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Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils (Phase I) Remedial Action Report

Description: This Remedial Action Report summarizes activities undertaken to remediate the Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils, Phase I sites at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Laboratory Site. The 10 sites addressed in this report were defined in the Operable Unit 3-13 Record of Decision and subsequent implementing documents. This report concludes that remediation requirements and cleanup goals established for these 10 sites have been accomplished and are hereafter considered No Action or No Further Action sites.
Date: July 31, 2007
Creator: Davison, L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

New Pump and Treat Facility Remedial Action Work Plan For Test Area North Final Groundwater Remediation, Operable Unit 1-07B

Description: This remedial action work plan identifies the approach and requirements for implementing the medial zone remedial action for Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-07B, at the Idaho National Laboratory. This plan details the management approach for the construction and operation of the New Pump and Treat Facility (NPTF). As identified in the remediatial design/remedial action scope of work, a separate remedial design/remedial action work plan will be prepared for each remedial component of the Operable Unit 1-07B remedial action.
Date: June 12, 2007
Creator: Nelson, L. O.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Operable Unit 3-13, Group 7, SFE-20 Hot Waste Tank System Remedial Action Request

Description: This Remedial Action Report summarizes activities undertaken to remediate the Operable Unit 3-13, Group 7, SFE-20 Hot Waste Tank System at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Laboratory Site. The site addressed in this report was defined in the Operable Unit 3-13 Record of Decision and subsequent implementing documents. This report concludes that remediation requirements and cleanup goals established for the site have been accomplished and is hereafter considered a No Further Action site.
Date: June 30, 2009
Creator: Davison, L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Deployment Support Leading to Implementation

Description: The following paragraphs summarize the progress of each research project funded under the WVU Cooperative Agreement during the third quarter of 1997 (July - September 1997). The projects are arranged according to their 1997 WVU task number. WVU Focus Area 1.0: Subsurface Contaminants, Containment and Remediation Task No. 1.1: Project discontinued. Task No. 1.2: Development of Standard Test Protocols and Barrier Design Models for Desiccation Barriers (K. Amininan & S. Ameri): A number of experiments were preformed this period to evaluate the ability of the dried sand-packs to act as a barrier to liquids. Water infiltration tests were done with a constant head, dispersing 80 ml of water, and by adding water in small increments. Results indicate that when the water is spilled over the sand-pack, it has the tendency to channel through the sand-pack, significantly reducing the capacity of the dried zone to retain liquid contaminants. This appears to be largely influenced by particle size. As the particle size is reduced, the capillary forces spread the water and prevent/delay channels from forming. The measured permeability values were in agreement with those measured with air. The water retention capacity and capillary rise were largely influenced by time and showed no sensitivity to channeling. The water retention capacity tests suggest the sand-packs can retain more water than the expected. Two sets of water infiltration and drying experiments were designed to evaluate the CAB�s ability to prevent spills from spreading. Ten ml of water was injected every 20 minutes and 80 ml of water was added at one time. When injected slowly, results showed the drying process to be similar to the original drying process. The second set indicted the drying process follows a slowly declining drying with no break through. Results also suggested that air flow through the sand-pack can remove ...
Date: October 1, 1997
Creator: Cook, E. E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Modeling of cation binding in hydrated 2:1 clay minerals. Progress report, September 15, 1996--September 14, 1997

Description: 'The primary focus of the research is the development of molecular theories of ion binding to clay minerals, with a view toward understanding the mechanism of radionuclide transport through soils. The overall aim of the research and the computational methods employed are essentially unchanged from those originally proposed. The research is split conceptually into three phases, based on the radionuclides considered. The first, cesium phase has an estimated completion time of 1.5 years from the project initiation. This phase is ongoing at this time. The second, strontium and third, uranium phases will be addressed in the second half of the project period. Phase 1 Accomplishments Code Development: A computer simulation code for the treatment of hydrated smectite and vermiculite clays with varying water content has been developed. This version of the code enables calculations under conditions of constant interlayer spacing or constant applied pressure, and for the complete series of interlayer alkali-metal ions. Final development of the code for (i), calculations of exchange free energies, and (ii), calculations at constant water chemical potential should be completed within the next month. This will allow the most important scientific issues of phase 1 to be fully addressed. Hydrated Clay Structure: The molecular structures of Cs{sup +}- and Na{sup +}-montmorillonite (a common swelling clay) have been investigated. The observed layer spacings versus water content of both clays agree well with experimental swelling curves. 1,2 This has provided validation of the simulation models. Comparison of cesium and sodium structures indicate that cesium preferentially forms inner-sphere complexes with the clay surface. The relationship of this structural observation to Na{sup +} Cs{sup +} exchange thermodynamics is presently under investigation. Dry Cs{sup +}-Montmorillonite Structure: It is thought that dry, cesium-substituted montmorillonites exist as mixed-layer structures with both symmetrical (hexagonal cavities overlapping) and non-symmetrical (hexagonal cavities shifted) stacking ...
Date: January 1, 1997
Creator: Smith, D.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Molecular dissection of the cellular mechanisms involved in nickel hyperaccumulation. 1997 annual progress report

Description: 'Phytoremediation, the use of plants for environmental cleanup of pollutants, including toxic metals, holds the potential to allow the economic restoration of heavy metal and radionuclide contaminated sites. A number of terrestrial plants are known to naturally accumulate high levels of metals in their shoots (1--2% dry weight), and these plants have been termed metal-hyperaccumulators. Clearly, the genetic traits that determine metal-hyperaccumulation offers the potential for the development of practical phytoremediation processes. The long-term objective is to rationally design and generate plants ideally suited for phytoremediation using this unique genetic material. Initially, the strategy will focus on isolating and characterizing the key genetic information needed for expression of the metal-hyperaccumulation phenotype. Recently, histidine has been shown to play a major role in Ni hyperaccumulation. Based on this information the authors propose to investigate, at the molecular level, the role of histidine biosynthesis in Ni hyperaccumuIation in Thlaspi goesingense, a Ni hyperaccumulator species.'
Date: October 28, 1997
Creator: Salt, D. E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The efficacy of oxidative coupling for promoting in-situ immobilization of hydroxylated aromatics in contaminated soil and sediment systems. 1998 annual progress report

Description: 'Hydroxylated aromatic compounds (HAC''s) and their precursors are common contaminants of surface and subsurface systems at DOE facilities. The environmental fate and transport of such compounds, particularly in subsurface systems, is generally dominated by their sorption and desorption by soils and sediments. Certain secondary chemical reactions, most specifically abiotic and/or enzymatic oxidative coupling, may be significant in controlling the sorption and subsequent desorption of such hydroxylated aromatics by soils and sediments. The principal objectives of this study are to investigate: (1) the role of abiotic/enzymatic coupling reactions on the immobilization of HAC''s; (2) the effects of environmental factors on such immobilization; and (3) preliminary engineering approaches utilizing enhanced abiotic/enzymatic coupling reactions to immobilize hydroxylated aromatics in-situ. Information gathered from the study will be useful in quantifying the behavior of this class of organic compounds in various subsurface contamination scenarios relevant to DOE facilities, and in specifying strategies for the selection and design of remediation technologies. Over the first two years of this three-year project, the authors have developed a significantly improved understanding of the mechanisms of hydroxylated aromatic compound sorption and immobilization by natural soils and sediments. Immobilization in this context is attributed to oxidative coupling of the hydroxylated aromatics subsequent to their sorption to a soil or sediment, and is quantified in terms of the amount of a sorbed target compound retained by a sorbent after a series of sequential water and solvent extractions. The presence of oxygen, metal oxides, and organic matter, all of which can potentially catalyze/facilitate the abiotic oxidative coupling of HAC''s, were investigated during these first two years. Three different HAC''s: phenol, trichlorophenol and o-cresol were included in the experimental program. Inorganic soil matrices were represented by a glacial wash sand (Wurtsmith sand) having very low organic content. Because the chemical nature of soil organic ...
Date: June 1, 1998
Creator: Weber, W.J. & Bhandari, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Advanced high resolution seismic imaging, material properties estimation and full wavefield inversion for the shallow subsurface. 1998 annual progress report

Description: 'The authors are developing advanced seismic data processing, imaging, and inversion methods for high resolution seismic reflection/refraction imaging and material property estimation of the shallow subsurface. The imaging methods are being developed to map the structural and material properties of aquifers and aquitards. This report summarizes work completed in the first seven months of a three year project which began in November 1997. The research is proceeding along three lines: data acquisition, data processing, and algorithm development.'
Date: June 1, 1998
Creator: Levander, A.; Zelt, C.A. & Symes, W.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Permanganate treatment of DNAPLs in reactive barriers and source zone flooding schemes. 1997 annual progress report

Description: 'The goals of this study are (1) to elucidate the basic mechanisms by which potassium permanganate oxidizes common chlorinated solvents, various constituents in aqueous solution, and porous-medium solids, and (2) to assess the potential for chemical oxidation by potassium permanganate to serve as a remedial scheme involving either source zone flooding or reactive barriers. The research plan involves a combined experimental/modeling study that builds on the extensive previous work in the area of reactive barrier systems, and modeling of reactive contaminant transport. The experimental studies are being undertaken at The Ohio State University by Dr. Schwartz and his co-workers. The modeling work is being conducted in Albuquerque, NM by Dr. Zhang of Intera, Inc. The workplan for this study is designed around the following four objectives (1) to describe through batch experiments the kinetics and mechanisms by which potassium permanganate oxidizes dissolved tetrachloroethene (PCE), trichloroethene (TCE), and dichloroethene (DCE), (2) to examine using column studies the nature and kinetics of reactions between potassium permanganate, residual DNAPLs (PCE, TCE, and DCE) and porous medium solids, (3) to represent the process understanding in flow and transport models that demonstrate the potential applicability of the approach, and (4) to apply the resulting computer code in the development of appropriate field tests for assessing the approach.'
Date: January 1, 1997
Creator: Schwartz, F.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

In-situ characterizations of dense non-aqueous phase liquids using partitioning tracers. Annual progress report, September 15, 1996--September 14, 1997

Description: 'This paper describes laboratory research conducted to investigate the use of partitioning tracers for the detection, volume estimation, and remediation performance assessment of vadose zones contaminated by nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). These laboratory studies used Ottawa sand and field soil packed columns. The columns were saturated, then reduced to residual saturations of water and NAPL, creating a three phase system of air, water, and NAPL. Conservative and partitioning gas tracers were injected into the column and their elutions were analyzed. The method of moments was used to estimate partition coefficients between the air and NAPL phases for each of the tracers. The partition coefficients and retardation factors are used to select appropriate tracers for NAPL detection and volume estimation in the field. This research identified several perfluorocarbon tracers suitable for use in the field and demonstrated the feasibility of using partitioning tracers as a tool for NAPL detection and volume estimation in the vadose zone.'
Date: January 23, 1998
Creator: Pope, G.A.; McKinney, D.C.; Gupta, A.D.; Jackson, R.E. & Jin, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Experimental determination of contaminant metal mobility as a function of temperature time and solution. 1998 annual progress report

Description: 'The objective of this work is to determine the fundamental data needed to predict the behavior of {sup 90}Sr at temperature and time scales appropriate to thermal remediation. The authors approach combines macroscopic sorption/precipitation and desorption/dissolution kinetic experiments which track changes in solution composition with direct molecular characterization of Sr in the solid phase using x-ray absorption spectroscopy. These experiments will be used to identify mechanistic geochemical reactions and their thermochemical properties that will be incorporated into geochemical computer codes. As of May 1998, the authors have completed most of the static sorption experiments as a function of temperature (25, 60, and 80 C), solution pH (4 to 10), initial Sr concentrations (10{sup -7} to 10{sup -3} M), and partial pressure of CO 2 (100% N 2 or atmospheric CO 2 ). They chose to study goethite, kaolinite, gibbsite, and amorphous silica because iron and aluminum (oxy)hydroxides, aluminosilicate clays, and quartz are key components in soils, sediments, and aquifers. The authors have completed x-ray absorption analysis of Sr sorption to kaolinite and goethite at 25{sup -}C, initial Sr of 10{sup -}3 M, and pH 9.'
Date: June 1, 1998
Creator: Carroll, S.; Bruton, C.; O'Day, P. & Sahai, N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Molecular characterization of a novel heavy metal uptake transporter from higher plants and its potential for use in phytoremediation. 1998 annual progress report

Description: 'Soils and waters contaminated with high levels of heavy metals such as Cadmium, Lead and Copper are detrimental to human and environmental health. Many human disorders have been attributed to environmental contamination by heavy metals. Removal of heavy metals from highly contaminated sites is therefore a very costly but necessary process that is currently being pursued. Recent research in several laboratories indicates that uptake of heavy metals into plants via the root system may provide a cost-effective approach for decontamination of certain heavy metal-laden soils and waters. Several mechanisms have been identified, which allow detoxification in the cytosol and vacuoles of plants. However, the molecular biological mechanisms by which heavy metals are transported from soils across the plasma membrane into roots have remained largely unknown. In recent research, the laboratory has cloned a cation uptake transporter cDNA from plants. Yeast cells expressing this cDNA show enhanced uptake of calcium and cadmium. The proposed research is testing the transport of toxic and nutrient metals by the encoded protein.'
Date: June 1, 1998
Creator: Schroeder, J.I.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Dynamics of coupled contaminant and microbial transport in heterogeneous porous media. 1997 annual progress report

Description: 'Dynamic microbial attachment/detachment occurs in subsurface systems in response to changing environmental conditions caused by contaminant movement and degradation. Understanding the environmental conditions and mechanisms by which anaerobic bacteria partition between aqueous and solid phases is a critical requirement for designing and evaluating in situ bioremediation efforts. This interdisciplinary research project will provide fundamental information on the attachment/detachment dynamics of anaerobic bacteria in heterogeneous porous media under growth and growth-limiting conditions. Experiments will provide information on passive and active attachment/detachment mechanisms used by growing anaerobes capable of reductive dechlorination. Theoretical representations of these attachment/detachment mechanisms will be incorporated into existing groundwater flow and contaminant transport models that incorporate heterogeneity effects and can be used to predict behavior at field scales. These mechanistic-based models will be tested against experimental data provided through controlled laboratory experiments in heterogeneous porous media in large (meter-scale) 2-D flow cells. In addition to a mechanistic-based predictive model, this research will lead to new theories for the transient spatial distribution of microbial populations and contaminant plumes in heterogeneous porous media, improving the capability for designing staged remediation strategies for dealing with mixed contaminants.'
Date: June 1, 1997
Creator: Ginn, T.R.; Boone, D.R.; Fletcher, M.M.; Friedrich, D.M. & Murphy, E.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Plant rhizosphere effects on metal mobilization and transport. 1998 annual progress report

Description: 'Information on the mechanism of how plants mobilize, uptake, and metabolize metal ions is very limited. Especially deficient is the understanding of these processes involving pollutant metal ions and interactions among these ions. Based on the current knowledge regarding nutrient ions, it is clear that elucidation of rhizospheric processes such as exudation of organic ligands by plant roots and plant metabolism/adaptation involving these biogenic chelators is critically important. A mechanistic insight into these processes will advance knowledge in microbe-plant host interactions and how metal ions are mobilized, immobilized, and sequestered by these interactions. This, in turn, is essential to applications such as phytobioremediation and microbioremediation of metal ion pollution. Root exudation also serves many other important rhizosphere functions including energy supply for microbial degradation of organic pollutants, structuring of microbial community, and the formation of soil humic materials which are considered to be a major sink for both organic and inorganic pollutants. How root exudates function is critically dependent on the chemical nature of exudate components. Therefore, a comprehensive characterization of all major exudate components, regardless of their chemical class, should facilitate the development and implementation of bioremediation for both organic and inorganic pollutants. Therefore, the objectives of this project are: (1) To obtain a comprehensive composition of major organic components in plant root exudates as a function of different metal ions; (2) To examine plant metabolic response(s) to these metal ion treatments, with emphasis on biosynthetic pathways of organic ligands; and (3) To investigate the effect(s) of soil microbial (e.g. mycorrhizae) association on (1) and (2).'
Date: June 1, 1998
Creator: Fan, T.W.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Control of biologically active degradation zones by vertical heterogeneity: Applications in fractured media. 1998 annual progress report

Description: 'The objective of this research is to determine the relationship between biologically active contaminant degradation zones in a fractured, subsurface medium and vertical geological heterogeneities. The research is being performed on samples collected from the Test Area North (TAN) site at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) where a dissolved trichloroethylene (TCE) plume is migrating in the basalts and interbed sediments of the Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP) aquifer. Results are leading to an enhanced understanding of the constraints placed on the activities and distribution of TCE-degrading organisms by the geochemical and hydrological environment. This understanding allows better decisions to be made regarding the use of remedial technologies such as natural attenuation and in-situ bioremediation at geologically complex waste sites. Through this research, investigations conducted by the DOE Subsurface Science Program at TAN have been extended in order to develop a mechanistic understanding of the coupled geomicrobial and hydrogeochemical processes that are necessary to predict field-scale intrinsic degradation rates of TCE. The research objective is being accomplished by characterizing paired cores and water samples from boreholes located in differing geochemical and flow environments within the plume. Analysis of these samples will allow the determination of the spatial correlation between microbial degradation and preferred flow paths for the contaminant and required electron donors and acceptors. A combination of traditional microbiological methods (e.g., enrichments) and molecular tools are being used to characterize the indigenous microbial communities. This report summarizes work conducted after 1.5 years of a three year project.'
Date: June 1, 1998
Creator: Colwell, F.S.; Smith, R.; McKinley, J.P.; Fredrickson, J.K.; Onstott, T.C. & Reysenbach, A.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Microbial mineral transformations at the Fe(II)/Fe(III) redox boundary for solid phase capture of strontium and other metal/radionuclide contaminants. Annual progress report, September 15, 1996--June 15, 1997

Description: 'The objectives of the project remain the same as those stated in the original proposal. Specifically, to determine microbiological and geochemical controls on carbonate mineral precipitation reactions that are caused by bacterial reduction of Fe(III)-oxides, and identify contributions of these processes to solid phase capture of strontium and other metal/radionuclide contaminants. The project on microbial mineral transformations at the Fe(II)/Fe(III) redox boundary for the solid phase capture of strontium is progressing well. Thus far, the authors have been able to demonstrate that: pH and DIC concentrations increase during microbial reduction of HFO in batch culture experiments with G. metallireducens lasting 30 days with high concentrations of strontium (1.0 \265m) and calcium (10 \265m) do not inhibit microbial HFO reduction, the extent of change in pH and DIC concentrations brings about supersaturation with respect to carbonate minerals including siderite (FeCO{sub 3}), strontianite (SrCO{sub 3}), and calcite/aragonite (CaCO{sub 3}); in addition, precipitation of siderite has been documented in cultures of HFO reducing bacteria significant amounts of strontium and calcium (40 to 50% of the total initial concentration) sorb to particulate solids (i.e., HFO and bacteria cells)-in batch culture experiments l sorption of strontium to HFO conforms with Langmuir single site sorption models derived from corresponding mass action and mass balance relationships anticipated from thermodynamic equilibrium considerations the sorption behavior of strontium with S. alga is more complex and seems to involve two sets of reactive surface sites on the bacterial cells; a high affinity site of low total sorption capacity, and a low affinity site with high sorption capacity the total strontium sorption capacities of S. alga and HFO are comparable the observed solid phase partioning of strontium in the culture experiments is in excellent agreement with sorption characteristics measured with HFO and S. alga.'
Date: January 1, 1997
Creator: Ferris, F.G. & Roden, E.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Heavy metal pumps in plants. 1997 annual progress report

Description: 'Plants have been proposed as a bioremediation tool to help remove toxic heavy metals from contaminated land and water. However, little is known about how plants take up heavy metals from the soil and transport them to different parts of the plant. An important long term goal is to understand how heavy metals, such as copper and cadmium, are transported across the plasma membrane of plant cells. The proposed research is focused on a putative heavy metal uptake pump, AXA2p [Arabidopsis X (unknown heavy metal) ATPase, isoform 2 protein], identified in a model plant, Arabidopsis. AXA belongs to a super-family of ion-translocating P-type ATPases and is the first heavy metal pump cloned from plants. AXA2 is most similar to a subfamily of pumps recently identified in bacteria, yeast and humans which appear to pump heavy metals such as copper and cadmium. Three specific aims are proposed: (1) Determine the ion specificity of the AXA2 pump, (2) Determine how pumping activity is regulated, and (3) Determine if an increased uptake of specific heavy metals can be achieved by engineering a transgenic plant with a hyper-active pump. The hypothesis being tested is that AXA2 encodes a high affinity uptake pump for copper, with lower affinity for metals such as cadmium, zinc and nickel. Fundamental research on heavy metal transporters may eventually permit transgenic plants to be engineered with specific heavy metal uptake systems useful for bioremediation. The long term goal of the proposed research is to understand how heavy metals, such as copper and cadmium, are taken up from the soil and translocated throughout the plant. The focus is on a putative heavy metal pump, AXA2p [Arabidopsis X (unknown heavy metal) ATPase, isoform 2 protein], identified in a model plant, Arabidopsis. AXA2 belongs to a large family of ion-translocating P-type ATPases. AXA2p ...
Date: January 1, 1997
Creator: Harper, J.F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Plant rhizosphere effects on metal mobilization and transport. 1997 annual progress report

Description: 'During the funding period of 1996--1997, the authors explored the utility of multi-nuclear, two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for a comprehensive analysis of barley root exudates collected under Fe sufficient and deficient conditions. As both structural and quantitative information was obtained directly from crude root exudates using this approach, no tedious sample fractionation was necessary, which will greatly facilitate future chemical characterization of root exudates in general. They found that the phytosiderophore mugineic acids (including 2{prime}-deoxymugineic acid, mugineic acid, and 3-epi-hydroxymugineic acid) were readily identified and quantified in crude exudate samples along with a number of amino and organic acids. The amount of mugineic acids excreted was correlated positively with the extent of Fe deficiency with 3-epi-hydroxymugineic acid being the most prominent component. The total Fe chelating capacity was also measured using the ferrozine assay and compared with the production of the mugineic acids. They were surprised to find that the mugineic acids may account for a part of the Fe chelating capacity, especially under mild and moderatley Fe deficient conditions. Lactate, alanine, y-aminobutyrate, malate, and glycinebetaine collectively may contribute to a significant fraction of the Fe chelating capacity. In light of the known stimulatory effect of alanine and citrate on metal availability to algae (Campell, 1995), the function of these low molecular weight metabolites as vehicles for Fe or metal uptake in general warrant further investigation. This work is now published in Analytical Biochemistry 251, 57-68 ( 1997). They then proceeded to apply the above approach to investigate the interaction of elevated cadmium (Cd) with Fe deficiency in gramineous plants. They have completed one each series of cadmium (Cd) treatments of barley and wheat seedlings under Fe sufficient and deficient conditions. The purpose of these experiments was to examine the role of mugineic ...
Date: October 1, 1997
Creator: Fan, T.W.M.; Higashi, R.M. & Crowley, D.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Molecular profiling of microbial communities from contaminated sources: Use of substractive cloning methods and rDNA spacer sequences. 1997 annual progress report

Description: 'This project is to develop molecular methods for rapid characterization of microbial communities in contaminated ecosystems. The authors are exploring the use of {sup 16}s ribosomal DNA intergenic spacer regions (ISRs) to profile community composition. The choice proves to be a good one: there are 200--550 bases of 1 to 3 variable regions from which to choose species-specific probes, as well as 2--4 stretches of conserved sequence from which to develop universal PCR (polymerase chain reaction) primers. Preliminary community characterization is complete, and several types of arrays are under development to determine the types of bacteria present and the status of the ground water. Profiling the community composition of polluted groundwater will impact the broad field of microbial ecology as well as mixed-waste bioremediation. Results The samples the authors have been analysing were provided by Dr. Fred Brockman from Pacific Northwest Laboratory, and were collected at the US DOE Hanford site, Washington state. The samples were microbial filtrates from ground water polluted with 2 mg/L carbon tetrachloride and 250 mg/L nitrate and subjected to enrichment (acetate + nitrate) and recirculation. This project is described in some detail in PNNL-11113, Accelerated In Situ Bioremediation of Groundwater, by M.J. Truex, B.S. Hooker, and D.B. Anderson, July 1996.'
Date: December 1, 1997
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A hybrid hydrologic-geophysical inverse technique for the assessment and monitoring of leachates in the vadose zone. 1998 annual progress report

Description: 'The objective of this study is to develop and field test a new, integrated Hybrid Hydrologic-Geophysical Inverse Technique (HHGIT) for characterization of the vadose zone at contaminated sites. This new approach to site characterization and monitoring can provide detailed maps of hydrogeological heterogeneity and the extent of contamination by combining information from electric resistivity tomography (ERT) surveys, statistical information about heterogeneity and hydrologic processes, and sparse hydrologic data. Because the electrical conductivity of the vadose zone (from the ERT measurements) can be correlated to the fluid saturation and/or contaminant concentration, the hydrologic and geophysical measurements are related. As of the 21st month of a 36-month project, a three-dimensional stochastic hydrologic inverse model for heterogeneous vadose zones has been developed. This model employs pressure and moisture content measurements under both transient and steady flow conditions to estimate unsaturated hydraulic parameters. In this model, an innovative approach to sequentially condition the estimate using temporal measurements has been incorporated. This allows us to use vast amounts of pressure and moisture content information measured at different times while keeping the computational effort manageable. Using this model the authors have found that the relative importance of the pressure and moisture content measurements in defining the different vadose zone parameters depends on whether the soil is wet or dry. They have also learned that pressure and moisture content measurements collected during steady state flow provide the best characterization of heterogeneity compared to other types of hydrologic data. These findings provide important guidance to the design of sampling scheme of the field experiment described below.'
Date: June 1, 1998
Creator: Alumbaugh, D.L.; Glass, R.J.; Yeh, T.C. & LaBrecque, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Reduction and immobilization of radionuclides and toxic metal ions using combined zero valent iron and anaerobic bacteria. Year one technical progress report

Description: 'The objective of this project is to design a combined abiotic/microbial, reactive, permeable, in-situ barrier with sufficient reductive potential to prevent downgradient migration of toxic metal ions. The field-scale application of this technology would utilize anaerobic digester sludge, Fe(O) particles for supporting anaerobic biofilms, and suitable aquifer material for construction of the barrier. The major goals for Year 1 were to establish the sulfate reducing mixed culture, to obtain sources of iron metal, and to conduct background experiments which will establish baseline rates for abiotic chromium reduction rates. Research completed to date is described.'
Date: October 1, 1997
Creator: Weathers, L.J. & Katz, L.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Construction of bending magnet beamline at the APS for environmental studies. 1998 annual progress report

Description: 'Design and construction of a bending magnet beamline at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) by the Pacific Northwest Consortium-Collaborative Access Team (PNC-CAT). The beamline will be optimized for x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) studies with a major focus on environmental issues. The beamline will share the experimental facilities under development at the neighboring undulator based insertion device beamline. It will utilize these facilities for XAS of both bulk and surface samples, with spatial and elemental imaging, on toxic and radioactive samples. It will help meet the rapidly growing need for the application of these techniques to environmental problems. This report summarizes progress after 1-1/2 years of a 3-year project. The original scope of the project was to build a basic bending magnet beamline. Since the start of the project the authors have obtained addition funding from DOE-BES for the PNC-CAT activities. This has allowed us to expand the scope of the original proposed bending magnet beamline. Additional items now planned include a full sized experimental enclosure separate from the first optical enclosure (FOE), a white beam vertically collimating/focusing mirror providing improved flux and focusing, and enhanced experimental capabilities. Construction of the FOE and new experimental enclosure are complete along with full sector utilities, and the FOE is currently undergoing validation for its radiation integrity. The major beamline components are still being funded by the original EMSP project, and their status is described'
Date: June 1, 1998
Creator: Stern, E.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department