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The Foote Creek and Dutton Creek Formations, Two New Formations in the North Part of the Laramie Basin, Wyoming

Description: A report about two new geologic formations in Wyoming. The Foote Creek Formation consists of beds of fine-grained sandstone with shale, siltstone, and coal beds. The Dutton Creek Formation consists of beds of coarse-grained locally conglomeratic sandstone.
Date: 1965
Creator: Hyden, Harold J. & McAndrews, Harry
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Rock bed heat accumulators. Final report

Description: The principal objectives of the research program on rock bed heat accumulators (or RBHA) are: (1) to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of storing large amounts of thermal energy (in the tens of MWt range) at high temperature (up to 500/sup 0/C) over extended periods of time (up to 6 months) using native earth or rock materials; (2) to conduct studies to establish the performance characteristics of large rock bed heat accumulators at various power and temperature levels compatible with thermal conversion systems; and (3) to assess the materials and environmental problems associated with the operation of such large heat accumulators. Results of the study indicate that rock bed heat accumulators for seasonal storage are both technically and economically feasible, and hence could be exploited in various applications in which storage plays an essential role such as solar power and total energy systems, district and cogeneration heating systems.
Date: December 1, 1977
Creator: Riaz, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Cooling concept integration. Phase I final technical report, October 1, 1979-July 31, 1981. [For pre-engineered metal buildings]

Description: Before specific test prototypes were developed, six potential evaporative roof cooling configurations with alternative storage and heat transfer mechanisms were examined, and preliminary cost estimates were made. Each system uses a wet roof system which sprays or floods the roof, allowing evaporative heat transfer to the environment. Finite difference thermal network methods were used for the evaluation of the systems. Detailed results including charts of the hourly heat flows during particular days are presented, and the performance is summarized for Las Vegas. (LEW)
Date: August 19, 1981
Creator: Fraker, H.; Glennie, W. & Snyder, M.K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Yucca Mountain Project thermal and mechanical codes first benchmark exercise: Part 3, Jointed rock mass analysis; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

Description: Thermal and mechanical models for intact and jointed rock mass behavior are being developed, verified, and validated at Sandia National Laboratories for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. Benchmarking is an essential part of this effort and is one of the tools used to demonstrate verification of engineering software used to solve thermomechanical problems. This report presents the results of the third (and final) phase of the first thermomechanical benchmark exercise. In the first phase of this exercise, nonlinear heat conduction code were used to solve the thermal portion of the benchmark problem. The results from the thermal analysis were then used as input to the second and third phases of the exercise, which consisted of solving the structural portion of the benchmark problem. In the second phase of the exercise, a linear elastic rock mass model was used. In the third phase of the exercise, two different nonlinear jointed rock mass models were used to solve the thermostructural problem. Both models, the Sandia compliant joint model and the RE/SPEC joint empirical model, explicitly incorporate the effect of the joints on the response of the continuum. Three different structural codes, JAC, SANCHO, and SPECTROM-31, were used with the above models in the third phase of the study. Each model was implemented in two different codes so that direct comparisons of results from each model could be made. The results submitted by the participants showed that the finite element solutions using each model were in reasonable agreement. Some consistent differences between the solutions using the two different models were noted but are not considered important to verification of the codes. 9 refs., 18 figs., 8 tabs.
Date: October 1, 1991
Creator: Costin, L.S. & Bauer, S.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Installation package for a solar heating system

Description: Installation information is presented for a solar heating system installed in Concho Indian School at El Reno, Oklahoma. This package includes a system Operation and Maintenance Manual, hardware brochures, schematics, system operating modes and drawings. The Solar Engineering and Equipment Company (SEECO) developed this prototype solar heating system consisting of the following subsystems: solar collectors, control and storage.
Date: December 1, 1978
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Solar heating system final design package

Description: Contemporary Systems has taken its Series V Solar Heating System and developed it to a degree acceptable by local codes and regulatory agencies. The system is composed of the Series V warm air collector, the LCU-110 logic control unit and the USU-A universal switching and transport unit. The collector was originally conceived and designed as an integrated roof/wall system and provides a dual function in the structure. The collector serves both as a solar energy conversion system and as a structural weather resistant skin. The collector can be fabricated in any length from 12 to 24 feet. This provides maximum flexibility in design and installation. The LCU-110 control unit provides totally automatic control over the operation of the system. It receives input data from sensor probes in collectors, storage and living space. The logic is designed so as to make maximum use of solar energy and minimize use of conventional energy. The USU-A transport and switching unit is a high-efficiency air-handling system equipped with gear motor valves that respond to outputs from the control system. The fan unit is designed for maximum durability and efficiency in operation, and has permanently lubricated ball bearings and excellent air-handling efficiency.
Date: May 1, 1979
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A coastal hazards data base for the US East Coast

Description: This document describes the contents of a digital data base that may be used by raster or vector geographic information systems (GIS) and non-GIS data bases to assess the risk of coastlines to erosion or sea level rise. The data base integrates point, line, and polygon data for the US East Coast into 0.250 latitude [times] 0.250 longitude grid cells. Each coastal grid cell contains data on geology, geomorpholog,elevation, wave heights, tidal ranges, shoreline displacement (erosion), and sea-level trends. These data are available as a Numeric Data Package (NDP), from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, consisting of this document and a set of computerized data files. The documentation contains information on the methods used in calculating each variable, detailed descriptions of file contents and formats, and a discussion of the sources, restrictions, and limitations of the data. The data files are available on magnetic tape, on floppy diskettes, or through INTERNET.
Date: August 1, 1992
Creator: Gornitz, V.M. (National Aeronautics and Space Administration, New York, NY (United States). Goddard Inst. for Space Studies); White, T.W. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)) & Daniels, R.C. (Energy, Environment and Resources Center, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States))
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Conceptual design of advanced central receiver power systems sodium-cooled receiver concept. Volume 4. Commercial and pilot plant cost data. Final report

Description: This volume of the advanced central receiver final report presents the cost data using the cost breakdown structure identified in the preliminary specification. Cost summaries are presented in the following sections for the 100-MWe and 281-MWe commercial plant and a 10-MWe pilot plant. Cost substantiation data for this volume are presented in the appendices. Other cost summary data include Nth plant data for the 100-MWe and 281-MWe commercial plants, and a summary for the alternative concept air-rock storage system. The main description of the plant costing technique occurs as part of Section II for the 100-MWe baseline concept.
Date: March 1, 1979
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Solar-heated commercial-greenhouse demonstration. Final performance report

Description: Poly Solar Company was formed to design and fabricate a demonstration of a solar heating system for commercial greenhouses in moderate climates. This system is built of readily available materials, and can be constructed using conventional techniques available to most builders and farmers. Construction began on the demonstration project in August 1981 and the system was placed into operation that winter. Energy savings were calculated by monitoring the running time on an oil furnace in a duplicate greenhouse with the same crop as the solar heated greenhouse with an oil backup furnace. The first monitoring period was before the Christmas season with poinsettias used as the comparison crop with 60/sup 0/ to 64/sup 0/F. During this period the 126 ton mass storage and waste heat recovery sections of the system were used. These trials showed energy savings over the 100% oil heated structure to be 23.4%. After the crops were removed from the greenhouse trials were ran which showed this portion of the system could maintain night time temperatures as high as 56/sup 0/F with no other heat source and an outside temperature of 26/sup 0/F. The 1860 sq ft solar collector/storage system was monitored with a winter-spring crop of geraniums at a night time temperature of 60/sup 0/ to 64/sup 0/F. In April 1982 a severe storm with wind gusts in excess of 50 mph destroyed a section of duct that feeds heated air from the collector to the rock storage bed and caused light damage to the collector itself.
Date: unknown
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

NCSU solar energy and conservation house. Final report

Description: A passive solar energy house has been built adjacent to the NCSU McKimmon Continuing Education Center. The house contains a two-story embedded sunspace, two Trombe walls, active solar hot water heating, thermal storage in a rock filled ceiling/floor, and numerous research treatments, and energy conservation features. (See attached photo brochure; Appendix 1). The house is completely decorated and furnished in an attractive manner and the exterior architecture is traditional and has broad consumer appeal. It is also thoroughly instrumented to monitor performance. The house is open to the public on weekends and numerous people come to visit on their own initiative and others take advantage of the close proximity to McKimmon while there attending conferences. The house will influence and motivate large numbers of people to consider solar and energy conservation facets in their homes and will provide data to substantiate performance to prospective home buyers and meaningful data on design and construction for builders.
Date: October 1, 1981
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Research on the application of solar energy to industrial drying or dehydration processes. Fourth phase. Final report

Description: The operation and maintenance of this proof-of-concept solar dehydration facility in Fresno, California is reported. Phase I of this project incorporated the analysis and design of an inexpensive solar collector unit, coupled with a commercial heat recovery unit and rock storage facilities. These three components supplied about 85% of the hot air required by a single tunnel of the Lamanuzzi and Pantaleo (L and P) dehydration facility in Fresno, California. A relatively simple air solar collector and heat storage system, was used. This facility was built during Phase II. The system is comprised of 22,000 square feet of single glazed air solar collectors, 700 tons of rock storage, and a heat recovery wheel, and is controlled by a microcomputer control system. The facility was monitored and evaluated over the first drying season of 133 days in Fresno, California. In the last Phase, the glazings on the solar collectors were replaced. That is, one-third of the field was replaced with glass, another one-third of the field with Filon, and one-third of the field with Lexan. Also, a new microcomputer control system was designed, tested, and installed using readily available parts and based upon the Apple II microcomputer system.
Date: December 1, 1981
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Developing and upgrading of solar system thermal energy storage simulation models. Technical progress report, September 1, 1978-February 28, 1979

Description: The purpose of this project is to select and upgrade solar energy storage models, incorporate these models into a computer simulation, validate the model with comparisons to measured data, and make these models available for use by engineering and architectural organizations. Progress is reported. The rock bed model selected for validation was further explored and compared to test data. Correlation with data from different experiments is showing improvement over the correlations reported in the last six month progress report. The present model is considered acceptable at this time but more confirmation of its accuracy would be desirable. Two more water tank models have been obtained, one from the University of Alabama and one from Colorada State University (CSU). Work has continued with model testing, validation and evaluation. Additional laboratory test data on water tank performance has been obtained. Some significant improvements have been made in the SOLSYS algorithm resulting in a more powerful simulation tool referred to as the Extended SOLSYS Model. That and the CSU model have been selected for streamlining and for incorporation into TRNSYS. (WHK)
Date: May 1, 1979
Creator: Kuhn, J.K.; von Fuchs, G.F. & Zob, A.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Heat pipe dynamics. Final report, April 30, 1981. [Uses of heat pipe, especially in solar collector]

Description: A heat-pipe flat plate solar collector is constructed like a typical flat plate collector with the exception that individual heat pipes are attached to the collector surface to transfer collected heat via a phase change from collector surface into an attached jacket containing a phase change material. The efficiency of such a collector was measured roughly. Also briefly described are: a heat-pipe heat exchanger, heat-pipe heat exchanger freeze proofing, heat-pipe attic ventilation, transfer of light bulb heat via a heat pipe to heat water, heat recovery via heat pipe, cooling of oil in engines and transmissions via heat pipe, a tracking reflector, automatic sun tracker, single-stroke vacuum pump for heat-pipe manufacture, and heat pipe heat transfer from rock bed. (LEW)
Date: January 1, 1981
Creator: Norman, R.M. Sr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Low cost solar collector of a packed bed design

Description: Two solar collectors using a pebble bed design were constructed and tested using air as the heat exchange media. One collector had pebbles of metallurgical grade coke, and the other had a frothy volcanic material called scoria. The highly irregular surface of such vesicular material should increase the path distance for the air and the surface exposed cavities should give some honeycomb effect. Both should yield greater efficiency. Actual testing shows the efficiencies to be comparable with other air collectors. Thus the advantages of the pebble bed lie in the availability of the bed material, its thermal and radiation stability, and its shielding of underlying collector materials from ultraviolet radiation. Several pebble bed collectors using water as the heat exchange media were constructed. However, basic problems prevented effective testing, and it is concluded that pebble bed collectors using water are impractical.
Date: July 29, 1977
Creator: Simpson, D.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Installation package for the solaron solar subsystems

Description: This package contains information that is intended to be a guide for installation, operation, and maintenance of the various Solaron Solar Subsystems. The subsystems consist of the following: collectors, storage, transport (air handler) and controller for heat pump and off-peak storage. Two prototype residential systems have been installed at Akron, Ohio, and Duffield, Virginia.
Date: April 1, 1979
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Performance evaluation of a solar air-heating and nocturnal cooling system in CSU Solar House II. Final report, June 1, 1977-September 30, 1978

Description: The solar heating system in Solar House II consists of 67.1 m/sup 2/ of double-glazed air-heating collectors with flat-black absorbers, 10.3 m/sup 3/ of pebble bed storage, air-to-water heat exchanger for preheating domestic water and one blower to circulate the air through the system. The nocturnal cooling system consists of an evaporative cooler and utilizes the pebble bed for cool storage. A schematic diagram of the system is shown.
Date: April 1, 1979
Creator: Karaki, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Rock bed storage with heat pump. Final report

Description: The study, Rock Bed Storage with Heat Pump, established the feasibility of mating a heat pump to a rock bed storage to effect optimal performance at the lowest cost in single family residences. The operating characteristics of off-the-shelf components of heat pump/rock bed storage systems were studied, and the results were used to formulate configurations of representative systems. These systems were modeled and subsequently analyzed using the TRNSYS computer program and a life cycle cost analysis program called LCCA. A detailed load model of a baseline house was formulated as part of the TRNSYS analysis. Results of the analysis involved the development of a technique to confine the range of heat pump/rock bed storage systems to those systems which are economical for a specific location and set of economic conditions. Additionally, the results included a comparison of the detailed load model with simple UA models such as the ASHRAE bin method. Several modifications and additions were made to the TRNSYS and LCCA computer programs during the course of the study.
Date: May 1, 1979
Creator: Remmers, H.E. & Mills, G.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water. Quarterly reports, November 1976--June 1977

Description: This report covers the progress made in the development, delivery and support of two prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water. The system consists of the following subsystems: collector, auxiliary heating, potable hot water, storage, control, transport, and government-furnished site data acquisition.
Date: December 1, 1978
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Air thermosiphon solar heating system: the Jones house, Santa Fe, New Mexico

Description: A hybrid passive/active solar heating system, featuring a passive air thermosiphon loop, is described. Heated air is supplied to a rock storage bin, coupled with blower-driven air distribution to the house. The house, of 246 m/sup 2/ (2650 ft/sup 2/) heated area and located in Santa Fe, New Mexico, also includes a greenhouse located under the planar collector array. Architectural features and construction details of the house, the solar collector, storage, and distribution system are presented. Representative results of three months of monitoring by the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory of collector, rock bin, and greenhouse temperatures, as well as outside ambient temperature and insolation, are reported and discussed. Data recorded hourly since the system was placed in operation in early February 1978, show temperatures in the rock bin in excess of 71/sup 0/C (160/sup 0/F) and in the collector absorber mesh in excess of 93/sup 0/C (200/sup 0/F). Delivery temperatures from the charged bin, without auxiliary boost, range from 38 to 54/sup 0/C (100 to 130/sup 0/F).
Date: January 1, 1978
Creator: Hunn, B.D. & Jones, M.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

SIMS Prototype System 4: performance test report

Description: The results obtained during testing of a self-contained, preassembled air type solar system, designed for installation remote from the dwelling, to provide space heating and hot water are presented. Data analysis is included which documents the system performance and verifies the suitability of SIMS Prototype System 4 for field installation.
Date: October 9, 1978
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

SIMS prototype system 1: design data brochure

Description: A prototype solar heating and hot water system is described using air as the collector fluid and a pebble bed for heat storage. The system was designed for installation into a single family dwelling. Described are the system, subsystem, and installation requirements. System operation and performance are discussed, and a procedure for sizing the system to a specific site is presented.
Date: January 1, 1978
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

System design package for SIMS Prototype System 4, solar heating and domestic hot water

Description: This report is a collation of documents and drawings that describe a prototype solar heating and hot water system using air type solar energy collection techniques. The system consists of a modular designed prepackaged solar unit containing solar collctors, a rock storage container, blowers, dampers, ducting, air-to-water heat exchanger, DHW preheat tank, piping and system controls. The system was designed to be installed adjacent to a small single family dwelling. The description, performance specification, subsystem drawings, verification plan/procedure, and hazard analysis of the system are packaged for evaluation of the system with inforation sufficient to assemble a similar system. The prepackage solar unit has been installed at the Mississippi Power and Light Company, Training Facilities, Clinton, Mississippi.
Date: November 1, 1978
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department