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Evaluation of Alternative Filter Media for the Rotary Microfilter

Description: The Savannah River Site is currently developing and testing several processes to treat high level radioactive liquid waste. Each of these processes has a solid-liquid separation process that limits its throughput. Savannah River National Laboratory researchers identified and tested the rotary microfilter as a technology to increase solid-liquid separation throughput. The authors believe the rotary microfilter throughput can be improved by using a better filter membrane. Previous testing showed that asymmetric filters composed of a ceramic membrane on top of a stainless steel support produced higher filter flux than 100% stainless steel symmetric filters in crossflow filter tests. Savannah River National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are working together to develop asymmetric ceramic ? stainless steel composite filters and asymmetric 100% stainless steel filters to improve the throughput of the rotary microfilter. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Inorganic Membrane Group fabricated samples of alternative filter membranes. In addition, Savannah River National Laboratory obtained samples of filter membranes from Pall, Porvair, and SpinTek. They tested these samples in a static test cell with feed slurries containing monosodium titanate and simulated sludge.
Date: November 9, 2011
Creator: Poirier, M. R.; Herman, D. T. & Bhave, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Pilot-Scale Testing of a Spin Tek Rotary Microfilter With Welded Disks and Simulated Savannah River Site High Level Waste

Description: The Department of Energy is developing processes to treat Savannah River Site (SRS) radioactive waste. In the first step, personnel contact the incoming salt solution that contains entrained sludge with monosodium titanate (MST) to adsorb strontium and select actinides. They filter the resulting slurry to remove the sludge and MST. The filtrate receives further treatment to remove cesium. Previously, personnel conducted a review of solid-liquid separation technologies and identified the rotary microfilter as a plausible improvement over the tubular crossflow filter in the current baseline. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) received funding from the DOE to continue developing the rotary microfilter for SRS high level waste applications. As part of this task, the authors developed a protocol to weld stainless steel and ceramic filter disks. After they welded the disks, they placed them in the pilot-scale rotary microfilter and tested them with simulated SRS waste. The conclusions are: the rotary microfilter has now operated for over 2400 hours with no significant operational problems; filter flux with the welded disks was significantly less than the flux in comparable tests with filter disks fabricated using epoxy; the ceramic filter media produced the highest flux; the Pall filter media produced higher flux than the Mott filter media; MST-only feed filtered at a higher rate than sludge plus MST feed; the Lasaentec(R) data provide insight into the settling behavior of the sludge and MST particles; when agitation resumed, the settled particles re-suspended within a few minutes; the MST-only solids settled more rapidly than the sludge plus MST solids; particle size measurements showed a 25 - 50 percent median particle size reduction during the tests; the median particle size was as much as 35 percent smaller than in previous tests.
Date: May 21, 2004
Creator: POIRIER, MICHAEL
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A Membrane Process for Recycling Die Lube from Wastewater Solutions

Description: An active-surface membrane technology was used to separate a die lube manufacturing wastewater stream consisting of various oils, hydrocarbons, heavy metals, and silicones. The ultrafiltration membranes reduced organics from initial oil and grease contents by 20–25X, carbon oxygen demand (COD) by 1.5 to 2X, and total organic carbon (TOC) by 0.6, while the biological oxygen demand (BOD) remained constant. The active-surface membranes were not fouled as badly as non-active-surface systems and the active-surface membrane flux levels were consistently higher and more stable than those of the non-active-surface membranes tested. Field testing demonstrated that the rotary microfilter can concentrate the die lube, i.e. remove the glycerin component, and produce a die lube suitable for recycling. The recycling system operated for six weeks with only seven cleaning cycles and no mechanical or electrical failures. Test data and quality records indicate that the die casting scrap was reduced from 8.4 to 7.8%. There is no doubt that this test yielded tremendous results. This separation process presents significant opportunities that can be evaluated further.
Date: April 1, 2003
Creator: Peterson, Eric S.; Trudeau, Jessica; Cleary, Bill; Hackett, Michael & Greene, William A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A Membrane Process for Recycling Die Lube from Wastewater Solutions

Description: An active-surface membrane technology was used to separate a die lube manufacturing wastewater stream consisting of various oils, hydrocarbons, heavy metals, and silicones. The ultrafiltration membranes reduced organics from initial oil and grease contents by 20�25X, carbon oxygen demand (COD) by 1.5 to 2X, and total organic carbon (TOC) by 0.6, while the biological oxygen demand (BOD) remained constant. The active-surface membranes were not fouled as badly as non-active-surface systems and the active-surface membrane flux levels were consistently higher and more stable than those of the non-active-surface membranes tested. Field testing demonstrated that the rotary microfilter can concentrate the die lube, i.e. remove the glycerin component, and produce a die lube suitable for recycling. The recycling system operated for six weeks with only seven cleaning cycles and no mechanical or electrical failures. Test data and quality records indicate that the die casting scrap was reduced from 8.4 to 7.8%. There is no doubt that this test yielded tremendous results. This separation process presents significant opportunities that can be evaluated further.
Date: April 30, 2003
Creator: Peterson, E.S.; Trudeau, J.; Cleary, B.; Hackett, M. & Greene, W.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department