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Surveillance of Site A and Plot M - Report for 2005.

Description: The results of the environmental surveillance program conducted at Site A/Plot M in the Palos Forest Preserve area for Calendar Year 2005 are presented. Based on the results of the 1976-1978 radiological characterization of the site, a determination was made that a surveillance program be established. The characterization study determined that very low levels of hydrogen-3 (as tritiated water) had migrated from the burial ground and were present in two nearby handpumped picnic wells. The current surveillance program began in 1980 and consists of sample collection and analysis of surface and subsurface water. The results of the analyses are used to (1) monitor the migration pathway of water from the burial ground (Plot M) to the handpumped picnic wells, (2) establish if buried radionuclides other than hydrogen-3 have migrated, and (3) monitor the presence of radioactive and chemically hazardous materials in the environment of the area. Hydrogen-3 in the Red Gate Woods picnic wells was still detected this year, but the average and maximum concentrations were significantly less than found earlier. Hydrogen-3 continues to be detected in a number of wells, boreholes, dolomite holes, and a surface stream. Analyses since 1984 have indicated the presence of low levels of strontium-90 in water from a number of boreholes next to Plot M. The results of the surveillance program continue to indicate that the radioactivity remaining at Site A/Plot M does not endanger the health or safety of the public visiting the site, using the picnic area, or living in the vicinity.
Date: April 10, 2006
Creator: Golchert, N. W. & Oversight, ESH /QA
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Surveillance of site A and plot M, report for 2007.

Description: The results of the environmental surveillance program conducted at Site A/Plot M in the Palos Forest Preserve area for Calendar Year 2007 are presented. Based on the results of the 1976-1978 radiological characterization of the site, a determination was made that a surveillance program be established. The characterization study determined that very low levels of hydrogen-3 (as tritiated water) had migrated from the burial ground and were present in two nearby hand pumped picnic wells. The current surveillance program began in 1980 and consists of sample collection and analysis of surface and subsurface water. The results of the analyses are used to: (1) monitor the migration pathway of water from the burial ground (Plot M) to the hand-pumped picnic wells, (2) establish if other buried radionuclides have migrated, and (3) monitor the presence of radioactive materials in the environment of the area. Hydrogen-3 in the Red Gate Woods picnic wells was still detected this year, but the average and maximum concentrations were significantly less than found earlier. Hydrogen-3 continues to be detected in a number of wells, boreholes, dolomite holes, and a surface stream. Analyses since 1984 have indicated the presence of low levels of strontium-90 in water from a number of boreholes next to Plot M. The results of the surveillance program continue to indicate that the radioactivity remaining at Site A/Plot M does not endanger the health or safety of the public visiting the site, using the picnic area, or living in the vicinity.
Date: March 25, 2008
Creator: Golchert, N. W. & Oversight, ESH /QA
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Secondary sulfate minerals from Alum Cave Bluff: Microscopy and microanalysis

Description: Microcrystals of secondary sulfate minerals from Alum Cave Bluff, Great Smoky Mountains National Park, were examined by scanning electron microscopy and identified by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) in the SEM. Among the samples the author discovered three new rare-earth sulfates: coskrenite-(Ce), levinsonite-(Y), and zugshunstite-(Ce). Other minerals illustrated in this report include sulfur, tschermigite, gypsum, epsomite, melanterite, halotrichite, apjohnite, jarosite, slavikite, magnesiocopiapite, and diadochite. Additional specimens whose identification is more tentative include pickeringite, aluminite, basaluminite, and botryogen. Alum Cave is a ``Dana locality`` for apjohnite and potash alum, and is the first documented North American occurrence of slavikite.
Date: July 1, 1997
Creator: Lauf, R.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Livermore Big Trees Park: 1998 summary results

Description: This report summarizes work conducted in 1998 by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to determine the extent and origin of plutonium at concentrations above background levels at Big Trees Park in the city of Livermore. This summary includes the project background and sections that explain the sampling, radiochemical and data analysis, and data interpretation. This report is a summary report only and is not intended as a rigorous technical or statistical analysis of the data.
Date: August 13, 1999
Creator: Gallegos, G; MacQueen, D & Surano, K
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Livermore Big Trees Park Soil Survey

Description: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) will sample and analyze soil in the Big Trees Park area in Livermore, California, to determine if the initial level of plutonium (Pu) in a soil sample taken by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in September 1993 can be confirmed. Nineteen samples will be collected and analyzed: 4 in the area where the initial EPA sample was taken, 2 in the nearby Arroyo Seco, 12 in scattered uncovered soil areas in the park and nearby school, and 1 from the sandbox of a nearby apartment complex. Two quality control (QC) samples (field duplicates of the preceding samples) win also be collected and analyzed. This document briefly describes the purpose behind the sampling, the sampling rationale, and the methodology.
Date: January 1, 1995
Creator: McConachie, W.A. & Failor, R.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Estimated ground-water discharge by evapotranspiration, Ash Meadows Area, Nye County, Nevada, 1994

Description: Ground water discharges from the regional ground-water flow system that underlies the eastern part of the Nevada Test Site through numerous springs and seeps in the Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge in southern Nevada. The total spring discharge was estimated to be about 17,000 acre-feet per year by earlier studies. Previous studies estimated that about 10,500 acre-feet of this discharge was lost to evapotranspiration. The present study was undertaken to develop a more rigorous approach to estimating ground-water discharge in the Ash Meadows area. Part of the study involves detailed field investigation of evapotranspiration. Data collection began in early 1994. The results of the first year of study provide a basis for making preliminary estimates of ground-water discharge by evapotranspiration. An estimated 13,100 acre-feet of ground water was evapotranspired from about 6,800 acres of marsh and salt-grass. Additional 3,500 acre-feet may have been transpired from the open water and from about 1,460 acres of other areas of Ash Meadows in which field studies have not yet been made.
Date: May 1, 1997
Creator: Nichols, W.D.; Laczniak, R.J.; DeMeo, G.A. & Rapp, T.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Effects of hydropower operations on recreational use and nonuse values at Glen Canyon and Flaming Gorge Dams

Description: Increases in streamflows are generally positively related to the use values of angling and white-water boating, and constant flows tend to increase the use values more than fluctuating flows. In most instances, however, increases in streamflows beyond some threshold level cause the use values to decrease. Expenditures related to angling and white-water boating account for about $24 million of activity in the local economy around Glen Canyon Dam and $24.8 million in the local economy around flaming Gorge Dam. The range of operational scenarios being considered in the Western Area Power Administration`s Electric Power Marketing Environmental Impact Statement, when use rates are held constant, could change the combined use value of angling and white-water boating below Glen Canyon Dam, increasing it by as much as 50%, depending on prevailing hydrological conditions. Changes in the combined use value below Flaming Gorge Dam could range from a decrease of 9% to an increase of 26%. Nonuse values, such as existence and bequest values, could also make a significant contribution to the total value of each site included in this study; however, methodological and data limitations prevented estimating how each operational scenario could change nonuse values.
Date: March 1, 1995
Creator: Carlson, J.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Research reactor de-fueling and fuel shipment

Description: Planning for the Georgia Institute of Technology Research Reactor operations during the 1996 Summer Olympic Games began in early 1995. Before any details could be outlined, several preliminary administrative decisions had to be agreed upon by state, city, and university officials. The two major administrative decisions involving the reactor were (1) the security level and requirements and (2) the fuel status of the reactor. The Georgia Tech Research Reactor (GTRR) was a heavy-water moderated and cooled reactor, fueled with high-enriched uranium. The reactor was first licensed in 1964 with an engineered lifetime of thirty years. The reactor was intended for use in research applications and as a teaching facility for nuclear engineering students and reactor operators. Approximately one year prior to the olympics, the Georgia Tech administration decided that the GTRR fuel would be removed. In addition, a heightened, beyond regulatory requirements, security system was to be implemented. This report describes the scheduling, operations, and procedures.
Date: August 1, 1998
Creator: Ice, R.D.; Jawdeh, E. & Strydom, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Ground water elevation monitoring at the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Salt Lake City, Utah, Vitro processing site

Description: In February 1994, a ground water level monitoring program was begun at the Vitro processing site. The purpose of the program was to evaluate how irrigating the new golf driving range affected ground water elevations in the unconfined aquifer. The program also evaluated potential impacts of a 9-hole golf course planned as an expansion of the driving range. The planned golf course expansion would increase the area to be irrigated and, thus, the water that could infiltrate the processing site soil to recharge the unconfined aquifer. Increased water levels in the aquifer could alter the ground water flow regime; contaminants in ground water could migrate off the site or could discharge to bodies of surface water in the area. The potential effects of expanding the golf course have been evaluated, and a report is being prepared. Water level data obtained during this monitoring program indicate that minor seasonal mounding may be occurring in response to irrigation of the driving range. However, the effects of irrigation appear small in comparison to the effects of precipitation. There are no monitor wells in the area that irrigation would affect most; that data limitation makes interpretations of water levels and the possibility of ground water mounding uncertain. Limitations of available data are discussed in the conclusion.
Date: April 1, 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Surveillance of Site A and Plot M - Report for 2004.

Description: The results of the environmental surveillance program conducted at Site A/Plot M in the Palos Forest Preserve area for Calendar Year 2004 are presented. Based on the results of the 1976-1978 radiological characterization of the site, a determination was made that a surveillance program be established. The characterization study determined that very low levels of hydrogen-3 (as tritiated water) had migrated from the burial ground and were present in two nearby hand-pumped picnic wells. The current surveillance program began in 1980 and consists of sample collection and analysis of surface and subsurface water. The results of the analyses are used to (1) monitor the migration pathway of water from the burial ground (Plot M) to the handpumped picnic wells, (2) establish if buried radionuclides other than hydrogen-3 have migrated, and (3) monitor the presence of radioactive and chemically hazardous materials in the environment of the area. Hydrogen-3 in the Red Gate Woods picnic wells was still detected this year, but the average and maximum concentrations were significantly less than found earlier. Hydrogen-3 continues to be detected in a number of wells, boreholes, dolomite holes, and a surface stream. Analyses since 1984 have indicated the presence of low levels of strontium-90 in water from a number of boreholes next to Plot M. The results of the surveillance program continue to indicate that the radioactivity remaining at Site A/Plot M does not endanger the health or safety of the public visiting the site, using the picnic area, or living in the vicinity.
Date: April 6, 2005
Creator: Golchert, N. W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Bronx Zoo Fuel Cell Project

Description: A 200 kW Fuel Cell has been installed in the Lion House, Bronx Zoo, NY. The Fuel Cell is a 200 kW phosphoric acid type manufactured by United Technologies Corporation (UTC) and will provide thermal energy at 725,000 Btu/hr.
Date: September 30, 2007
Creator: Pham, Hoang
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Factors Affecting the Recreational Fishery in Moses Lake, Washington, 2000-2001 Annual Report.

Description: The Moses Lake Project (project No. 199502800) was first funded by Bonneville Power Administration during the FY 99. Work commenced and proceeded through September 2001 when questions arouse on the Scope of Work. Due to funding issues at the beginning of FY 2001 we were unable to secure monies to continue with our proposed scope of work. Consequently, the Moses Lake Project was reduced to one full-time employee. An extension of fifty thousand dollars was granted in which the project with one remaining member by October 2001 continued to operate. By December 2001 the NWPPC granted an additional 20K in spending to secure an advisor that could assist in providing a proposal that the ISRP would find amenable. By Jan 2002, the Moses Lake staff put Dr. David Bennett, from the University of Idaho on payroll. With the guidance of Dr. Bennett the Moses Lake project staff was successful in turning in a new version of the proposal and ultimately received funding by July of 2002. Consequently, the lack of manpower and time spent revising and resubmitting said proposal hampered progress. Consequently, this report covers work conducted on the original Scope of Work (SOW) to July 2002 and then follows the new and accepted SOW from July 2002 through September 2002. Work on the tasks within the newest proposal began prior to official acceptance so as not to loose the window of opportunity to collect data during the summer field season. As of July 2000 we moved forward and began the appropriate tasks outlined in our scope of work. Therefore, portions of the FY 2001 annual report address tasks outlined in the original (appendix 1, original FY2000 SOW) and newest scope(s) of work (Appendix 2, new FY 2000 SOW).
Date: February 4, 2003
Creator: Burgess, Dave
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Towards solving the conflict between geothermal resource uses

Description: The development of a geothermal resource for energy is often seriously hindered by conflict with the alternative use of the same geothermal resource for recreation. Incompatibility between the development of geothermal energy and the enjoyment of surficial thermal features has constrained development in Japan, New Zealand, Europe, and the United States. Four approaches to the resolution of this problem have been identified. They are (1) research, (2) new technology, (3) design, and (4) marketing.
Date: October 1, 1983
Creator: Intemann, P.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix J: Recreation.

Description: This Appendix J of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Columbia River System discusses impacts on the recreational activities in the region. Major sections include the following: scope and processes; recreation in the Columbia River Basin today - by type, location, participation, user characteristics, factors which affect usage, and managing agencies; recreation analysis procedures and methodology; and alternatives and their impacts.
Date: November 1, 1995
Creator: Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Hazard analysis of Miamisburg Park Improvement Project

Description: The City of Miamisburg plans to modify two existing small ponds just west of Mound Laboratory in the Community Park. The north pond will be deepened and made into a solar energy pond to heat a bath house and swimming pool, and the south pond will be deepened and made into a fishing pond. Because the sediment in both ponds contains small amounts of plutonium and will be moved during the modifications, this work has been reviewed for potential health and safety impacts. This analysis covered the health and safety of the public on a long-term basis and of the workers involved in the short-term modifications. The doses to man, both long and short term, were calculated for all routes of entry into the body including inhalation, ingestion, and absorption where applicable. In the preparation of this analysis, very conservative assumptions were utilized. The conclusion in all cases was the same: the potential radiation exposures represent no significant risk to the health and safety of the construction workers or the park visitors. The improvements to be made in the park involve mixing and dilution of the existing sediments with other soils, providing further reductions in the calculated radiation doses to man. The City of Miamisburg can proceed with the improvements to the park, as planned, resulting in no short-term or long-term hazard to the citizens of Miamisburg.
Date: March 17, 1977
Creator: Farmer, B.M.; Robinson, B. & Westendorf, W.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Analysis of the potential for a coal-fired power plant to cause visibility impairment in a National Park

Description: The visibility analysis examined potential impacts of the Healy Clean Coal Project (HCCP), a proposed 50-MW coal-fired power plant to be built adjacent to the existing 25-MW Healy Unit 1 (a conventional pulverized-coal unit) in Healy, Alaska, about 6 km north of Denali National Park. The analysis used the PLUVUE I visibility model to calculate ambient concentrations of species in the plume with potential to cause visible effects. The optical effects were determined in separate calculations when the sun was within about 10 {degree} of the horizon, in the winter. Results indicated that almost all the potential impact would be caused by NO{sub x}. Analysis of the number of daytime hours per year that the HCCP plume would be perceptible from the Visitor Access Center, shows that the predicted number of hours is extremely low for the base case: 2 hours for the north sight path, 2 hours for the south sight path, and a total of 2 hours. Sensitivity analysis shows more sensitivity to changing the perceptibility threshold than extending the sight paths. Cumulative visibility impacts of air emissions resulting from the simultaneous operation of the HCCP and Healy Unit No. 1 were also evaluated; results show that the percentage of hours affected is much less than 1% of daytime hours during the year.
Date: June 1, 1995
Creator: Richards, L.W. & Miller, R.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Results of sediment and water sampling for inorganic, organic, and radionuclide analysis at recreation areas and water intakes -- Norris, Melton Hill, and Watts Bar Lakes. Data report

Description: Suspected water quality contamination in Watts Bar Reservoir as a result of activities in past decades at the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Oak Ridge facility is of public concern. DOE, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), the State of Tennessee, and other agencies and officials have received many inquiries from the public in recent years concerning this suspected pollution, especially how this potential contamination may affect the health and safety of those persons who use beaches in the area for swimming or other water-body-contact sports. As a result of these concerns, TVA conducted a study in May and June 1991 to obtain data on potential contaminants of concern in the water and sediment of Watts Bar Reservoir. TVA collected water and sediment samples at a total of 29 sites, including 18 recreation areas and 11 water intake locations, located throughout Norris, Melton Hill, and Watts Bar Reservoirs. The samples were analyzed for radionuclides, metals, and organic compounds which could pose a threat to human health.
Date: October 1, 1991
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Surveillance of site A and plot M - report for 2003.

Description: The results of the environmental surveillance program conducted at Site A/Plot M in the Palos Forest Preserve area for Calendar Year 2003 are presented. Based on the results of the 1976-1978 radiological characterization of the site, a determination was made that a surveillance program be established. The characterization study determined that very low levels of hydrogen-3 (as tritiated water) had migrated from the burial ground and were present in two nearby hand-pumped picnic wells. The current surveillance program began in 1980 and consists of sample collection and analysis of surface and subsurface water. The results of the analyses are used to (1) monitor the migration pathway of water from the burial ground (Plot M) to the handpumped picnic wells, (2) establish if buried radionuclides other than hydrogen-3 have migrated, and (3) monitor the presence of radioactive and chemically hazardous materials in the environment of the area. Hydrogen-3 in the Red Gate Woods picnic wells was still detected this year, but the average and maximum concentrations were significantly less than found earlier. Hydrogen-3 continues to be detected in a number of wells, boreholes, dolomite holes, and a surface stream. Analyses since 1984 have indicated the presence of low levels of strontium-90 in water from a number of boreholes next to Plot M. The results of the surveillance program continue to indicate that the radioactivity remaining at Site A/Plot M does not endanger the health or safety of the public visiting the site, using the picnic area, or living in the vicinity.
Date: May 17, 2004
Creator: Golchert, N. W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Surveillance of site A and plot M - report for 2002.

Description: The results of the environmental surveillance program conducted at Site A/Plot M in the Palos Forest Preserve area for Calendar Year 2002 are presented. Based on the results of the 1976-1978 radiological characterization of the site, a determination was made that a surveillance program be established. The characterization study determined that very low levels of hydrogen-3 (as tritiated water) had migrated from the burial ground and were present in two nearby hand-pumped picnic wells. The current surveillance program began in 1980 and consists of sample collection and analysis of surface and subsurface water. The results of the analyses are used to (1) monitor the migration pathway of water from the burial ground (Plot M) to the handpumped picnic wells, (2) establish if buried radionuclides other than hydrogen-3 have migrated, and (3) monitor the presence of radioactive and chemically hazardous materials in the environment of the area. Hydrogen-3 in the Red Gate Woods picnic wells was still detected this year, but the average and maximum concentrations were significantly less than found earlier. Hydrogen-3 continues to be detected in a number of wells, boreholes, dolomite holes, and a surface stream. Analyses since 1984 have indicated the presence of low levels of strontium-90 in water from a number of boreholes next to Plot M. The results of the surveillance program continue to indicate that the radioactivity remaining at Site A/Plot M does not endanger the health or safety of the public visiting the site, using the picnic area, or living in the vicinity.
Date: April 16, 2003
Creator: Golchert, N. W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Surveillance of site A and plot M - report for 2001.

Description: The results of the environmental surveillance program conducted at Site A/Plot M in the Palos Forest Preserve area for Calendar Year 2001 are presented. Based on the results of the 1976-1978 radiological characterization of the site, a determination was made that a surveillance program be established. The characterization study determined that very low levels of hydrogen-3 (as tritiated water) had migrated from the burial ground and were present in two nearby hand-pumped picnic wells. The current surveillance program began in 1980 and consists of sample collection and analysis of surface and subsurface water. The results of the analyses are used to (1) monitor the migration pathway of water from the burial ground (Plot M) to the handpumped picnic wells, (2) establish if buried radionuclides other than hydrogen-3 have migrated, and (3) monitor the presence of radioactive and chemically hazardous materials in the environment of the area. Hydrogen-3 in the Red Gate Woods picnic wells was still detected this year, but the average and maximum concentrations were significantly less than found earlier. Hydrogen-3 continues to be detected in a number of wells, boreholes, dolomite holes, and a surface stream. Analyses since 1984 have indicated the presence of low levels of strontium-90 in water from a number of boreholes next to Plot M. The results of the surveillance program continue to indicate that the radioactivity remaining at Site A/Plot M does not endanger the health or safety of the public visiting the site, using the picnic area, or living in the vicinity.
Date: June 17, 2002
Creator: Golchert, N. W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Natural resource management activities at the Savannah River Site. Environmental Assessment

Description: This environmental assessment (EA) reviews the environmental consequences of ongoing natural resource management activities on the Savannah River Site (SRS). Appendix A contains the Natural Resources Management Plant (NRMP). While several SRS organizations have primary responsibilities for different elements of the plan, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Forest Service, Savannah River Forest Station (SRFS) is responsible for most elements. Of the river scenarios defined in 1985, the High-Intensity Management alternative established the upper bound of environmental consequences; it represents a more intense level of resource management than that being performed under current resource management activities. This alternative established compliance mechanisms for several natural resource-related requirements and maximum practical timber harvesting. Similarly, the Low-Intensity Management alternative established the lower bound of environmental consequences and represents a less intense level of resource management than that being performed under current resource management activities. This alternative also established compliance mechanisms, but defined a passively managed natural area. The Proposed Action of this EA describes the current level of multiple-natural resource management. This EA reviews the proposed action, and the high and low intensity alternative scenarios.
Date: July 1, 1993
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Surveillance of Site A and Plot M - Report for 2006.

Description: The results of the environmental surveillance program conducted at Site A/Plot M in the Palos Forest Preserve area for Calendar Year 2006 are presented. Based on the results of the 1976-1978 radiological characterization of the site, a determination was made that a surveillance program be established. The characterization study determined that very low levels of hydrogen-3 (as tritiated water) had migrated from the burial ground and were present in two nearby hand-pumped picnic wells. The current surveillance program began in 1980 and consists of sample collection and analysis of surface and subsurface water. The results of the analyses are used to (1) monitor the migration pathway of water from the burial ground (PlotM) to the hand pumped picnic wells, (2) establish if buried radionuclides other than hydrogen-3 have migrated, and (3) monitor the presence of radioactive and chemically hazardous materials in the environment of the area. Hydrogen-3 in the Red GateWoods picnic wells was still detected this year, but the average and maximum concentrations were significantly less than found earlier. Hydrogen-3 continues to be detected in a number of wells, boreholes, dolomite holes, and a surface stream. Analyses since 1984 have indicated the presence of low levels of strontium-90 in water from a number of boreholes next to Plot M. The results of the surveillance program continue to indicate that the radioactivity remaining at Site A/Plot M does not endanger the health or safety of the public visiting the site, using the picnic area, or living in the vicinity.
Date: May 7, 2007
Creator: Golchert, N. W. & Oversight, ESH /QA
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Installation of water-to-air heat pump heating/cooling systems in structures at Leroy Percy State Park. Final technical report

Description: The project involved the installation of water-to-air heat pump heating/cooling systems in three structures at Leroy Percy State Park. The three structures include the Assistant Manager's residence, Cabin No. 1 and Cabin No. 2. The project is now completed and the three structures are successfully heated by the natural hot artesian water source and are cooled by cold water available from the park's water system.
Date: June 18, 1982
Creator: Rozzell, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Wildlife Mitigation Program Record of Decision.

Description: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has decided to adopt a set of Descriptions (goals, strategies, and procedural requirements) that apply to future BPA-funded wildlife mitigation projects. Various. sources-including Indian tribes, state agencies, property owners, private conservation groups, or other Federal agencies-propose wildlife mitigation projects to the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) for BPA funding. Following independent scientific and public reviews, Council then selects projects to recommend for BPA funding. BPA adopts this set of prescriptions to standardize the planning and implementation of individual wildlife mitigation projects. This decision is based on consideration of potential environmental impacts evaluated in BPA`s Wildlife Mitigation Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0246) published March, 20, 1997, and filed with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) the week of March 24, 1997 (EPA Notice of Availability Published April 4, 1997, 62 FR 65, 16154). BPA will distribute this Record of Decision to all known interested and affected persons, groups, tribes, and agencies.
Date: June 1, 1997
Creator: United States. Bonneville Power Administration.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department