed by the Uranium Resource Evaluation Project at Oak Ridge, Tennessee.
Date: July 31, 1981
Creator: National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Limnology of Lago Loiza, Puerto Rico

Description: From purpose and study: The principal objectives of this study were as follows: (1) to determine the existing water-quality conditions in Lago Loiza as reflected by the principal chemical, physical, biological and bacteriological characteristics in the lake and its tributaries. (2) To estimate the reservoir's water budget during the study period, including the contributions from the tributaries and other sources. (3) Estimation of the reservoir's overall nitrogen and phosphorus budget, including the principal sources and sinks of these nutrients. (4) Definition of the sedimentation rate in the reservoir.
Date: February 1980
Creator: Quiñones-Márquez, Ferdinand
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance Basic Data for Roundup Quadrangle, Montana

Description: Abstract: Field and laboratory data are presented for 1,263 water samples and 961 sediment samples from the Roundup Quadrangle, Montana. The samples were collected by Los Alamos National Laboratory; laboratory analysis and data reporting were performed by the Uranium Resource Evaluation Project at Oak Ridge, Tennessee.
Date: August 31, 1981
Creator: Uranium Resource Evaluation Project
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Statistical Analysis and Evaluation of Water-Quality Data for Selected Streams in the Coal Area of East-Central Montana

Description: From purpose and scope: The purpose of this report is to summarize and evaluate water-quality data acquired from streams within the study area from October 1975 through September 1981. This report updates data collected at 9 stations during the initial study and provides new data for 14 stations.
Date: December 1983
Creator: Lambing, John H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Williamsport 1° x 2° NTMS Area, Pennsylvania: Supplemental Data Report

Description: Abstract: This data report presents supplemental analytical results for 1328 stream sediment samples that were collected as part of the SRL-NURE reconnaissance in the National Topographic Map Series (NTMS) Williamsport 1 x 2 quadrangle. Results are reported for 23 elements (extractable U, Ag, As, Ba, Be, Ca, Co, Cr, Cu, K, Li, Mg, Mo, Nb, Ni, P, Pb, Se, Sn, Sr, W, Y, and Zn). Analyses are tabulated and displayed graphically on microfiche. Field data and neutron activation analysis (NAA) were open-filed in DPST-79-146-8 [GJBX-152(79)].
Date: July 1981
Creator: Cook, J. R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Tectonically Controlled Fan Delta and Submarine Fan Sedimentation of Late Miocene Age, Southern Temblor Range, California

Description: From introduction: The objectives of this report are to (1) document the stratigraphic framework of the Santa Margarita Formation and part of the Monterey Shale in the southern Temblor Range, (2) interpret the environments of deposition and depositional processes of the above units, and (3) evaluate the influence of tectonism on Santa Margarita sedimentation, with special attention given to testing the hypothesis of Berry and others (1968).
Date: 1989
Creator: Ryder, Robert T. & Thomson, Alan
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Contribution of Hurricane Ike Storm Surge Sedimentation to Long-term Aggradation of Coastal Marshes in Southeastern Texas and Southwestern Louisiana

Description: Coastal marshes and wetlands are vital natural resources that offer habitats for plants and animals, serve as ecological filtration for soil and water pollutants, and act as protection for coastlines. Fishing, both commercial and sport, has a large economic impact in the study area – the Gulf Coast between Galveston Bay, TX and Oak Grove, LA. The objective of this research was to determine the contribution of Hurricane Ike storm surge sedimentation to long-term marsh aggradation in Texas and Louisiana coastal marshes. The research hypothesized that Hurricane Ike’s storm surge deposit would be equal to decades and possibly even a century’s worth of the average annual non-storm sedimentation. A quantitative field study was performed. The storm surge deposit was examined in a series of 15 transects covering approximately 180 km east of Hurricane Ike’s landfall. Nine of the 15 transects were re-surveyed a year after the initial measurement to assess preservation of the deposit. The results demonstrate that Hurricane Ike contributed between 10 to 135 years’ worth of sediment to coastal marshes along the coasts of Texas and Louisiana, and the sediment deposits have been preserved for over two years.
Date: August 2013
Creator: Denlinger, Emily E.
Partner: UNT Libraries