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Avian survey and field guide for Osan Air Base, Korea.

Description: This report summarizes the results of the avian surveys conducted at Osan Air Base (AB). This ongoing survey is conducted to comply with requirements of the Environmental Governing Standards (EGS) for the Republic of Korea, the Integrated Natural Resources Management Plan (INRMP) for Osan AB, and the 51st Fighter Wing's Bird Aircraft Strike Hazard (BASH) Plan. One hundred ten bird species representing 35 families were identified and recorded. Seven species are designated as Natural Monuments, and their protection is accorded by the Korean Ministry of Culture and Tourism. Three species appear on the Korean Association for Conservation of Nature's (KACN's) list of Reserved Wild Species and are protected by the Korean Ministry of Environment. Combined, ten different species are Republic of Korea (ROK)-protected. The primary objective of the avian survey at Osan AB was to determine what species of birds are present on the airfield and their respective habitat requirements during the critical seasons of the year. This requirement is specified in Annex J.14.c of the 51st Fighter BASH Plan 91-212 (51 FW OPLAN 91-212). The second objective was to initiate surveys to determine what bird species are present on Osan AB throughout the year and from the survey results, determine if threatened, endangered, or other Korean-listed bird species are present on Osan AB. This overall census satisfies Criterion 13-3.e of the EGS for Korea. The final objective was to formulate management strategies within Osan AB's operational requirements to protect and enhance habitats of known threatened, endangered, and ROK-protected species in accordance with EGS Criterion 13-3.a that are also favorable for the reproduction of indigenous species in accordance with the EGS Criterion 13-3.h.
Date: December 5, 2006
Creator: Levenson, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Preliminary Report: Results of Computed Tracer Concentrations over Eastern China, South Korea, and Japan for 01 March to 30 May 2007 Daily Simulated Releases from Taiyuan, China

Description: In order to prepare for a proposed long range tracer experiment in China for the spring of 2008 time period, NARAC computed hypothetical PMCH concentrations over Eastern China, South Korea and Japan for simulated releases from Taiyuan, China. Normalized 1 kg of PMCH source strength releases were made twice a day, with wind input from global forecast weather model. We used 6-hour analysis fields valid at the start of each model run, resulting in four wind fields per day. The selected domain encompassed the region of interest over eastern Asia and the Western Pacific. Screening runs were made for each day at 0000 and 1200 UTC from 01 April, 2007 through 29 May, 2007 for a total of 90 days and 180 cases. 24-hour average air concentrations were evaluated at 22 sample cities in the three regions of interest for each case. 15 sample cities were selected to help quantify modeling results for experiment objectives. Any case that resulted in model predicted air concentrations exceeding 2.0E-02 fL/L at a sample city in all three regions was then selected for a detailed model run with source times six hours before and after evaluated in addition to the case time. The detailed runs used the same wind fields and model domain, but 6-hour average air concentrations were generated and analyzed for the 15 sample cities. Each of the 180 cases were ranked subjectively, based on whether or not the model prediction indicated the possibility that a release on that date and time might achieve the long range experiment objectives. Ranks used are High, Good, Low, Poor, and Bad. Of the 180 cases run, NARAC dispersion models predicted 6 instances of High possibility, 8 cases of Good, 32 of Low, 74 of Poor, and 60 cases of Bad probability. Detailed model runs were ...
Date: August 7, 2007
Creator: Vogt, P
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Relationship Between Domestic Savings and Other Economic Indicators in Korea

Description: This study is an analysis of the relationship between domestic savings and three economic indicators in the Republic of Korea during the 1950s through 1980s. While domestic saving is affected by many economic phenomena, the analysis is confined to national income, exports, and inflation. The study is divided into five chapters. These are entitled (1) Introduction, (2) Domestic Savings, (3) Income and Domestic Savings, (4) Exports and Domestic Savings, (5) Inflation and Domestic Savings. In chapter I, Korea and the Korean economy are introduced, and the scope of the study is stated. Chapter II reviews the related realm of domestic savings: definition, kinds, and determinants of domestic savings. Chapter III presents the relationship between different incomes and domestic savings, and shows non-labor income contributes more powerfully to the formation of domestic savings than labor income. Chapter IV contains effects of exports, and hypothesis testing. The effect of exports suggests that export expansion affects domestic savings positively via an increase in gross national product. Chapter V deals with the correlation between inflation and domestic savings, and its testing. The correlation between inflation and domestic savings is not generally clear except for some specific cases.
Date: August 1986
Creator: Kim, Sunghoo
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Educational Policy-Making Process in the Republic of Korea: A Systems Analysis

Description: This study was concerned with examining the process of educational policy-making at the central government level in the Republic of Korea through an application of systems analysis. The purposes of this study were (1) to examine the relationship existing between politics and education; (2) to construct a systems analysis for examining the process of educational policy-making; and (3) to identify problems and limitations in the educational policy-making process in the Republic of Korea. To accomplish these purposes analytic and descriptive methods were used as a research technique.
Date: May 1974
Creator: Kim, Myung Han
Partner: UNT Libraries

Military confidence building on the Korean Peninsula: possible first steps toward cooperation

Description: The Korean Peninsula is one of the world`s most tense military confrontational sites. Nearly 2 million North Korean, South Korean, and U.S. troops face each other along the 255-km long military demarcation line. Confidence building measures (CBMs), particularly military ones, that address the security needs of both countries could decrease the danger of conflict and help create an environment where a peace regime might be negotiated. In spite of the present high level of mutual distrust, steps can still be taken to prepare for future development and implementation of CBMs. This paper defines some simple and specific first steps toward CBMs that might be useful on the Korean Peninsula.
Date: May 1, 1997
Creator: Vannoni, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Avian Field guide and checklist for Kunsan Air Base, Korea.

Description: This report summarizes the results of the avian surveys conducted at Kunsan Air Base (AB). This on-going survey is conducted to comply with requirements of the Environmental Governing Standards (EGS) for the Republic of Korea, the Integrated Natural Resources Management Plan (INRMP) for Kunsan AB, and the 8th Fighter Wing's Bird Aircraft Strike Hazard (BASH) Plan. One hundred sixteen bird species representing 34 families were identified and recorded. Seven species are designated as Cultural Property Monuments, and their protection is accorded by the Korean Ministry of Culture and Tourism. Six species appear on the Korean Association for Conservation of Nature's(KACN's) list of Reserved Wild Species and are protected by the Korean Ministry of Environment. Combined, only ten different species are Republic of Korea (ROK)-protected because the Eurasian Spoonbill, Peregrine Falcon, and Eurasian Oystercatcher are listed by both agencies. The primary objective of the avian survey at Kunsan AB was to determine what species of birds are present on the airfield and their respective habitat requirements during the critical seasons of the year. This requirement is specified in Annex C.4.a.(1-4) of the 8th Fighter Wing BASH Plan(8FWOPLAN 91-202). The second objective was to initiate surveys to determine what bird species are present on Kunsan AB throughout the year, and from the survey results determine if threatened, endangered, or other Korean-listed bird species are present on Kunsan AB. This overall census satisfies Criterion 13-3.e of the EGS for Korea. The final objective was to formulate management strategies within Kunsan AB's operational requirements to protect and enhance habitats of known threatened, endangered, and ROK-protected species in accordance with EGS Criterion 13-3.a and also that are favorable for the reproduction of indigenous species in accordance with the EGS Criterion 13-3.h.
Date: November 15, 2005
Creator: Levenson, J. B. & Assessment, Environmental
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Assessment of public perception of radioactive waste management in Korea.

Description: The essential characteristics of the issue of radioactive waste management can be conceptualized as complex, with a variety of facets and uncertainty. These characteristics tend to cause people to perceive the issue of radioactive waste management as a 'risk'. This study was initiated in response to a desire to understand the perceptions of risk that the Korean public holds towards radioactive waste and the relevant policies and policy-making processes. The study further attempts to identify the factors influencing risk perceptions and the relationships between risk perception and social acceptance.
Date: November 1, 2011
Creator: Trone, Janis R.; Cho, SeongKyung (Myongji University, Korea); Whang, Jooho (Kyung Hee University, Korea) & Lee, Moo Yul
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Trip Report for the 2005 Sino-American SF6 Tracer Experiment

Description: The Chinese Institute for Radiation Protection (CIRP) conducted an SF6 atmospheric tracer experiment in July 2005 in the vicinity of the Qinshan Nuclear Power Company complex on the coast of the East China Sea. The experiment was partially sponsored by the US Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration, under the NA-23 International Emergency Management and Cooperation Program. NA-23 sent a delegation of five scientists to observe the experiment; four of the observers were from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and one was from the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). CIRP's cooperation with the US-Japanese delegation was excellent, and the project was very successful from the international cooperation perspective. Although the experiment was modest in scope, it may provide one or more data sets that can be used for international dispersion model validation and intercomparison projects. Several areas for procedural improvements were noted by the US and Japanese observers, and a more concise measure of the experiment's scientific value will be available after CIRP completes and delivers the database of the experiment results by the end of the fiscal year. The consensus recommendation of the observers is that CIRP and DOE/NNSA NA-23 build on the experience and personal contacts gained during the experiment to plan and conduct an even more effective experiment in the future, perhaps as early as next year (2006). If the decision is made to conduct a follow-on experiment, we strongly recommend that the LLNL and JAERI representatives work cooperatively with CIRP throughout the entire planning phase of the experiment. As discussed in Section V, a 2006 China tracer experiment could serve as a springboard to a 2007 long-range international tracer experiment involving South Korea.
Date: September 7, 2005
Creator: Bradley, M M; Sullivan, T J; Keating II, G A & Leach, M J
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Asian Tracer Experiment and Atmospheric Modeling (TEAM) Project: Draft Field Work Plan for the Asian Long-Range Tracer Experiment

Description: This report provides an experimental plan for a proposed Asian long-range tracer study as part of the international Tracer Experiment and Atmospheric Modeling (TEAM) Project. The TEAM partners are China, Japan, South Korea and the United States. Optimal times of year to conduct the study, meteorological measurements needed, proposed tracer release locations, proposed tracer sampling locations and the proposed durations of tracer releases and subsequent sampling are given. Also given are the activities necessary to prepare for the study and the schedule for completing the preparation activities leading to conducting the actual field operations. This report is intended to provide the TEAM members with the information necessary for planning and conducting the Asian long-range tracer study. The experimental plan is proposed, at this time, to describe the efforts necessary to conduct the Asian long-range tracer study, and the plan will undoubtedly be revised and refined as the planning goes forward over the next year.
Date: August 1, 2007
Creator: Allwine, K Jerry & Flaherty, Julia E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Estimating energy-augmenting technological change in developingcountry industries

Description: Assumptions regarding the magnitude and direction ofenergy-related technological change have long beenrecognized as criticaldeterminants of the outputs and policy conclusions derived fromintegrated assessment models. Particularly in the case of developingcountries, however, empirical analysis of technological change has laggedbehind simulation modeling. This paper presents estimates of sectoralproductivity trends and energy-augmenting technological change forseveral energy-intensive industries in India and South Korea, and, forcomparison, the United States. The key findings are substantialheterogeneity among both industries and countries, and a number of casesof declining energy efficiency. The results are subject to certaintechnical qualifications both in regards to the methodology and to thedirect comparison to integrated assessment parameterizations.Nevertheless, they highlight the importance of closer attention to theempirical basis for common modeling assumptions.
Date: July 7, 2006
Creator: Sanstad, Alan H.; Roy, Joyashree & Sathaye, Jayant A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT INTERNATIONAL PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT FOR 2007

Description: The DOE-EM Office of Engineering and Technology is responsible for implementing EM's international cooperative program. The Office of Engineering and Technology's international efforts are aimed at supporting EM's mission of risk reduction and accelerated cleanup of the environmental legacy of the nation's nuclear weapons program and government-sponsored nuclear energy research. To do this, EM pursues collaborations with government organizations, educational institutions, and private industry to identify and develop technologies that can address the site cleanup needs of DOE. The Office of Engineering and Technology has developed a Technology Roadmap and a Multi-year Program Plan to identify technology needs and identify areas for focused research and development to support DOE-EM's environmental cleanup and waste management objectives. The international cooperative program is an important element of the technology development roadmap, leveraging of world-wide expertise in the advancement and deployment of remediation and treatment technologies. Introductory briefings aimed at furthering familiarity with the DOE-EM mission, and the vital role that technology development plays within it, were presented at two international meetings. The Office of Engineering and Technology currently works with the Khlopin Radium Institute (KRI) and SIA Radon Institute in Russia, the International Radioecology Laboratory (IRL) in Ukraine and the Nuclear Engineering and Technology Institute (NETEC) in South Korea through cooperative bilateral arrangements to support EM's accelerated cleanup and closure mission.
Date: August 26, 2008
Creator: Marra, J
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Country Report on Building Energy Codes in Korea

Description: This report is part of a series of reports on building energy efficiency codes in countries associated with the Asian Pacific Partnership (APP) - Australia, South Korea, Japan, China, India, and the United States of America (U.S.). This reports gives an overview of the development of building energy codes in Korea, including national energy policies related to building energy codes, history of building energy codes, recent national projects and activities to promote building energy codes. The report also provides a review of current building energy codes (such as building envelope, HVAC, and lighting) for commercial buildings in Korea.
Date: April 17, 2009
Creator: Evans, Meredydd; McJeon, Haewon C.; Shui, Bin & Lee, Seung Eon
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Exercises Abroad: How Differing National Experiences are Reflected in Emergency Response Planning and Exercises

Description: Recently a member of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Consequence Management Response Team took part in outreaches and an exercise in different foreign countries. In Brazil and South Korea, the outreaches revolved around a nuclear power plant exercise. In Canada, participation was limited to a table top Consequence Management exercise. This talk will briefly discuss each event and resulting pertinent observations. In each case, it became evident that governments respond to disasters very differently, and that these differences are not only culturally based, but also influenced by each government’s respective experience in dealing with natural disasters.
Date: April 30, 2007
Creator: Marianno, Craig
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Hazardous waste management in the Pacific basin

Description: Hazardous waste control activities in Asia and the Pacific have been reviewed. The review includes China (mainland, Hong Kong, and Taiwan), Indonesia, Korea, Malaysia, Papua New Guinea, the Philippines, Singapore, and Thailand. It covers the sources of hazardous waste, the government structure for dealing with hazardous waste, and current hazardous waste control activities in each country. In addition, the hazardous waste program activities of US government agencies, US private-sector organizations, and international organizations are reviewed. The objective of these reviews is to provide a comprehensive picture of the current hazardous waste problems and the waste management approaches being used to address them so that new program activities can be designed more efficiently.
Date: November 1994
Creator: Cirillo, R. R.; Chiu, S.; Chun, K. C.; Conzelmann, G.; Carpenter, R. A. & Indriyanto, S. H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Asian Energy Security

Description: OAK-B135 In the Asian Energy Security (AES) Project, Nautilus Institute works together with a network of collaborating groups from the countries of Northeast Asia to evaluate the energy security implications of different national and regional energy ''paths''. The goal of the Asia Energy Security project is to illuminate energy paths--and the energy policy choices that might help to bring them about--that result in a higher degree of energy security for the region and for the world as a whole, that is, to identify energy paths that are ''robust'' in meeting many different energy security and development objectives, while also offering flexibility in the face of uncertainty. In work to date, Nautilus has carefully assembled a network of colleagues from the countries of the region, trained them together as a group in the use of a common, flexible, and transparent energy and environmental analysis planning software tool (LEAP, the Long-range Energy Alternatives Planning system), and worked with them to prepare base-year energy sector models for each country. To date, complete data sets and models for ''Business as Usual'' (BAU) energy paths have been compiled for China, Japan, the Republic of Korea, and the Democratic Peoples' Republic of Korea. A partial data set and BAU path has been compiled for the Russian Far East, and a data set is being started in Mongolia, where a team of researchers has just joined the AES project. In several countries, ''Alternative'' energy paths have been developed as well, or partially elaborated. National energy sector developments, progress on national LEAP modeling, additional LEAP training, and planning for the next phase of the AES project were the topics of a recent (early November) workshop held in Vancouver, British Columbia. With funding from the Department of Energy, Nautilus is poised to build upon the successes of the project ...
Date: December 1, 2003
Creator: Peter Hayes, PhD
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Confidence building on the Korean Peninsula: A conceptual development for the cooperative monitoring of limited-force deployment zones

Description: Confidence building measures (CBMs), particularly military ones, that address the security needs of North and South Korea could decrease the risk of conflict on the Korean Peninsula and help create an environment in which to negotiate a peace regime. The Korea Institute for Defense Analyses (KIDA) and the Cooperative Monitoring Center (CMC) of Sandia National Laboratories collaborated to identify potential CBMs and define associated monitoring. The project is a conceptual analysis of political and technical options for confidence building that might be feasible in Korea at some future time. KIDA first analyzed current security conditions and options for CBMs. Their conclusions are presented as a hypothetical agreement to strengthen the Armistice Agreement by establishing Limited Force Deployment Zones along the Military Demarcation Line. The goal of the hypothetical agreement is to increase mutual security and build confidence. The CMC then used KIDA`s scenario to develop a strategy for cooperative monitoring the agreement. Cooperative monitoring is the collecting, analyzing and sharing of agreed information among parties to an agreement and typically relies on the use of commercially available technology. A cooperative monitoring regime must be consistent with the agreement`s terms; the geographic, logistic, military, and political factors in the Korean setting; and the capabilities of monitoring technologies. This report describes the security situation on the Korean peninsula, relevant precedents from other regions, the hypothetical agreement for reducing military tensions, a monitoring strategy for the hypothetical Korean agreement, examples of implementation, and a description of applicable monitoring technologies and procedures.
Date: April 1, 1997
Creator: Vannoni, M.; Duggan, R.; Nam, M.K.; Moon, K.K. & Kim, M.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The application of cooperative monitoring techniques to a conceptual limited deployment zone in the Korean peninsula

Description: The Korean peninsula is the site of a tense military confrontation. Relations between North and South Korea improved during the early 1990`s but the process is now frozen. Confidence building measures, particularly military ones, that address the security needs of both countries would decrease the danger of conflict and help create an environment for direct negotiations. The Korean Institute for Defense Analysis (KIDA) analyzed current security conditions and options. Their scenario includes a conceptual agreement to establish Limited Force Deployment Zones (LDZ) along the current demilitarized zone (DMZ) to increase mutual security. The Cooperative Monitoring Center (CMC) of Sandia National Laboratories, in collaboration with KIDA, developed a strategy, with examples, for cooperatively monitoring the agreement. A cooperative monitoring regime requires consideration of the agreement`s terms, the geographic, logistic, military, and political factors of the Korean environment, and the capability of technology to monitor the terms. This paper assesses the applicability of cooperative monitoring to Korea, describes the monitoring strategy for the Korean enhanced DMZ scenario, and describes the applicable technologies and procedures.
Date: October 1, 1996
Creator: Vannoni, M. & Duggan, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Status of the TRIGA shipments to the INEEL from Asia

Description: This paper will report on preparations being made for returning Training, Research, Isotope, General Atomics (TRIGA) foreign research reactor (FRR) spent fuel from South Korea and Indonesia to the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The roles of US Department of Energy, INEEL, and NAC International in implementing a safe shipment are provided. Special preparations necessitated by making a shipment through a west coast port of the US to the INEEL will be explained. The institutional planning and actions needed to meet the unique political and operational environment for making a shipment from Asia to INEEL will be discussed. Facility preparation at both the INEEL and the FRRs is discussed. Cask analysis needed to properly characterize the various TRIGA configurations, compositions, and enrichments is discussed. Shipping preparations will include an explanation of the integrated team of spent fuel transportation specialists, and shipping resources needed to retrieve the fuel from foreign research reactor sites and deliver it to the INEEL.
Date: October 9, 1997
Creator: Tyacke, M.; George, W.; Petrasek, A.; Stump, R.C. & Patterson, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Analysis of industrial pollution prevention programs in selected Asian countries

Description: Industrialization in developing countries is causing increasing environmental damage. Pollution prevention (P2) is an emerging environmental concept that could help developing countries achieve leapfrog goals, bypassing old and pollutive technologies and minimizing traditional control practices. The current P2 promotion activities in Hong Kong, the Republic of Korea, the Philippines, Singapore, Taiwan, and Thailand are discussed. These programs, generally initiated in the last 5 years, are classified into five categories: awareness promotion, education and training, information transfer, technical assistance, and financial incentives. All important at the early stages of P2 promotion, these programs should inform industries of the benefits of P2 and help them identify applicable P2 measures. Participation in these programs is voluntary. The limited data indicate that adoption of P2 measures in these countries is not yet widespread. Recommendations for expanding P2 promotion activities include (1) strengthening the design and enforcement of environmental regulations; (2) providing P2 training and education to government workers, nongovernmental organizations and labor unions officials, university faculties, and news media; (3) tracking the progress of P2 programs; (4) implementing selected P2 mandatory measures; (5) identifying cleaner production technologies for use in new facilities; (6) implementing special programs for small and medium enterprises; and (7) expanding P2 promotion to other sectors, such as agriculture and transportation, and encouraging green design and green consumerism.
Date: May 1, 1995
Creator: Chiu, S.Y.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department