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Relation Between Dual Acidity and Structure of H-Montmorillonite

Description: The following report covers potentiometric studies with hydrogen-sensitive and cation-sensitive glass electrodes supplemented by chemical determinations and X-ray diffractions on a hydrogen-montmorillonite. These studies indicate that the clay behaves as a mixture of two acids, resulting from the presence of interlayer and edge exchange sites, both occupied by hydrogen ions.
Date: March 1962
Creator: Pommer, Alfred M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Organic Solutes in Ground Water at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

Description: From purpose of study: In January 1980, the u.s. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recommended that a ground-water monitoring program for organic constituents be started at the INEL. In response to this recommendation, DOE requested the U.S. Geological Survey to undertake such a program. The purpose of the study was to determine the distribution and extent of organic constituents in the ground water beneath the INEL.
Date: March 1982
Creator: Leenheer, Jerry A. & Bagby, Jefferson C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Incineration of Radioactive Solid Wastes: A Report to the General Manager's Task Force on AEC Operational Radioactive Waste Management

Description: From summary and conclusions: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the possibilities and extent to which incineration could be used to decrease the volume and increase the safety of handling and storing the combustible, radioactive solid wastes.
Date: August 1970
Creator: U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. Working Group for Incineration.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Civilian Nuclear Waste Disposal

Description: The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA) calls for disposal of spent nuclear fuel in a deep geologic repository that is unlikely to be disturbed for thousands of years. Low-level waste sites are a state responsibility under the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980. Pursuant to that act, 10 regional compacts for disposal of low level waste have been approved by Congress. Three commercial low-level waste sites are currently operating, in the states of South Carolina, Utah, and Washington.
Date: August 8, 2006
Creator: Holt, Mark
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Civilian Nuclear Waste Disposal

Description: The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA) calls for disposal of spent nuclear fuel in a deep geologic repository that is unlikely to be disturbed for thousands of years. Low-level waste sites are a state responsibility under the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980. Pursuant to that act, 10 regional compacts for disposal of low level waste have been approved by Congress. Three commercial low-level waste sites are currently operating, in the states of South Carolina, Utah, and Washington.
Date: January 29, 2003
Creator: Holt, Mark
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Civilian Nuclear Waste Disposal

Description: The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA) calls for disposal of spent nuclear fuel in a deep geologic repository that is unlikely to be disturbed for thousands of years. Low-level waste sites are a state responsibility under the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980. Pursuant to that act, 10 regional compacts for disposal of low level waste have been approved by Congress. Three commercial low-level waste sites are currently operating, in the states of South Carolina, Utah, and Washington.
Date: March 17, 2003
Creator: Holt, Mark
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Civilian Nuclear Waste Disposal

Description: The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA) calls for disposal of spent nuclear fuel in a deep geologic repository that is unlikely to be disturbed for thousands of years. Low-level waste sites are a state responsibility under the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980. Pursuant to that act, 10 regional compacts for disposal of low level waste have been approved by Congress. Three commercial low-level waste sites are currently operating, in the states of South Carolina, Utah, and Washington.
Date: May 8, 2003
Creator: Holt, Mark
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Civilian Nuclear Waste Disposal

Description: The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA) calls for disposal of spent nuclear fuel in a deep geologic repository that is unlikely to be disturbed for thousands of years. Low-level waste sites are a state responsibility under the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980. Pursuant to that act, 10 regional compacts for disposal of low level waste have been approved by Congress. Three commercial low-level waste sites are currently operating, in the states of South Carolina, Utah, and Washington.
Date: June 27, 2003
Creator: Holt, Mark
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Civilian Nuclear Waste Disposal

Description: The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA) calls for disposal of spent nuclear fuel in a deep geologic repository that is unlikely to be disturbed for thousands of years. Low-level waste sites are a state responsibility under the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980. Pursuant to that act, 10 regional compacts for disposal of low level waste have been approved by Congress. Three commercial low-level waste sites are currently operating, in the states of South Carolina, Utah, and Washington.
Date: August 6, 2003
Creator: Holt, Mark
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Civilian Nuclear Waste Disposal

Description: The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA) calls for disposal of spent nuclear fuel in a deep geologic repository that is unlikely to be disturbed for thousands of years. Low-level waste sites are a state responsibility under the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980. Pursuant to that act, 10 regional compacts for disposal of low level waste have been approved by Congress. Three commercial low-level waste sites are currently operating, in the states of South Carolina, Utah, and Washington.
Date: September 15, 2003
Creator: Holt, Mark
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Civilian Nuclear Waste Disposal

Description: The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA) calls for disposal of spent nuclear fuel in a deep geologic repository that is unlikely to be disturbed for thousands of years. Low-level waste sites are a state responsibility under the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980. Pursuant to that act, 10 regional compacts for disposal of low level waste have been approved by Congress. Three commercial low-level waste sites are currently operating, in the states of South Carolina, Utah, and Washington.
Date: January 21, 2005
Creator: Holt, Mark
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Civilian Nuclear Waste Disposal

Description: The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA) calls for disposal of spent nuclear fuel in a deep geologic repository that is unlikely to be disturbed for thousands of years. Low-level waste sites are a state responsibility under the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980. Pursuant to that act, 10 regional compacts for disposal of low level waste have been approved by Congress. Three commercial low-level waste sites are currently operating, in the states of South Carolina, Utah, and Washington.
Date: June 5, 2002
Creator: Holt, Mark
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Civilian Nuclear Waste Disposal

Description: The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA) calls for disposal of spent nuclear fuel in a deep geologic repository that is unlikely to be disturbed for thousands of years. Low-level waste sites are a state responsibility under the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980. Pursuant to that act, 10 regional compacts for disposal of low level waste have been approved by Congress. Three commercial low-level waste sites are currently operating, in the states of South Carolina, Utah, and Washington.
Date: July 8, 2002
Creator: Holt, Mark
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Civilian Nuclear Waste Disposal

Description: The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA) calls for disposal of spent nuclear fuel in a deep geologic repository that is unlikely to be disturbed for thousands of years. Low-level waste sites are a state responsibility under the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980. Pursuant to that act, 10 regional compacts for disposal of low level waste have been approved by Congress. Three commercial low-level waste sites are currently operating, in the states of South Carolina, Utah, and Washington.
Date: September 9, 2002
Creator: Holt, Mark
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Civilian Nuclear Waste Disposal

Description: The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA) calls for disposal of spent nuclear fuel in a deep geologic repository that is unlikely to be disturbed for thousands of years. Low-level waste sites are a state responsibility under the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980. Pursuant to that act, 10 regional compacts for disposal of low level waste have been approved by Congress. Three commercial low-level waste sites are currently operating, in the states of South Carolina, Utah, and Washington.
Date: December 16, 2002
Creator: Holt, Mark
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Solubility of Tributyl Phosphate in Aqueous Solutions

Description: Report describing a study regarding the solubility and related properties of tributyl phosphate (TBP), which has lower solubility in water than most uranium solvents. Pure TBP and TBP in an inert diluent were tested for solubility in water, several nitric acid solutions of varying concentrations, and other solutions typical of process streams. For TBP-diluent-water system tests, equilibrium water content in organic phase was found.
Date: April 2, 1951
Creator: Burger, Leland L. & Forsman, R. C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nuclear Weapons: Disposal Options for Surplus Weapons-Usable Plutonium

Description: With the end of the Cold War, the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaties (START), and other agreements, the United States and Russia have dramatically reduced their arsenals of nuclear weapons. As a result, each side has accumulated large stockpiles of plutonium, one of the principal materials used in nuclear warheads. The United States recently declared a holding of approximately 50 metric tons of weapons-usable plutonium excess to military needs. Even greater levels are believed to exist in Russia.
Date: May 22, 1997
Creator: Johnson, Craig M. & Davis, Zachary S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

High-Level Nuclear Waste Disposal - A Fact Sheet

Description: The Federal government's high-level waste disposal program is designed to build a permanent repository for highly radioactive waste from nuclear power plants and defense facilities. The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA) created an office in the Department of Energy (DOE) to develop this repository, to be paid for by a fee on nuclear-generated electricity.
Date: November 4, 1993
Creator: Holt, Mark
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Removal of Radioisotopes From Solution by Earth Materials From Eastern Idaho

Description: Abstract: Naturally occurring earth materials from Idaho, primarily from localities near the National Reactor Testing Station (NRTS), were used in laboratory tests for the removal of radioisotopes from aqueous solutions. These earth materials included lignitic deposits, clay-like materials, and specific minerals; ion exchange resins were also considered for a specific application. The aqueous solutions were low-level radioactive cooling water or synthetic solutions made up to represent low-level radioactive wastes at the NRTS. Cation exchange capacities and other properties which affect the removal of radioisotopes from solution were determined the cation exchange capacities varied from 0.006 to 1.0 meq/g of solid. Earth materials with cation exchange capacities greater than 0.3 meq/g, in general, had distribution coefficients in excess of 1000. The highest distribution coefficients for cesium and strontium occurred in the pH range from 6.0 to 9.0 The possible use of these materials for decontaminating low-level radioactive waste at the NRTS is discussed. The result of laboratory studies using these materials and an organic ion exchange resign for decontaminating a specific NRTS waste are given. A material high in clinoptilolite from a location near the NRTS was considered to be the most promising material for use in large beds or ion exchange-type columns.
Date: April 1964
Creator: Wilding, M. W. & Rhodes, D. W. (Donald Walter), 1919-
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department