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Hydrogeologic Features of the Alluvial Deposits in the Greybull River Valley, Bighorn Basin, Wyoming

Description: Abstract: The alluvial aquifer along the Greybull River consists principally of the Greybull terrace deposits and the flood-plain alluvium but also includes the Burlington terrace deposits and the flood-plain alluvium but also includes the Burlington terrace deposits east of Burlington, the McKinnie terrace, and the younger, generally undissected alluvial-fan deposits. Well-log data and 18 surface-resistivity measurements at four localities indicate that the thickness of the alluvial aquifer is as much as 60 feet thick only near Burlington and Otto. The most favorable area for development of ground water from the alluvial aquifer is near Burlington and Otto where relatively large amounts of water can be obtained from the Greybull terrace deposits and the flood-plain alluvium. Elsewhere, the deposits of the alluvial aquifer yield only small amounts of water to wells.
Date: 1979
Creator: Cooley, Maurice E. & Head, William J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Preliminary study of favorability for uranium resources in Juab County, Utah

Description: The best potential for large, low-grade uranium deposits in Juab County is in the hydrothermally altered vitric tuffs of Pliocene age. The lateral extent of the altered tuffs may be determined by subsurface studies around the perimeter of the volcanic centers in the Thomas Range and the Honeycomb Hills. Because the ring-fracture zone associated with collapse of the Thomas caldera was a major control for hydrothermal uranium deposits, delineation of the northern and eastern positions of the ring-fracture zone is critical in defining favorable areas for uranium deposits. A small, medium-grade ore deposit in tuffaceous sand of Pliocene age at the Yellow Chief mine in Dugway Dell is unique in origin, and the probability of discovering another deposit of this type is low. A deposit of this type may be present under alluvial cover in the northwestern Drum Mountains along the southern extension of the ring-fracture zone of the Thomas caldera. Festoonlike iron oxide structures and uranium deposition within permeable sandstone horizons indicate that the Yellow Chief deposit was formed by recent ground-water circulation. Granitic intrusive rocks in the Deep Creek Range and in Desert Mountain contain isolated epigenetic vein-type deposits. These rocks could be a source of arkosic sediments buried in adjacent valleys. The Pleistocene lacustrine sediments and playa lake brines may contain concentrations of uranium leached from uranium-rich rocks.
Date: February 1, 1978
Creator: Leedom, S.H. & Mitchell, T.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Results of acid treatments in hydrothermal direct heat experiment wells

Description: Matrix acid treatments have been employed in two low-to-moderate temperature hydrothermal wells with successful results. These two wells showed flow rate increases of 40% and 50%. The increased flow reduced the payback periods for the heating systems to nearly one-half of what they were before acidization. It is recommended that well designs in certain areas consider accommodating such acid stimulation techniques, if testing suggests they are warranted as a well completion tool.
Date: January 1, 1980
Creator: Strawn, J.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation of a marketing program designed to increase consumer consideration of energy-efficient products in Denver, Colorado

Description: A demonstration marketing program to sensitize Denver homeowners to incorporate the energy cost of ownership orientation in their decision process regarding purchase of energy-efficient products is described. Personal interviews with Denver homeowners were conducted. A first survey established a baseline for consumer awareness and acceptance of energy conservation and conservation-related products and provided information which could be utilized in developing marketing strategies related to energy conservation and the concept of energy cost of ownership. A second survey measured shifts in awareness and attitudes which might have occurred as a result of the marketing demonstration program. The methodology and results of the evaluation are discussed in detail. The Denver Test Market Media Campaign conducted through multi-media advertising and public relations campaigns to sensitize the residents to the positive consideraton of energy-efficient products is described. (MCW)
Date: August 1, 1978
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Gravity survey of the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale KGRA and the North Mineral Mountains area, Millard and Beaver Counties, Utah. Technical report: Volume 77-4

Description: During the summers of 1975 and 1976, a gravity survey was conducted in the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale KGRA and north Mineral Mountains area, Millard and Beaver Counties, Utah. The survey consisted of 671 gravity stations covering an area of about 1300 km/sup 2/, and included two orthogonal gravity profiles traversing the area. The gravity data are presented as a terrain-corrected Bouguer gravity anomaly map with a contour interval of 1 mgal and as an isometric three-dimensional gravity anomaly surface. Selected anomaly separation techniques were applied to the hand-digitized gravity data (at 1-km intervals on the Universal Transverse Mercator grid) in both the frequency and space domains, including Fourier decomposition, second vertical derivative, strike-filter, and polynomial fitting analysis, respectively.
Date: August 1, 1977
Creator: Brumbaugh, W.D. & Cook, K.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Gravity survey of the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale KGRA and the north Mineral Mountains area, Millard and Beaver Counties, Utah

Description: During the summers of 1975 and 1976, a gravity survey was conducted in the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale KGRA and north Mineral Mountains area, Millard and Beaver Counties, Utah. The survey consisted of 671 gravity stations covering an area of about 1300 km{sup 2}, and included two orthogonal gravity profiles traversing the area. The gravity data are presented as a terrain-corrected Bouguer gravity anomaly map with a contour interval of 1 mgal and as an isometric three-dimensional gravity anomaly surface. Selected anomaly separation techniques were applied to the hand-digitized gravity data (at 1-km intervals on the Universal Transverse Mercator grid) in both the frequency and space domains, including Fourier decomposition, second vertical derivative, strike-filter, and polynomial fitting analysis, respectively.
Date: August 1, 1977
Creator: Brumbaugh, W.D. & Cook, K.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Gravity survey of the southwestern part of the sourthern Utah geothermal belt

Description: A gravity survey covering an area of 6200 km/sup 2/ was made over the southwestern part of the southern Utah geothermal belt. The objective of the gravity survey is to delineate the geologic structures and assist in the understanding of the geothermal potential of the area. A total of 726 new gravity stations together with 205 existing gravity stations, are reduced to give: (1) a complete Bouguer gravity anomaly map, and (2) a fourth-order residual gravity anomaly map; both maps have a 2-mgal contour interval. The complete Bouguer gravity anomaly map shows an east-trending regional gravity belt with a total relief of about 70 mgal which crosses the central portion of the survey area. The gravity belt is attributed to a crustal lateral density variation of 0.1 gm/cc from a depth of 5 to 15 km.
Date: March 1, 1981
Creator: Green, R.T. & Cook, K.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Determination of the optimum massive hydraulic fracturing design for the stimulation of the Wasatch and Mesa Verde formations. Annual report

Description: The MHF project in the Natural Buttes Unit, Bitter Creek Field, Utah has progressed through five of the eight phases of the scheduled program. The last three phases of the program are in progress. Two of the three remaining phases should be finished by 10-1-78, with the testing of CIGE 21-15-10-22 to continue until approximately 1-1-79. Results from this project indicate that MHF stimulations of low permeability sands such as the Mesa Verde--Wasatch are economically high risk. The technology necessary to perform an MHF is adequate; however, the results anticipated must be carefully evaluated with respect to economics.
Date: July 1, 1978
Creator: Merrill, R.G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Hydrogeochemical and stream sediment detailed geochemical survey for Edgemont, South Dakota; Wyoming

Description: Results of the Edgemont detailed geochemical survey are reported. Field and laboratory data are presented for 109 groundwater and 419 stream sediment samples. Statistical and areal distributions of uranium and possible uranium-related variables are given. A generalized geologic map of the survey area is provided, and pertinent geologic factors which may be of significance in evaluating the potential for uranium mineralization are briefly discussed. Groundwaters containing greater than or equal to 7.35 ppB uranium are present in scattered clusters throughout the area sampled. Most of these groundwaters are from wells drilled where the Inyan Kara Group is exposed at the surface. The exceptions are a group of samples in the northwestern part of the area sampled and south of the Dewey Terrace. These groundwaters are also produced from the Inyan Kara Group where it is overlain by the Graneros Group and alluvium. The high uranium groundwaters along and to the south of the terrace are characterized by high molybdenum, uranium/specific conductance, and uranium/sulfate values. Many of the groundwaters sampled along the outcrop of the Inyan Kara Group are near uranium mines. Groundwaters have high amounts of uranium and molybdenum. Samples taken downdip are sulfide waters with low values of uranium and high values of arsenic, molybdenum, selenium, and vanadium. Stream sediments containing greater than or equal to 5.50 ppM soluble uranium are concentrated in basins draining the Graneros and Inyan Kara Groups. These values are associated with high values for arsenic, selenium, and vanadium in samples from both groups. Anomalous values for these elements in the Graneros Group may be caused by bentonite beds contained in the rock units. As shown on the geochemical distribution plot, high uranium values that are located in the Inyan Kara Group are almost exclusively draining open-pit uranium mines.
Date: May 31, 1980
Creator: Butz, T.R.; Dean, N.E.; Bard, C.S.; Helgerson, R.N.; Grimes, J.G. & Pritz, P.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Colorado geothermal commercialization planning. Semi-annual progress report, January 1, 1979-June 30, 1979

Description: The potential for developing the geothermal resources of Colorado is detailed. Constraints that are limiting geothermal energy development are described. Area development plans, an institutional analysis, and the outreach program are presented. (MHR)
Date: January 1, 1979
Creator: Coe, B.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Solar Energy Meteorological Research and Training Site: Region 5. Annual report, 30 September 1977-29 September 1978

Description: The primary facility which is to be a benchmark site for the acquisition of research quality solar radiation and solar energy related meteorological data has been set up and will be fully operational in the near future. The training program has been established with the introduction of two, two-quarter courses on solar radiation and meteorological measurements and on atmospheric radiative processes. Also, as part of the training program, a week-long workshop on solar energy measurement and instrumentation was conducted during the summer of '78 and a series of seminars on solar energy related topics, catering to both professionals and non-professionals, was arranged during the 1977-78 academic year. A meeting of solar radiation scientists from the five states of the region was held in Corvallis (August '78) to explore the feasibility of setting up a regional network of stations to acquire research quality solar radiation and meteorological data. Useful global irradiance measurements have been made at the five sites, making up the general quality network in Oregon, over the greater part of the year.
Date: January 1, 1979
Creator: Rao, C.R.N. & Hewson, E.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Geothermal ground noise measurements at Roosevelt Hot Springs and Cove Fort, Utah. Final report

Description: The present study was basically aimed at determining the type of noise found around a geothermal reservoir. Six element arrays were used to determine the structure of the noise field and the types of waves present. Arrays were used at both the Roosevelt Hot Springs and Cove Fort areas. The arrays consisted of six seismometers, one in the center and the others evenly spaced on a circle. The interelement array spacing varied from 50 m to 300 m depending on the experiment. The instrumentation and the arrays are discussed in some detail. The theory required to gain an understanding of the results is briefly discussed. (MHR)
Date: September 1, 1978
Creator: Laster, S.J. & Douze, E.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Initial investigation of soil mercury geochemistry as an aid to drill site selection in geothermal systems

Description: A mercury-in-soil survey was conducted at the Roosevelt Hot Springs Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA), Utah, to evaluate mercury soil geochemistry as a method of selecting exploration well sites in a hot-water geothermal system. Samples of -80 mesh soil were collected at 30.5 m intervals along traverses crossing known structures, surficial geothermal alteration, and exploration well sites, and were analyzed using a Gold Film Mercury Detector. Strong mercury anomalies occur at locations along known structures in close proximity to subsurface thermal activity; examples include areas over hot spring deposits and near a shallow producing well. In contrast, background mercury concentrations are present in nearby locations with little or no indication of subsurface thermal activity, such as areas around deep marginal producing wells and dry wells, and areas lacking hot spring deposits. These results indicate that mercury geochemical surveys can be useful for identifying and mapping structures controlling fluid flow in geothermal systems and for delineating areas overlying near-surface thermal activity. Soil mercury geochemistry thus provides information which may aid in the cost-effective selection of exploratory well sites.
Date: December 1, 1978
Creator: Capuano, R. M. & Bamford, R. W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Numerical modeling and interpretation of dipole-dipole resistivity and IP profiles Cove Fort-Sulphurdale KGRA, Utah

Description: The Cove Fort-Sulphurdale Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA) is located near the junction of the Pavant Range and the Tushar Mountains in south-central Utah. The area has been the site of an intensive geothermal exploration effort since 1975. The electrical resistivity data obtained by Union Oil Company and a subsequent survey conducted for the Earth Science Laboratory and a detailed numerical interpretation of both data sets are presented. The detailed modeling permits a characterization of the intrinsic electrical resistivity to depths exceeding 2000 feet. An area of over two square miles with bulk in-situ resistivities of four-to-five ohm-m is delineated at Sulphurdale near the Union Oil Co. well CFSU No. 42-7. The low-resistivities rocks define the area of extensive hydrothermal alteration in response to the presence of clay minerals and conductive thermal fluids. In contrast the area north and east of Cove Fort is typified by high (100-300 ohm-m) resistivities to depths exceeding 2000 feet. This is an area of Cretaceous and Paleozoic sedimentary rocks where two attempts to drill to reservoir depth failed because of extreme drilling problems. The high resistivities are not considered encouraging for the presence of a deeper reservoir. The electrical resistivity interpretation has defined several areas of probable upward migration of thermal fluids along north-trending normal faults. Some of these areas may have potential for direct heat geothermal utilization.
Date: December 1, 1979
Creator: Ross, H. P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Concept of a (1-. cap alpha. ) performance confidence interval

Description: A multi-input, single-output system is assumed to be represented by some model. The distribution functions of the input and the output variables are considered to be at least obtainable through experimental data. Associated with the computer response of the model corresponding to given inputs, a conditional pseudoresponse set is generated. This response can be constructed by means of the model by using the simulated pseudorandom input variates from a neighborhood defined by a preassigned probability allowance. A pair of such pseudoresponse values can then be computed by a procedure corresponding to a (1-..cap alpha..) probability for the conditional pseudoresponse set. The range defined by such a pair is called a (1-..cap alpha..) performance confidence interval with respect to the model. The application of this concept can allow comparison of the merit of two models describing the same system, or it can detect a system change when the current response is out of the performance interval with respect to the previously identified model. 6 figures.
Date: January 1, 1980
Creator: Leong, H.H.; Johnson, G.R. & Bechtel, T.N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Bipole-dipole survey at Roosevelt Hot Springs, Thermal Area, Beaver County, Utah

Description: A bipole-dipole electrical resistivity survey at Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area, Beaver County, Utah was undertaken to evaluate the technique in a well-studied Basin and Range geothermal prospect. The major electrical characteristics of the area are clearly revealed but are not particularly descriptive of the geothermal system. More subtle variations of electrical resistivity accompanying the geothermal activity are detectable, although the influence of near-surface lateral resistivity variations imposes upon the survey design the necessity of a high station density. A useful practical step is to conduct a survey using transmitter locations and orientations which minimize the response of known features such as the resistivity boundary due to a range front fault. Survey results illustrate the effects of transmitter orientation and placement, and of subtle lateral resistivity variations. A known near-surface conductive zone is detected while no evidence is found for a deep conductive region.
Date: September 1, 1980
Creator: Frangos, W. & Ward, S.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Uinta Arch Project: investigations of uranium potential in Precambrian X and older metasedimentary rocks in the Unita and Wasatch ranges, Utah and Colorado

Description: This study is part of the United States Department of Energy's National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program to understand the geologic setting, amount, and availability of uranium resources within the boundaries of the United States. The systematic study of Precambrian quartz-pebble conglomerates and areas that may contain such conglomerates is an integral part of DOE's resource evaluation program, because deposits of world-wide importance occur in such terrains in Canada and South Africa, and because terrains similar to those producing uranium from quartz-pebble conglomerates exist elsewhere in the United States. Because of the ready availability of Tertiary sandstone and Colorado Plateau-type uranium deposits, large areas of Precambrian rocks in the US have not been fully assessed for uranium potential. Thus, the Uinta Arch Project was undertaken to assess the favorability of Precambrian metasedimentary rocks in northern Utah for deposits of uranium in Precambrian quartz-pebble conglomerates. Rocks of interest to this study are the thick, clastic sequences within the Uinta Arch that are considered to be of Early Proterozoic age. The Uinta Arch area is known to contain rocks which generally fit the lithologic characteristics that are understood to limit the occurrence of Precambrian fossil placers. However, detailed geology of these rocks and their exact fit to the model described for uraniferous conglomerates was not known. The primary goal of the Uinta Arch Project was to determine how well these Precambrian rocks resemble known deposits and to describe the favorability of placer uranium deposits.
Date: June 1, 1980
Creator: Graff, P.J.; Sears, J.W. & Holden, G.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Rock Springs Site 12 hydraulic/explosive true in situ oil shale fracturing experiment

Description: The experiment plan involved the creation and characterization of three horizontal hydraulic fractures, followed by the insertion and simultaneous detonation of slurry explosive in the two lower fractures. Core analyses, wellbore logging, and airflow and /sup 85/Kr tracer tests were used for site characterization and assessment of the hydraulic and explosive fracturing. Tiltmeters, wellhead pressure and flow gages, and in-formation pressure, flow and crack-opening sensors were used to monitor hydrofracture creation and explosive insertion. Explosive detonation diagnostic data were taken with stress and time-of-arrival gages and surface and in-formation accelerometers. The post-fracturing assessments indicated that: (1) hydrofracture creation and explosive insertion and detonation were accomplished essentially as planned; (2) induced fractures were randomly distributed through the shale with no extensively fractured regions or dislocation of shale; and (3) enhancement of permeability was limited to enlargement of the explosive-filled fractures.
Date: June 1, 1980
Creator: Parrish, R.L.; Boade, R.R.; Stevens, A.L.; Long, A. Jr. & Turner, T.F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department