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Indoor Radon and Its Decay Products: Concentrations, Causes, and Control Strategies

Description: This report is an introduction to the behavior of radon 222 and its decay products in indoor air. This includes review of basic characteristics of radon and its decay products and of features of the indoor environment itself, all of which factors affect behavior in indoor air. The experimental and theoretical evidence on behavior of radon and its decay products is examined, providing a basis for understanding the influence of geological, structural, and meteorological factors on indoor concentrations, as well as the effectiveness of control techniques. We go on to examine three important issues concerning indoor radon. We thus include (1) an appraisal of the concentration distribution in homes, (2) an examination of the utility and limitations of popular monitoring techniques and protocols, and (3) an assessment of the key elements of strategies for controlling radon levels in homes.
Date: January 1, 1990
Creator: Nero, A.V.; Gadgil, A.J.; Nazaroff, W.W. & Revzan, K.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Measurement of Radon, Thoron, Isotopic Uranium and Thorium to Determine Occupational and Environmental Exposure and Risk at Fernald Feed Material Production Center

Description: To develop a new and novel area and personal radon/thoron detector for both radon isotopes to better measure the exposure to low airborne concentrations of these gases at Fernald. These measurements are to be used to determine atmospheric dispersion and exposure to radon and thoron prior to and during retrieval and removal of the 4000 Ci of radium in the two silos at Fernald.
Date: July 1, 2004
Creator: Naomi H. Harley, Ph.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Influence of a Subslab Gravel Layer and Open Area on Soil-Gas and Radon Entry into Two Experimental Basements

Description: Measurements of steady-state soil-gas and {sup 222}Rn entry rates into two room-sized, experimental basement structures were made for a range of structure depressurizations (0-40 Pa) and open areas (0-165 x 10{sup -4} m{sup 2}). The structures are identical except that in one the floor slab lies directly on native soil whereas in the other the slab lies on a high permeability gravel layer. The subslab gravel layer greatly enhances the soil-gas and radon entry rate into the structure. The radon entry rate into the structure with the subslab gravel layer is four times greater than the entry rate into the structure without the gravel layer with an open area of 165 x 10{sup -4} m{sup 2}; the ratio increases to 30 for an open area of 5.0 x 10{sup -4} m{sup 2}. Although open area is a poor indicator of radon and soil-gas entry into the experimental structure, the extension of the soil-gas pressure field created by structure depressurization is a good measure of the radon entry rate into the experimental structures. The measured normalized radon entry rate into both structures has the same linear relationship with the average subslab pressure coupling regardless of open area. The average subslab pressure coupling is a measure of the extension of the soil-gas pressure field. A three-dimensional finite-difference model correctly predicts the effect of a subslab gravel layer, and different open area configurations on radon and soil-gas entry rate; however, the model underpredicts the absolute entry rates into both structures by a factor of 1.5.
Date: September 1, 1994
Creator: Robinson, Arthur L. & Sextro, R.G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Influence of a Subslab Gravel Layer and Open Area on Soil-Gas and Radon Entry into Two Experimental Basements

Description: Measurements of steady-state soil-gas and {sup 222}Rn entry rates into two room-sized, experimental basement structures were made for a range of structure depressurizations (0-40 Pa) and open floor areas (0-165 x 10{sup -4} m{sup 2}). The structures are identical except that in one the floor slab lies directly on native soil whereas in the other the slab lies on a high-permeability gravel layer. The subslab gravel layer greatly enhances the soil-gas and radon entry rate into the structure. The radon entry rate into the structure with the subslab gravel layer is four times greater than the entry rate into the structure without the gravel layer with an open floor area of 165 x 10{sup -4}m{sup 2}; however the ratio increases to 30 for an open floor area of 5.0 x 10{sup -4} m{sup 2}. The relationship between open area and soil-gas entry rate is complex. It depends on both the amount and distribution of the open area as well as the permeability of the soil near the opening. The entry rate into the experimental structures is largely determined by the presence or absence of a subslab gravel layer. Therefore open area is a poor indicator of radon and soil-gas entry into the structures. The extension of the soil-gas pressure field created by structure depressurization is a good measure of the radon entry. The measured normalized radon entry rate into both structures has the same linear relationship with the average subslab pressure coupling regardless of open area or the presence or absence of a subslab gravel layer. The average subslab pressure coupling is an estimate of the extension of the soil-gas pressure field. A three-dimensional finite-difference model correctly predicts the effect of a subslab gravel layer and different open area configurations on radon and soil-gas entry rate; however, the model underpredicts ...
Date: March 1, 1995
Creator: Robinson, Allen L. & Sextro, R.G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Convergence of conditional expectation operators and the compact range property

Description: The interplay between generalizations of Riezs' famous representation theorem and Radon-Nikodým type theorems has a long history. This paper will explore certain aspects of the theory of bounded linear operators on continuous function spaces, Radon-Nikodým type properties, and their connections.
Date: August 1992
Creator: Dawson, C. Bryan (Charles Bryan)
Partner: UNT Libraries

Radon in Soil Gas Above Bedrock Fracture Sets at the Shepley’s Hill Superfund Site

Description: The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) recently provided technical support for ongoing environmental remediation activities at the Shepley’s Hill remediation site near Devens, MA (Figure 1). The technical support was requested as follow-on work to an initial screening level radiation survey conducted in 2008. The purpose of the original study was to assess the efficacy of the INL-developed Backpack Sodium Iodide System (BaSIS) for detecting elevated areas of natural radioactivity due to the decay of radon-222 gases emanating from the underlying fracture sets. Although the results from the initial study were mixed, the BaSIS radiation surveys did confirm that exposed bedrock outcrops have higher natural radioactivity than the surficial soils, thus a high potential for detecting elevated levels of radon and/or radon daughter products. (INL 2009) The short count times associated with the BaSIS measurements limited the ability of the system to respond to elevated levels of radioactivity from a subsurface source, in this instance radon gas emanating from fracture sets. Thus, it was postulated that a different methodology be employed to directly detect the radon in the soil gases. The CR-39 particle track detectors were investigated through an extensive literature and technology search. The relatively long deployment or “detection” time of several days, as well as the sensitivity of the measurement and robustness of the detectors made the CR-39 technology promising for deployment at the Shepley’s Hill site.
Date: December 1, 2012
Creator: Giles, J.R.; McLing, T.L.; Carpenter, M.V.; Smith, C.J. & Brandon, W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A Method for Concurrent and Continuous Measurement of Rn-222 and Rn-220 Using Scintillation Cells

Description: A method is described for the continuous and simultaneous measurement of both {sup 220}Rn and {sup 222}Rn in air. Two scintillation flasks are arranged in a serial configuration and the concentrations of {sup 222}Rn and {sup 220}Rn are determined by making use of the difference between the half-lives of the two radon isotopes. The method was developed for directly measuring {sup 220}Rn in occupied areas where fuel materials containing {sup 228}Th were being used, but could also be useful for other applications. Since {sup 222}Rn is usually present from either naturally occurring materials or due to the presence of process material, the method was designed to allow measurement of the two isotopes at coincident times. The method is discussed for counting equipment using scintillation cells, but the approach would also be directly applicable for any type of pulse-counting radon monitoring equipment such as pulse-ion chambers. Although intermittent measurements with decay correction could be performed using a single detector, the use of two cells allows continuous monitoring and a higher degree of detection sensitivity. The approach makes use of isotope-independent calibration factors and could therefore easily be modified for use with a single detector when only one of the radon isotopes is expected to be present.
Date: January 31, 2002
Creator: Coleman, R.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A TIME-DEPENDENT METHOD FOR CHARACTERIZING THE DIFFUSION OF RADON-222 IN CONCRETE

Description: The porosity and diffusion length of concrete have been determined by measuring the time-dependent diffusion of radon through a thin slab of the material, One surface of the slab is exposed to a large, fixed radon concentration beginning at t=0. The radon that diffuses out of a portion of the opposite surface is collected during several contiguous time intervals. The total activity collected over a set of intervals beginning at t=0 and the steady-state flux of activity are used to calculate the porosity and diffusion length, As a test of these parameters, they are then used to predict the activity collected during other time intervals and for other sample thicknesses, Samples from two types of concrete were tested: one type yielded a porosity of 0.068 and a diffusion length of 12.6 cm; the respective values for the other were 0.32 and 16.9 cm. The predicted and experimental results agreed well, thereby verifying the assumption that concrete may be treated as a homogenous diffusion medium for radon.
Date: July 1, 1981
Creator: Zapalac, Geordie H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

New Methods of Energy Efficient Radon Mitigation

Description: Two new radon mitigation techniques are introduced and their evaluation in a field study complemented by numerical model predictions is described. Based on numerical predictions, installation of a sub gravel membrane at the study site resulted in a factor of two reduction in indoor radon concentrations. Experimental data indicated that installation of 'short-circuit' pipes extending between the subslab gravel and outdoors, caused an additional factor of two decrease in the radon concentration. Consequently, the combination of these two passive radon mitigation features, called the membrane and short-circuit (MASC) technique, was associated with a factor of four reduction in indoor radon concentration. The energy-efficient active radon mitigation method, called efficient active subslab pressurization (EASP), required only 20% of the fan energy of conventional active subslab depressurization and reduced the indoor radon concentration by approximately a factor of 15, including the numerically-predicted impact of the sub-gravel membrane.
Date: May 1, 1994
Creator: Fisk, W.J.; Prill, R.J.; Wooley, J.; Bonnefous, Y.C.; Gadgil, A.J. & Riley, W.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Predicting New Hampshire Indoor Radon Concentrations from geologic information and other covariates

Description: Generalized geologic province information and data on house construction were used to predict indoor radon concentrations in New Hampshire (NH). A mixed-effects regression model was used to predict the geometric mean (GM) short-term radon concentrations in 259 NH towns. Bayesian methods were used to avoid over-fitting and to minimize the effects of small sample variation within towns. Data from a random survey of short-term radon measurements, individual residence building characteristics, along with geologic unit information, and average surface radium concentration by town, were variables used in the model. Predicted town GM short-term indoor radon concentrations for detached houses with usable basements range from 34 Bq/m{sup 3} (1 pCi/l) to 558 Bq/m{sup 3} (15 pCi/l), with uncertainties of about 30%. A geologic province consisting of glacial deposits and marine sediments, was associated with significantly elevated radon levels, after adjustment for radium concentration, and building type. Validation and interpretation of results are discussed.
Date: May 1, 1998
Creator: Apte, M.G.; Price, P.N.; Nero, A.V. & Revzan, K.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Bayesian Prediction of Mean Indoor Radon Concentrations for Minnesota Counties

Description: Past efforts to identify areas having higher than average indoor radon concentrations by examining the statistical relationship between local mean concentrations and physical parameters such as the soil radium concentration have been hampered by the noise in local means caused by the small number of homes monitored in some or most areas, In the present paper, indoor radon data from a survey in Minnesota are analyzed in such a way as to minimize the effect of finite sample size within counties, in order to determine the true county-to-county variation of indoor radon concentrations in the state and the extent to which this variation is explained by the variation in surficial radium concentration among counties, The analysis uses hierarchical modeling, in which some parameters of interest (such as county geometric mean (GM) radon concentrations) are assumed to be drawn from a single population, for which the distributional parameters are estimated from the data. Extensions of this technique, known as a random effects regression and mixed effects regression, are used to determine the relationship between predictive variables and indoor radon concentrations; the results are used to refine the predictions of each county's radon levels, resulting in a great decrease in uncertainty. The true county-to-county variation of GM radon levels is found to be substantially less than the county-to-county variation of the observed GMs, much of which is due to the small sample size in each county. The variation in the logarithm of surficial radium content is shown to explain approximately 80% of the variation of the logarithm of GM radon concentration among counties. The influences of housing and measurement factors, such as whether the monitored home has a basement and whether the measurement was made in a basement, are also discussed. This approach offers a self-consistent statistical method for predicting the mean ...
Date: August 1, 1995
Creator: Price, P.N.; Nero, A.V. & Gelman, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Bayesian Prediction of Mean Indoor Radon Concentrations for Minnesota Counties

Description: Past efforts to identify areas with higher than average indoor radon concentrations by examining the statistical relationship between local mean concentrations and physical parameters such as the soil radium concentration have been hampered by the variation in local means caused by the small number of homes monitored in most areas. In this paper, indoor radon data from a survey in Minnesota are analyzed to minimize the effect of finite sample size within counties, to determine the true county-to-county variation of indoor radon concentrations in the state, and to find the extent to which this variation is explained by the variation in surficial radium concentration among counties. The analysis uses hierarchical modeling, in which some parameters of interest (such as county geometric mean (GM) radon concentrations) are assumed to be drawn from a single population, for which the distributional parameters are estimated from the data. Extensions of this technique, known as a random effects regression and mixed effects regression, are used to determine the relationship between predictive variables and indoor radon concentrations; the results are used to refine the predictions of each county's radon levels, resulting in a great decrease in uncertainty. The true county-to-county variation of GM radon levels is found to be substantially less than the county-to-county variation of the observed GMs, much of which is due to the small sample size in each county. The variation in the logarithm of surficial radium content is shown to explain approximately 80% of the variation of the logarithm of GM radon concentration among counties. The influences of housing and measurement factors, such as whether the monitored home has a basement and whether the measurement was made in a basement, are also discussed. The statistical method can be used to predict mean radon concentrations, or applied to other geographically distributed environmental parameters.
Date: February 1, 1996
Creator: Price, P.N.; Nero, A.V. & Gelman, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Comparison of Ambient Radon Concentrations in Air in the Northern Mojave Desert from Continuous and Integrating Instruments

Description: As part of a program to characterize and baseline environmental parameters, ambient radon-222 (Rn) monitoring was conducted in the rural community of Amargosa Valley, NV, the closest community to Yucca Mountain. Passive integrating and continuous Rn monitoring instruments were deployed adjacent to the Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) station in Amargosa Valley. The CEMP station provided real-time ambient gamma exposure and meteorological data used to correct the integrated Rn measurements, verified the meteorological data collected by the continuous Rn monitoring instrument, and for provided instrumentation for evaluating the relationships between meteorological conditions and Rn concentrations. Hourly Rn concentrations in air measured by the continuous Rn monitoring instrument (AlphaGUARD®) were compared to the average hourly values for the integrating Rn measurements (E-PERM®) by dividing the total Rn measurements by the number of hours the instruments were deployed. The results of the comparison indicated that average hourly ambient Rn concentrations as measured by both methods ranged from 0.2 to 0.4 pico-curies per liter of air. Ambient Rn values for the AlphaGUARD exhibited diurnal variations. When Rn concentrations were compared with measurements of temperature (T), barometric pressure, and relative humidity, the correlation (inversely) was highest with T, albeit weakly.
Date: May 18, 2010
Creator: Shafer, David S.; McGraw, David; Karr, Lynn H.; McCurdy, Greg; Kluesner, Tammy L.; Gray, Karen J. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Wind-induced Ground-surface Pressures Around a Single-Family House

Description: Wind induces a ground-surface pressure field around a building that can substantially affect the flow of soil gas and thereby the entry of radon and other soil-gas contaminants into the building. To quantify the effect of the wind-induced groundsurface pressure field on contaminant entry rates, the mean ground-surface pressure field was experimentally measured in a wind tunnel for several incidence angles of the wind, two atmospheric boundary layers, and two house geometries. The experimentally measured ground-surface pressure fields are compared with those predicted by a k-e turbulence model. Despite the fundamental limitations in applying a k-e model to a system with flow separation, predictions from the numerical simulations were good for the two wind incidence angles tested.
Date: February 1, 1996
Creator: Riley, W.J.; Gadgil, A.J. & Nazaroff, W.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Final Report: Radon: Gas Transport in Soils and its Relation Toradon Availability: Hot Spot Identification and Flow Characteristics Near Structures, May 1, 1996 - September 30, 1997

Description: There were 3 major objectives being addressed in this research. The first was to coordinate ground-truth quality assurance in the DOE/LBL/EPA cooperative study to determine a methodology to predict the areas where indoor radon concentrations have the highest probability of exceeding 20 pCi/L (750 Bq/md). the second was to examine 2 common types of homes (basement and non-basement) for yearly radon variation by monitoring specific parameters under normal living conditions. The third task was to develop a rapid field method to determine the thoron (Rn-220) content of soils that would complement the rapid method of Rn-222 content that was earlier developed under this proposal.
Date: September 30, 1997
Creator: Olsen, Curtis
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Effect of Steady Winds on Radon-222 Entry from soil into houses

Description: Wind affects the radon-222 entry rate from soil into buildings and the resulting indoor concentrations. To investigate this phenomenon, we employ a previously tested three-dimensional numerical model of soil-gas Bow around houses, a commercial computational fluid dynamics code, an established model for determining ventilation rates in the presence of wind, and new wind tunnel results for the ground-surface pressure field caused by wind. These tools and data, applied under steady-state conditions to a prototypical residential building, allow us (1) to determine the complex soil-gas flow patterns that result from the presence of wind-generated ground-surface pressures, (2) to evaluate the effect of these flows on the radon concentration in the soil, and (3) to calculate the effect of wind on the radon entry rate and indoor concentration. For a broad range of soil permeabilities, two wind speeds, and two wind directions, we quantify the"flushing" effect of wind on the radon in the soil surrounding a house, and the consequent sharp decrease in radon entry rates. Experimental measurements of the time-dependent radon concentration in soil gas beneath houses confirm the existence of wind-induced flushing. Comparisons are made to modeling predictions obtained while ignoring the effect of the wind-generated ground-surface pressures. These investigations lead to the conclusion that wind-generated ground-surface pressures play a significant role in determining radon entry rates into residential buildings. [References: 26]
Date: October 1, 1994
Creator: Riley, W.J.; Gadgil, A.J.; Bonnefous, Y.C. & Nazaroff, W.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Estimating large-scale fractured rock properties from radon data collected in a ventilated tunnel

Description: To address regulatory issues regarding worker safety, radon gas concentrations have been monitored as part of the operation of a deep tunnel excavated from a highly fractured tuff formation. The objective of this study was to examine the potential use of the radon data to estimate large-scale formation properties of fractured rock. An iTOUGH2 model was developed to predict radon concentrations for prescribed ventilation rates. The numerical model was used (1) to estimate the permeability and porosity of the fractured formation at the length scale of the tunnel and extending tens of meters into the surrounding rock, and (2) to understand the mechanism leading to radon concentrations that potentially exceed the regulatory limit. The mechanism controlling radon concentrations in the tunnel is a function of atmospheric barometric fluctuations propagated down the tunnel. In addition, a slight suction is induced by the ventilation system. The pressure fluctuations are dampened in the fractured formation according to its permeability and porosity. Consequently, as the barometric pressure in the tunnel drops, formation gases from the rock are pulled into the opening, resulting in high radon concentrations. Model calibration to both radon concentration data measured in the tunnel and gas phase pressure fluctuations observed in the formation yielded independent estimates of effective, large-scale fracture permeability and porosity. The calibrated model was then used as a design tool to predict the effect of adjusting the ventilation-system operation strategy for reducing the probability that radon gas concentrations will exceed the regulatory limit.
Date: May 12, 2003
Creator: Unger, Andre; Finsterle, Stefan & Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Attenuated Vector Tomography -- An Approach to Image Flow Vector Fields with Doppler Ultrasonic Imaging

Description: The measurement of flow obtained using continuous wave Doppler ultrasound is formulated as a directional projection of a flow vector field. When a continuous ultrasound wave bounces against a flowing particle, a signal is backscattered. This signal obtains a Doppler frequency shift proportional to the speed of the particle along the ultrasound beam. This occurs for each particle along the beam, giving rise to a Doppler velocity spectrum. The first moment of the spectrum provides the directional projection of the flow along theultrasound beam. Signals reflected from points further away from the detector will have lower amplitude than signals reflected from points closer to the detector. The effect is very much akin to that modeled by the attenuated Radon transform in emission computed tomography.A least-squares method was adopted to reconstruct a 2D vector field from directional projection measurements. Attenuated projections of only the longitudinal projections of the vector field were simulated. The components of the vector field were reconstructed using the gradient algorithm to minimize a least-squares criterion. This result was compared with the reconstruction of longitudinal projections of the vector field without attenuation. Ifattenuation is known, the algorithm was able to accurately reconstruct both components of the full vector field from only one set of directional projection measurements. A better reconstruction was obtained with attenuation than without attenuation implying that attenuation provides important information for the reconstruction of flow vector fields.This confirms previous work where we showed that knowledge of the attenuation distribution helps in the reconstruction of MRI diffusion tensor fields from fewer than the required measurements. In the application of ultrasound the attenuation distribution is obtained with pulse wave transmission computed tomography and flow information is obtained with continuous wave Doppler.
Date: May 15, 2008
Creator: Huang, Qiu; Peng, Qiyu; Huang, Bin; Cheryauka, Arvi & Gullberg, Grant T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fernald radon stack monitor user`s guide

Description: The stack monitor uses long-range alpha detection (LRAD) technology for the measurement of radon levels in the stack emissions. The basic principle behind LRAD is the collection of ions created in air through the energy loss mechanisms of decay alphas. This is accomplished by establishing an electric field in the region where alpha decays will occur, and directing the ions via the field onto a biased plate. Accumulation of charge on the plate results in a current in the biasing circuit which can be read with a sensitive electrometer. In electrostatic LRAD designs, the linearity of the measured current with gross alpha activity is well-established. In order to determine radon-222 levels in the presence of other radon isotopes, it is necessary to perform some type of isotopic analysis on the stack samples. In the present case, other radon isotopes of possible concern are radon-219, which occurs in the decay chain of uranium-235, and radon-220, found in the decay chain of thorium-232. Radon-219, with a half-life of four seconds, presents no difficulty for the situation in which emanations from the vitrification process undergo as little as one minute of delay before release into the stack. For example, an initial concentration of 200,000 pCi/l of radon-219 decays to 5 pCi/l in one minute. Radon-220, however, has a half-life of about 55 seconds. If initially present in a substantial ratio to radon-222, a radon gross-alpha measurement on stack emissions would have a significant error if used as a measure for radon-222, even with many minutes of processing delay before the sample was taken.
Date: January 1, 1997
Creator: Whitley, C.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Spectroscopy of reflection-asymmetric nuclei using multinucleon transfer reactions

Description: The heavy-ion collisions of {sup 56}Fe + {sup 232}Th, {sup 86}Kr + {sup 232}Th and {sup 136Xe} + {sup 232}Th with beam energies 15--20% above the Coulomb barrier were used to populate nuclei in the light-actinide region. Yield distributions of the binary reaction products stopped in thick targets were obtained by measuring {gamma}-{gamma} coincidence intensities. The {sup 136}Xe + {sup 232}Th reaction was repeated at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory using a recent implementation of the GAMMASPHERE array. Many interesting discoveries concerning the high-spin structure of octupole-deformed light-actinide nuclei have been made.
Date: December 1, 1996
Creator: Cocks, J.F.C.; Butler, P.A. & Cann, K.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Attachment of radon progeny to cigarette-smoke aerosols

Description: The daughter products of radon gas are now recognized as a significant contributor to radiation exposure to the general public. It is also suspected that a synergistic effect exists with the combination cigarette smoking and radon exposure. We have conducted an experimental investigation to determine the physical nature of radon progeny interactions with cigarette smoke aerosols. The size distributions of the aerosols are characterized and attachment rates of radon progeny to cigarette-smoke aerosols are determined. Both the mainstream and sidestream portions of the smoke aerosol are investigated. Unattached radon progeny are very mobile and, in the presence of aerosols, readily attach to the particle surfaces. In this study, an aerosol chamber is used to contain the radon gas, progeny and aerosol mixture while allowing the attachment process to occur. The rate of attachment is dependent on the size distribution, or diffusion coefficient, of the radon progeny as well as the aerosol size distribution. The size distribution of the radon daughter products is monitored using a graded-screen diffusion battery. The diffusion battery also enables separation of the unattached radon progeny from those attached to the aerosol particles. Analysis of the radon decay products is accomplished using alpha spectrometry. The aerosols of interest are size fractionated with the aid of a differential mobility analyzer and cascade impactor. The measured attachment rates of progeny to the cigarette smoke are compared to those found in similar experiments using an ambient aerosol. The lowest attachment coefficients observed, {approximately}10{sup {minus}6} cm{sup 3}/s, occurred for the ambient aerosol. The sidestream and mainstream smoke aerosols exhibited higher attachment rates in that order. The results compared favorably with theories describing the coagulation process of aerosols.
Date: May 1, 1995
Creator: Biermann, A.H. & Sawyer, S.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department