Search Results

Advanced search parameters have been applied.

Diverse Learners in the Classroom: Students with Special Needs Enrolled in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Texas Public Classrooms

Description: The purpose of this study was to determine if students with special needs participating in an inclusive classroom can learn the skills related to a STEM career as compared to the general student population. The study involved seventh grade students from two rural middle schools in north central Texas and was framed through a constructivist lens using a quasi-experimental design with a convenience sample. The Solenoid Invention Kit Assessment and the STEM Semantics Survey used in this study were used from a previously large existing dataset from a grant funded by the National Science Foundation for Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers. Findings suggested that there were no significant differences between the general student population and students with special needs. However, STEM coursework in an inclusive classroom may impact students' decision to pursue STEM careers.
Access: Restricted to UNT Community Members. Login required if off-campus.
Date: August 2019
Creator: Briones, San Juanita G
Partner: UNT Libraries

Stem Cell Regulation Using Nanofibrous Membranes with Defined Structure and Pore Size

Description: Electrospun nanofibers have been researched extensively in the culturing of stem cells to understand their behavior since electrospun fibers mimic the native extracellular matrix (ECM) in many types of mammalian tissues. Here, electrospun nanofibers with defined structure (orientation/alignment) and pore size could significantly modulate human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) behavior. Controlling the fiber membrane pore size was predominantly influenced by the duration of electrospinning, while the alignment of the fiber membrane was determined by parallel electrode collector design. Electric field simulation data provided information on the electrostatic interactions in this electrospinning apparatus.hMSCs on small-sized pores (~3-10 µm²) tended to promote the cytoplasmic retention of Yes-associated protein (YAP), while larger pores (~30-45 µm²) promoted the nuclear activation of YAP. hMSCs also displayed architecture-mediated behavior, as the cells aligned along with the fiber membranes orientation. Additionally, fiber membranes affected nuclear size and shape, indicating changes in cytoskeletal tension, which coincided with YAP activity. The mechanistic understanding of hMSC behavior on defined nanofiber structures seeks to advance their translation into more clinical settings and increase biomanufacturing efficiencies.
This item is restricted from view until September 1, 2024.
Date: August 2022
Creator: Blake, Laurence A
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

Understanding Melanocyte Stem Cells for Disease Modeling and Regenerative Medicine Applications

Description: This review highlights recent studies and progress involved in understanding the development of cutaneous melanocytes and the regulation of McSCs. Melanocytes in the skin play an indispensable role in the pigmentation of skin and its appendages. It is well known that the embryonic origin of melanocytes is neural crest cells. In adult skin, functional melanocytes are continuously repopulated by the differentiation of melanocyte stem cells (McSCs) residing in the epidermis of the skin.
Date: December 21, 2015
Creator: Mull, Amber N.; Zolekar, Ashwini & Wang, Yu-Chieh
Partner: UNT Health Science Center
open access

Introduction: Gender Equity in STEM in Higher Education: International Perspectives on Policy, Institutional Culture, and Individual Choice

Description: This introduction presents an overview of the key concepts discussed in the subsequent chapters of this book. The book provides an international overview of access and success for women in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) undergraduate programs. It focuses on women’s share of STEM graduates to explore trends and compare women’s enrollment in STEM to men’s enrollment in STEM and to higher education in general. The book focuses on the expansion of higher education in Taiwan as it relates to the improved participation of women in STEM tertiary education and in the STEM labor market. It focuses on the persistence of gender inequality in undergraduate engineering education in Germany by analyzing individual factors that contribute to women’s tendency to consider but then opt out of engineering. The book describes several challenges to gender-based equity in STEM in a post-Soviet context and offer multiple policy suggestions for improvement.
Date: July 12, 2021
Creator: Ro, Hyun; Ramon, Elizabeth J. & Fernandez, Frank
Partner: UNT College of Education
open access

Gender Differences in 7th Grade Students' Interest in STEM after Participating in a Solenoid Instructional Unit

Description: Paper presented at the 2019 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition. The research presented studies achievement scores and affinity towards STEM scores of male and female students after participating in a unit focused on understanding a solenoid.
Date: 2019-06-15/2019-06-19
Creator: Tyler-Wood, Tandra L.; Smith, Daniella & Johnson, Karen R.
Partner: UNT College of Information
open access

A Comprehensive Approach to Addressing Gender Equity in STEM Subjects at Four-Year Universities in England

Description: This chapter explores gender disparities in enrollment and persistence in STEM undergraduate education in England. The authors examine the difference in early educational achievement in mathematics and science subjects and students’ plan to study STEM subjects by gender. They also examine women’s odds of studying STEM subjects in England after controlling for academic performance and social class characteristics. The authors also particularly test gendered differences in studying STEM at prestigious Russell Group universities. Finally, the authors highlight factors that policy makers, researchers, instructors, and STEM workforce members should consider to close gender gaps in STEM undergraduate education.
Date: July 12, 2021
Creator: Ro, Hyun; Fernandez, Frank & Alcott, Benjamin
Partner: UNT College of Education
open access

Conclusion: Unique but Transferable Approaches for Pursuing Gender Equity in STEM in Higher Education across the World

Description: In this chapter, the authors offer suggestions for how policymakers and Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) educators may apply unique but potentially transferrable strategies. Finally, the authors suggest directions for innovative research and policy for pursuing gender equity in STEM fields after the economic and educational turmoil caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.
Date: July 12, 2021
Creator: Ro, Hyun; Ramon, Elizabeth J. & Fernandez, Frank
Partner: UNT College of Education
open access

STEM Bachelor's Degree Attainment among Women of Color in the United States: Using Geographic Analysis for Gender and Racial Equity Research

Description: This chapter showcases a study that examines the relationship between STEM bachelor’s degree attainment, particularly focusing on women of color, and the opportunities of higher education and STEM higher education within local communities across the United States. The authors analyze two large-scale national data sets, the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) and the American Community Survey (ACS), to conduct a location-level analysis. The authors then offer implications that target women of color who live in places that lack opportunities in higher education.
Date: July 12, 2021
Creator: Ro, Hyun; Meng, Yi & Zhu, Qiong
Partner: UNT College of Education
open access

Atomic Resolution Imaging with a sub-50 pm Electron Probe

Description: Using a highly coherent focused electron probe in a 5th order aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope, we report on resolving a crystal spacing less than 50 pm. Based on the geometrical source size and residual coherent and incoherent axial lens aberrations, an electron probe is calculated, which is theoretically capable of resolving an ideal 47 pm spacing with 29percent contrast. Our experimental data show the 47 pm spacing of a Ge 114 crystal imaged with 11-18percent contrast at a 60-95percent confidence level, providing the first direct evidence for sub 50-pm resolution in ADF STEM imaging.
Date: March 2, 2009
Creator: Erni, Rolf P.; Rossell, Marta D.; Kisielowski, Christian & Dahmen, Ulrich
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

A molecular link between stem cell regulation and floral patterning in Arabidopsis.

Description: OAK-B135 The homeotic gene AGAMOUS (AG) has dual roles in specifying floral organ fate and limiting stem cell proliferation in Arabidopsis flowers. We show here that the floral identity protein LEAFY (LFY), a transcription factor expressed throughout the flower, acts together with the homeodomain protein WUSCHEL (WUS) to activate AG in the center of flowers. WUS was previously identified because of its role in maintaining a stem cell population in the center of both shoot and floral meristems. The unsuspected additional role of WUS in regulating floral homeotic gene expression supports the hypothesis that floral patterning makes use of a general meristem patterning system that was present before flowers evolved. We also show that AG represses WUS at later stages of floral development, thus creating a negative feedback loop that is required for the determinate growth of floral meristems.
Date: June 15, 2001
Creator: Lohmann, J. U., Hong, R. L., Hobe, M., Busch, M. A., Parcy, F., Simon, R., and Weigel, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Effect of the Resistance Exercise-Induced Hormonal Changes on Satellite Cell Myogenic State

Description: Skeletal muscle satellite cells are important for muscle repairing and muscle mass growth. For a successful muscle regenerative process, satellite cells have to sequentially undergoing different stages of myogenic process, i.e. proliferative state and differentiation state. To support this process, the presence of different circulating factors, such as immune cells, cytokines, and hormones, at the appropriate time course is critical. Among these factors, hormones, such as testosterone, cortisol, and IGF-1, have shown to play an important role in satellite cell proliferation and differentiation. Studies investigated the effect of testosterone on satellite cell using a supraphysiological dose in human or in cell culture demonstrated that testosterone is critical in satellite cell myogenic process. Due to the anabolic effect of testosterone on muscle, studies had been focused on the physiological means to increase the circulating testosterone concentration in the body to maximize the muscle mass growth from resistance exercise. The acute and transient increase in testosterone has shown to be beneficial to muscle mass growth and strength gain; however, this change in physiological testosterone concentration on satellite cell myogenesis is not known. Therefore the purpose of this dissertation is to first determine the effect of acute change in exercise-induced hormones on satellite cell myogenic state, then to determine if testosterone promotes satellite cell proliferation.
Access: Restricted to UNT Community Members. Login required if off-campus.
Date: May 2018
Creator: Luk, Hui Ying
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

Optimization of In Vitro Mammalian Blastocyst Development: Assessment of Culture Conditions, Ovarian Stimulation and Experimental Micro-Manipulation

Description: Factors currently at the forefront of human in vitro fertilization (IVF) that collectively influence treatment success in the form of blastocysts development were investigated during early mammalian embryology with concentration on infertile patients presenting with diminished ovarian reserve or preliminary ovarian failure. A novel experimental technique, Graft Transplant-Embryonic Stem Cells (GT-ESC) was introduced in the mouse model, as the first inclusive approach for embryo selection in IVF treatments resulting in successful graft integration of sibling cells, stage-dependent (day 4) blastocysts. E-Cadherin-catenin bonds play an integral role in trophectoderm cell viability and calcium removal, inducing disruption of cell-to-cell bonds at the blastocyst stage was detrimental to continued blastocyst development. One of the leading methods for embryo selection for uterine transfer in human IVF is application of pre-implantation genetic screening (PGS) methods such as next generation sequencing (NGS). Female patients <35 y do not benefit from this treatment when outcome is measured by presence of fetal heart beats at 10 weeks of gestation. Patients 35-37 y benefit from PGS with no significant difference of outcome based on form of PGS method utilized. Therefore, small nucleotide polymorphism array (snp-array) or targeted-NGS should be selected for this age range to lessen the financial burden of the patient. Embryos from women >40 y have a higher rate of mosaic cell lines which can be detected by NGS. Therefore NGS is most beneficial for women >40 y. Additionally, ovarian stimulation of the patient during human IVF can notably influence outcome. Anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) is a more conducive indicator of blastocysts development per treatment compared to basal follicle stimulating hormone (FSH). Actionable variables included in a decision tree analysis determined a negative influence (0% success, n=11) of high dose gonadotropin use (>3325 IUs) in good prognosis patients (>12 mature follicles at trigger, AMH >3.15 ng/mL). A positive …
Date: May 2018
Creator: Sadruddin, Sheela
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

Personalities and Pipelines: Exploring the Role of Personality in Student Self-selection Into Stem Majors

Description: Despite all the national efforts to increase STEM enrollment in the United States, the gap between the U.S. and other developed countries in terms of STEM graduates has widened over the last 20 years. Researchers have studied factors such as gender, race, high school GPA, and the student’s socioeconomic status for their impact on STEM enrollment. This study offers another possible explanation of why students might choose, or not choose, to enroll in STEM majors by examining the relationship between personality and STEM enrollment. the sample included 2,745 respondents to the 2008 Cooperative Institutional Research Program freshman survey at a large research university in the southwestern United States. Factor analysis was used to create four personality scales, based on John Holland’s theory of personality types, with items selected from the survey. Logistic regression was utilized to answer three research questions: Are students classified as a strong investigative personality type more likely to enroll in STEM majors than students classified as a weak investigative personality type? Are there differences in their likelihood to enroll in STEM majors among students of investigative-social, investigative-artistic, and investigative-enterprising personality types? What effect does personality have on students’ self-selection into a biological versus a physical STEM major? Results suggested that students with a combined investigative and social personality were more likely to enroll in STEM majors whereas students with a combined investigative and artistic personality were less likely to do so. Additionally, STEM students with an enterprising personality were more likely to choose a biological STEM major than a physical STEM major. These results should benefit educators and policy makers who seek to strengthen the pipeline into STEM fields.
Date: May 2012
Creator: Simpson, Patricia
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

Design and Performance Characteristics of the ORNL AdvancedMicroscopy Laboratory and JEOL 2200FS-AC Aberration-CorrectedSTEM/TEM

Description: At ORNL, the new Advanced Microscopy Laboratory (AML) has recently been completed, with two aberration-corrected instruments installed, and two more planned in the near future to fill the 4-laboratory building. The installed JEOL 2200FS-AC has demonstrated aTEM information limit of 0.9A. This limit is expected given the measured instrument parameters (HT and OL power supply stabilities, beam energy spread, etc.), and illustrates that the environmental influences are not adversely affecting the instrument performance. In STEM high-angle annular dark-field (HA-ADF) mode, images of a thin Si crystal in&lt;110&gt;zone axis orientation, after primary aberrations in the illuminating beam were optimally corrected, showed a significant vibration effect. The microscope is fitted with three magnetically levitated turbo pumps (one on the column at about the specimen position,and two near floor level) that pump the Omega energy filter and detector chamber. These pumps run at 48,000 rpm, precisely equivalent to 800Hz. It was determined that the upper turbo pump was contributing essentially all of the 800Hz signal to the image, and in fact that the pump was defective. After replacing the pump with one significantly quieter than the original, the Si atomic column image and associated diffractogram(Fig. 4b) show a much-reduced effect of the 800Hz signal, but still some residual effect from the turbo pump. The upper pump will be removed from the main column to an adjacent frame on the floor, and will have a large-diameter, well-damped, pump line to the original connection to the column to effectively isolate the pump from the column. If the 800Hz signal results from mechanical vibrations, they will be damped, and if the signal results from acoustic coupling to the column, it can be damped by appropriate acoustic materials.
Date: February 15, 2005
Creator: Allard, Lawrence F.; Blom, Douglas A.; O'Keefe, Michael A. & Mishina, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Recommended Library Contributions to STEM Retention Based on an LIS Interpretation of the Landmark Study, Talking about Leaving: Why Students Leave the Sciences

Description: Poster presentation for the American Library Association (ALA) Annual Conference, Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) Science and Technology Section Program Poster Session. This poster discusses recommended library contributions to Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) retention based on a Library and Information Science (LIS) interpretation of a landmark study.
Date: June 19, 2014
Creator: O'Toole, Erin
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

Investigating the Relationship Between Internet Attitudes of College Students and Their Stem (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) Career Perceptions

Description: Are our students just consumers of technology or do their interests in technology translate into positive perceptions about STEM majors and careers? This research aimed to describe the role of the Internet in undergraduate students’ academic and career perceptions in STEM areas. The purpose of the research was addressed in three parts. First, the attitudes of undergraduate students towards five functions of the Internet namely tool, toy, treasure, telephone and territory were described. Second, students’ STEM career-related perceptions were described in terms of their science and mathematics self-efficacy, outcome expectations, and attitudes towards a STEM career. Third, the relationship between the five Internet functions and the three STEM career-related perceptions was examined. The participants for this study were 566 undergraduate students from a large Southern university. The research design followed a mixed methods approach using multivariate analyses and content analyses. The findings of the research indicated that there was a small but meaningful relationship between undergraduate students’ Internet and STEM perceptions. In their daily lives, the students perceived the Internet more as a toy and a tool. For general career related purposes, they perceived the Internet more as a treasure and a tool. For STEM areas in particular, they perceived the treasure and toy dimensions of the Internet more relevant. Findings on the differences in students’ Internet and STEM career-related perceptions based on gender, major and enrollment in an Honors program are also discussed.
Date: August 2013
Creator: Periathiruvadi, Sita
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

Identification of a Potential Factor Affecting Graduation Rates in STEM for Hispanic Students at the University of North Texas, via Analysis of Nonfiction Science Books in Spanish Language for ELLs in the Dallas ISD Schools

Description: Latinos are the largest minority group in the U.S.; however despite the continuous growth of the Hispanic population, Latinos are severely underrepresented in STEM fields. One of the reasons that might explain why Latinos do not major in STEM is the way they encounter science curriculum in primary school. Students' limited proficiency in English may constrain their science achievement when instruction is delivered exclusively in English. A quantitative analysis with graduation rates in STEM from 2009 to 2014 at the University of North Texas was conducted, finding that there is a significant difference (p<0.05) in the number of bachelor's degrees in STEM between Hispanic, White, African American and other student populations. Interviews with teachers, librarians and publishing companies were performed to describe the limited science literature in Spanish at the Dallas ISD schools. Improving science literacy by teaching according to ELLs' linguistic skills and culture may lead to a better understanding of science curriculum throughout their education, which may translate into higher college graduation rates by Hispanic recipients in STEM.
Date: August 2016
Creator: Garcia Colin, Monica
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

Contrasting Perceptions of STEM Content and Careers

Description: This article presents a second year analysis of baseline attitudinal data gathered from a National Science Foundation Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers project concerning contrasts between the perceptions of practicing professionals and students toward science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines and careers.
Date: 2011
Creator: Knezek, Gerald; Christensen, Rhonda & Tyler-Wood, Tandra L.
Partner: UNT College of Information
Back to Top of Screen