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Fiscal Year 2012 Revegetation Assessment

Description: This report summarizes the Fiscal Year 2012 Revegetation Assessment by Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC. This assessment was conducted to supplement documentation related to the Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan for Construction Activities and to ensure that disturbed vegetation and soil at various locations are being restored. This report provides the following information for each site being monitored by the Idaho National Laboratory Environmental Support and Services: • Summary of each site • Assessment of vegetation status and site stabilization at each location • Actions and Resolutions for each site. Ten disturbed sites were evaluated for this assessment. Six have achieved final stabilization. The remaining four sites not meeting the criteria for final stabilization will be evaluated again in the next fiscal year.
Date: November 1, 2012
Creator: Nordstrom, Jenifer
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fiscal Year 2009 Revegetation Assessment

Description: This report summarizes the Fiscal Year 2009 Revegetation Assessment by Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC. This assessment was conducted to supplement documentation related to the Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan for Construction Activities and to ensure that disturbed vegetation and soil at various locations are being restored. This report provides the following information for each site being monitored by the Idaho National Laboratory Environmental Support and Services: • Summary of each site • Assessment of vegetation status and site stabilization at each location • Recommendation(s) for each site.
Date: October 1, 2009
Creator: Lewis, Michael
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fiscal Year 2013 Revegetation Assessment

Description: This report summarizes the Fiscal Year 2013 Revegetation Assessment by Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC. This assessment was conducted to supplement documentation related to the Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan for Construction Activities and to ensure that disturbed vegetation and soil at various locations are being restored. This report provides the following information for each site being monitored by the Idaho National Laboratory Environmental Support and Services: Summary of each site Assessment of vegetation status and site stabilization at each location Actions and Resolutions for each site. Six disturbed sites were evaluated for this assessment. One has achieved final stabilization. The remaining five sites not meeting the criteria for final stabilization will be evaluated again in the next fiscal year.
Date: November 1, 2013
Creator: Nordstrom, Jenifer
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Regrassing for Soil Protection in the Southwest

Description: "This bulletin is designed to help the stockmen and farmers, of the Southwest [United States] particularly, in reestablishing depleted ranges where unfavorable climatic conditions and heavy demands on the range have served to make improvement of the range by natural means a slow and difficult process. It discusses the latest methods of artificial revegetation that have proved most effective in regrassing the ranges. It also discusses the more promising grasses and indicates that areas to which they are adapted. It explains the latest methods for harvesting seed and establishing grass on various sites under a wide range of conditions as to elevation, temperature, rainfall, and soils." -- p. i
Date: 1942
Creator: Flory, Evan L. & Marshall, Charles G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fiscal Year 2010 Revegetation Assessment

Description: This report summarizes the Fiscal Year 2010 Revegetation Assessment by Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC. This assessment was conducted to supplement documentation related to the Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan for Construction Activities and to ensure that disturbed vegetation and soil at various locations are being restored. This report provides the following information for each site being monitored by the Idaho National Laboratory Environmental Support and Services: • Summary of each site • Assessment of vegetation status and site stabilization at each location • Recommendation(s) for each site.
Date: November 1, 2010
Creator: Nordstrom, Jenifer & Lewis, Mike
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

2010 River Corridor Closure Contractor Revegetation and Mitigation Monitoring Report

Description: This report documents eh status of revegetation projects and natural resources mitigation efforts conducted for remediated waste sites and other activities associated with CERLA cleanup of National Priorities List waste sites at Hanford. This report contains vegetation monitoring data that were collected in the spring and summer of 2010 from the River Corridor Closure Contract’s revegetation and mitigation areas on the Hanford Site.
Date: September 30, 2010
Creator: Lindsey, C. T. & Johnson, A. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Native and Adapted Grasses for Conservation of Soil and Moisture in the Great Plains and Western States

Description: "The information given in this bulletin should enable farmers in the Great Plains and Western States to select from the more common species of grasses some one or more suited to their needs [for soil and water conservation]. Common harvesting equipment and farm machinery can be adapted to the proper handling of native grasses. This brings the cost of such work within the means of most farmers." -- p. i. Among the grasses discussed are wheatgrass, buffalo grass, bluestem, grama, Bermuda grass, wild rye, hilaria, Sudan grass, bluegrass, panic grasses, dropseed, and needlegrass.
Date: 1939
Creator: Hoover, Max M. (Max Manley), 1895-
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Testing a passive revegetation approach for restoring Coastal Plain depression wetlands

Description: Abstract Restoration of coastal plain depressions, a biologically significant and threatened wetland type of the southeastern United States, has received little systematic research. Within the context of an experimental project designed to evaluate several restoration approaches, we tested whether successful revegetation can be achieved by passive methods (recruitment from seed banks or seed dispersal) that allow for wetland ‘‘self-design’’ in response to hydrologic recovery. For 16 forested depressions that historically had been drained and altered, drainage ditches were plugged to reestablish natural ponding regimes, and the successional forest was harvested to open the sites and promote establishment of emergent wetland vegetation. We sampled seed bank and vegetation composition 1 year before restoration and monitored vegetation response for 3 years after. Following forest removal and ditch plugging, the restored wetlands quickly developed a dense cover of herbaceous plant species, of which roughly half were wetland species. Seed banks were a major source of wetland species for early revegetation. However, hydrologic recovery was slowed by a prolonged drought, which allowed nonwetland plant species to establish from seed banks and dispersal or to regrow after site harvest. Some nonwetland species were later suppressed by ponded conditions in the third year, but resprouting woody plants persisted and could alter the future trajectory of revegetation. Some characteristic wetland species were largely absent in the restored sites, indicating that passive methods may not fully replicate the composition of reference systems. Passive revegetation was partially successful, but regional droughts present inherent challenges to restoring depressional wetlands whose hydrologic regimes are strongly controlled by rainfall variability.
Date: September 1, 2006
Creator: De Steven, Diane; Sharitz, Rebecca R.; Singer, Julian H. & Barton, Christopher D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Soil Stabilization and Revegetation at the INEEL: Recommendations for Improvement - August 16, 2002

Description: Soil stabilization for the INEEL Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP) has mostly been by revegetation, but has experienced only limited success. The purpose of this report is to discuss issues associated with revegetation failures and to explore possible remedies.
Date: March 1, 2003
Creator: Blew, Roger D.; Jackson, Michael R. & Forman, Amy D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Feasibility Study of Carbon Sequestration Through Reforestation in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed of Virginia

Description: The Chesapeake Rivers conservation area encompasses approximately 2,000 square miles of agricultural and forest lands in four Virginia watersheds that drain to the Chesapeake Bay. Consulting a time series of classified Landsat imagery for the Chesapeake Rivers conservation area, the project team developed a GIS-based protocol for identifying agricultural lands that could be reforested, specifically agricultural lands that had been without forest since 1990. Subsequent filters were applied to the initial candidate reforestation sites, including individual sites > 100 acres and sites falling within TNC priority conservation areas. The same data were also used to produce an analysis of baseline changes in forest cover within the study period. The Nature Conservancy and the Virginia Department of Forestry identified three reforestation/management models: (1) hardwood planting to establish old-growth forest, (2) loblolly pine planting to establish working forest buffer with hardwood planting to establish an old-growth core, and (3) loblolly pine planting to establish a working forest. To assess the relative carbon sequestration potential of these different strategies, an accounting of carbon and total project costs was completed for each model. Reforestation/management models produced from 151 to 171 tons carbon dioxide equivalent per acre over 100 years, with present value costs of from $2.61 to $13.28 per ton carbon dioxide equivalent. The outcome of the financial analysis was especially sensitive to the land acquisition/conservation easement cost, which represented the most significant, and also most highly variable, single cost involved. The reforestation/management models explored all require a substantial upfront investment prior to the generation of carbon benefits. Specifically, high land values represent a significant barrier to reforestation projects in the study area, and it is precisely these economic constraints that demonstrate the economic additionality of any carbon benefits produced via reforestation--these are outcomes over and above what is currently possible given existing market ...
Date: March 1, 2007
Creator: Lacatell, Andy; Shoch, David; Stanley, Bill & Kant, Zoe
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Third Annual Report: 2006 Pre-Construction Eelgrass Monitoring and Propagation for King County Outfall Mitigation

Description: King County proposes to build a new sewer outfall discharging to Puget Sound near Point Wells, Washington. Construction is scheduled for 2008. The Point Wells site was selected to minimize effects on the nearshore marine environment, but unavoidable impacts to eelgrass (Zostera marina) beds are anticipated during construction. To mitigate for these impacts and prepare for post-construction restoration, King County began implementation of a multi-year eelgrass monitoring and restoration program in 2004, with the primary goal of returning intertidal and shallow subtidal habitat and eelgrass to pre-construction conditions. Major program elements are a) pre-construction monitoring, i.e., documenting initial eelgrass conditions and degree of fluctuation over 5 years prior to construction, b) eelgrass transplanting, including harvesting, offsite propagating and stockpiling of local plantstock, and post-construction planting, and c) post-construction monitoring. The program is detailed in the Eelgrass Restoration and Biological Resources Implementation Workplan (King County 2006). This report describes calendar year 2006 pre-construction activities conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in support of King County. Activities included continued propagation of eelgrass shoots and monitoring of the experimental harvest plots in the marine outfall corridor area to evaluate recovery rates relative to harvest rates. Approximately 1500 additional shoots were harvested from the marine outfall corridor in August 2006 to supplement the plants in the propagation tank at the PNNL Marine Sciences Laboratory in Sequim, Washington, bringing the total number of shoots to 4732. Eelgrass densities were monitored in the five experimental harvest plots established in the marine outfall corridor. Changes in eelgrass density were evaluated in year-to-year comparisons with initial harvest rates. Net eelgrass density decreased from 2004 post-harvest to 2006 in all plots, despite density increases observed in 2005 in some plots and at some harvest rates. Eelgrass densities within individual subplots were highly variable from year to year, and ...
Date: February 1, 2007
Creator: Woodruff, Dana L.; Southard, Susan S.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Kohn, Nancy P.; Anderson, Michael G. & Vavrinec, John
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

POST-FIRE REVEGETATION AT HANFORD

Description: Range fires on the Hanford Site can have a long lasting effect on native plant communities. Wind erosion following removal of protective vegetation from fragile soils compound the damaging effect of fires. Dust storms caused by erosion create health and safety hazards to personnel, and damage facilities and equipment. The Integrated Biological Control Program (IBC) revegetates burned areas to control erosion and consequent dust. Use of native, perennial vegetation in revegetation moves the resulting plant community away from fire-prone annual weeds, and toward the native shrub-steppe that is much less likely to burn in the future. Over the past 10 years, IBC has revegetated major fire areas with good success. IBC staff is monitoring the success of these efforts, and using lessons learned to improve future efforts.
Date: January 5, 2010
Creator: Roos, R. C.; Johnson, A. R.; Caudill, J. G.; Rodriguez, J. M. & Wilde, J. W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Soil Stabilization and Revegetation at the INEEL Recommendations for Improvement

Description: Soil stabilization for the INEEL Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP) has mostly been by revegetation, but has experienced only limited success. The purpose of this report is to discuss issues associated with revegetation failures and to explore possible remedies.
Date: March 24, 2003
Creator: Blew, R.D.; Jackson, M.R. & Forman, A.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Par Pond vegetation status summer 1995 - July survey descriptive summary

Description: A survey of the emergent shoreline aquatic plant, communities began in June 1995, three months after the refilling of Par Pond to approximately 200 feet (61 meters) above mean sea level, and continued with this July survey. Aquatic plant communities, similar to the pre-drawdown Par Pond communities, are becoming reestablished. Beds of maidencane (Panicum hemitomon), lotus (Nelumbo lutea), water lily (Nymphaea odorata), and watershield (Brasenia schreberi) are now extensive and well established. In addition, within isolated coves, extensive beds of water lilies and spike-rush (Eleocharis sp.) are common. Cattail occurrence has increased since refill, but large beds common to Par Pond prior to the drawdown have not formed. Invasion of willow (Salix sp.) and red maple (Acer rubrum) occurred along the lake shoreline during drawdown. The red maples along the present shoreline are beginning to show evidence of stress and mortality from flooding over the past four months. Some of the willows appear to be stressed as well. The loblolly pines (Pinus taeda), which were flooded in all but the shallow shoreline areas, are now dead. Future surveys are planned for the growing seasons of 1995, 1996, and 1997, along with the evaluation of satellite data for mapping the areal extent of the macrophyte beds of Par Pond.
Date: July 1, 1995
Creator: Mackey, H.E. Jr. & Riley, R.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Establishment report: Reforestation of the Pen Branch corridor and delta

Description: This report documents the role of the USDA Forest Service in the reforestation of the Pen Branch floodplain and delta. The report focuses upon the reforestation activities and monitoring to characterize the sites.
Date: December 1, 1995
Creator: Nelson, E.A.; Dulohery, N.J.; Bunton, C.S.; Trettin, C.C. & McKee, W.H. Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Survival of planted tupelo seedlings in F- and H-Area tree-kill zones

Description: Swamp tupelo seedlings were planted in four areas which experienced previous tree mortality at the seeplines of the F- and H-Area Seepage Basins. The sites represented a range in severity of impact and stage of recovery. Seedlings were planted in February of 1994 and followed through the first growing season in the field. Survival on all sites through the first growing season was excellent, with greater than 92% of the seedlings still alive. Most seedlings appeared healthy with few external signs of stress. The performance of the seedlings will be followed in subsequent years to determine the physical state of the soil environment on seedling growth. Hopefully, the results will indicate that artificial reforestation can begin on similarly impacted sites prior to the beginning of natural revegetation of the site.
Date: January 1, 1995
Creator: Nelson, E.A. & Rogers, V.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Removal action work plan for the YS-860 Firing Ranges, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

Description: The US Department of Energy is conducting environmental restoration activities at the Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. As part of these efforts, a removal action is planned for the former YS-860 Firing Ranges as described in the Action Memorandum for the project. This removal action work plan (RmAWP) is focused on the former YS-860 Firing Ranges, located outside the primary fenceline at the eastern end of the plant. This RmAWP defines the technical approach, procedures, and requirements for the removal of lead-contaminated soil and site restoration of the former YS-860 Firing Ranges at the Y-12 Plant. This RmAWP describes excavation, verification/confirmatory sampling, and reporting requirements for the project. Lower tier plans associated with the RmAWP, which are submitted as separate stand-alone documents, include a field sampling and analysis plan, a health and safety plan, a quality assurance project plan, a waste management plan, a data management implementation plan, and a best management practices plan. A site evaluation of the YS-86O Firing Ranges conducted in 1996 by Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., determined that elevated lead levels were present in the Firing Ranges target berm soils. The results of this sampling event form the basis for the removal action recommendation as described in the Action Memorandum for this project. This RmAWP contains a brief history and description of the Former YS-860 Firing Ranges Project, along with the current project schedule and milestones. This RmAWP also provides an overview of the technical requirements of the project, including a summary of the approach for the removal activities. Finally, the RmAWP identifies the regulatory requirements and the appropriate removal action responses to address applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements to achieve the project goals of substantially reducing the risk to human health and the environment.
Date: March 1, 1998
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Effects of seed origin and irrigation on survival and growth of transplanted shrubs

Description: Revegetation is difficult in the Mojave Desert due to limited, erratic precipitation and extreme temperatures. Establishing plant cover by transplanting native shrubs is known to be a promising technique, but many questions still remain regarding its use on a large operational scale. A study was initiated on the US Department of Energy Nevada Test Site (NTS) to determine the effects of seed origin and irrigation on survival and growth of transplanted shrubs. Plants of three species (Larrea tridentata, Ambrosia dumosa, and Atriplex canescens) were grown in a greenhouse and hardened outdoors. Plants of all three species were produced from two seed sources: (1) seed collected from the NTS (Mojave Desert), and (2) commercially available seed collected from outside the NTS. One-year-old containerized plants (180 of each species) were transplanted to a site on the NTS and irrigated with two liters of water at one of the following frequencies: (1) at time of planting only, (2) at time of planting and monthly during the first growing season, and (3) at time of planting and twice monthly during the first growing season. After 16 months, survival of all species was generally greater than 80% and was unaffected by irrigation treatments. Survival of fourwing saltbush was significantly greater from local versus non-local seed. Survival of bursage and creosotebush was generally unaffected by seed origin. Shrub volumes regardless of species or seed origin increased during the first growing season, and then decreased during the second growing season. Shrub volumes for fourwing saltbush were significantly greater for shrubs from local versus non-local seed.
Date: October 1, 1995
Creator: Winkel, V.K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

CARBON SEQUESTRATION SURFACE MINE LANDS

Description: An authorized budget was unavailable during this first 3-month working period of this project. Our ability to use the $100K that DOE had dedicated to the project was frustrated by the internal problem of getting an account number issued to bill our expenses to. This has delayed the initiation of a portion of the tasks to be performed. However, enough has been accomplished to allow the project to meet the first years planting goals. This will also allow the initiation of several start-up activities that could not have been possible without established tree plantations.
Date: May 6, 2003
Creator: Graves, Donald H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

CARBON SEQUESTRATION SURFACE MINE LANDS

Description: Over 160 acres (64.8 ha) of tree seedlings have been planted in eastern and western Kentucky that depict a mixed stand similar to the native vegetation of the area. All these sites have been assessed and various instrumentation is or is planned for installation to monitor environmental conditions and changes on the areas. The environmental conditions include temperature, aspect, slope, rainfall, and other treatment or condition factors.
Date: June 24, 2003
Creator: Graves, Donald H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department