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Diversity of Decline-Rate-Corrected Type 1a Supernova Rise times:One Mode or Two?

Description: B-band light-curve rise times for eight unusually well-observed nearby Type Ia supernova (SNe) are fitted by a newly developed template-building algorithm, using light-curve functions that are smooth, flexible, and free of potential bias from externally derived templates and other prior assumptions. From the available literature, photometric BVRI data collected over many months, including the earliest points, are reconciled, combined, and fitted to a unique time of explosion for each SN. On average, after they are corrected for light-curve decline rate, three SNe rise in 18.81 {+-} 0.36 days, while five SNe rise in 16.64 {+-} 0.21 days. If all eight SNe are sampled from a single parent population (a hypothesis not favored by statistical tests), the rms intrinsic scatter of the decline-rate-corrected SN rise time is 0.96{sub -0.25}{sup +0.52} days--a first measurement of this dispersion. The corresponding global mean rise time is 17.44 {+-} 0.39 days, where the uncertainty is dominated by intrinsic variance. This value is {approx}2 days shorter than two published averages that nominally are twice as precise, though also based on small samples. When comparing high-z to low-z SN luminosities for determining cosmological parameters, bias can be introduced by use of a light-curve template with an unrealistic rise time. If the period over which light curves are sampled depends on z in a manner typical of current search and measurement strategies, a two-day discrepancy in template rise time can bias the luminosity comparison by {approx}0.03 magnitudes.
Date: May 1, 2007
Creator: Strovink, Mark
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Multi-channel optical pyrometer for sub-nanosecond temperature measurements at NDCX-I/II

Description: We present a detailed technical description of a fast multi-channel pyrometer designed for warm-dense-matter (WDM) experiments with intense heavy ion beams at the neutralized-drift-compression-experiment linear accelerator (NDCX-I/II) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The unique features of the described instrument are its sub-nanosecond temporal resolution (100 ps rise-time) and a broad range, 1,500 K - 12,000 K of measurable brightness temperatures in the visible and near-infrared regions of the spectrum. The working scheme, calibration procedure, experimental data obtained with the pyrometer and future applications are presented.
Date: April 13, 2011
Creator: Ni, P.A.; Bieniosek, F.M. & Waldron, W.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

NOTE ON TRANSISTORS FOR AVALANCHE-MODE OPERATION

Description: We have found that selected Motorola transistors of the MM-486, MM-487, and MM-488 type are quite useful for avalanche-mode operation. Figure 1 shows a circuit used in conjunction with a traveling-wave oscilloscope for selecting avalanche units. The output of the line-type pulse generator is 40 to 60 volts (either polarity of output pulse is available), and the rise time is less than 0.5 nsec. Figure Z shows a plot of the static V-I characteristics of the collector-to-emitter junction for various units, avalanching and nonavalanching. A transistor that avalanches will do 80 over the entire flat portion of the V-I characteristic. One can expect that 10 to 30% of the transistors will avalanche. There is some indication that the low-beta type (MM-486) give the best yield. There is a time delay of a few nanoseconds between application of a trigger pulse and the rise of the main avalanche current. Figures 3 and 4 shows this delay, measured between the 50% point of the trigger-voltage waveform and the 50% point of the avalanche output waveform, as a function of trigger-voltage amplitude (Fig. 3) and static-collector current (Fig. 4). The negative-resistance region (such as that in Fig. 2) should be avoided if time and amplitude jitter of the output pulse are to be minimized. A temperature change from 70 to 150 F has negligible effect on time delay, but raises the breakdown knee (Fig. 2) to higher current (e. g., from 2 x 10{sup -3} to 8 x 10{sup -3} {micro}a).
Date: March 1, 1962
Creator: Miller, Harold W. & Kerns, Quentin A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

High pressure, quasi-isentropic compression experiments on the Omega laser

Description: The high energy density of pulsed lasers can be used to generate shockless loading in solids to high pressures and compressions but low temperatures. We have used the Omega laser to extend the capabilities of this technique to multi-Mbar pressures and compressions approaching a factor of 2 in aluminum foils. The energy from a 3.7 ns laser pulse is used to drive a strong shock through a 200 {micro}m polystyrene disc. The disc material unloads from a high-pressure state and expands across a 300 {micro}m vacuum gap where it stagnates against the sample to produce a smooth, monotonically increasing load with rise times from a few to {approx} 20 ns. Ramped compression reasing waves having peak pressures of 14-200 GPa (0.14-2.0 Mbar) and peak compressions {rho}/{rho}{sub 0} of 1.1-2.0 were generated in the aluminum samples using laser pulse energies of 400 J to 2 kJ. Wave profiles from a series of successively thicker targets loaded to 120 GPa show the evolution of the high-pressure compression wave within the sample. The initial loading in the sample is shockless, and develops into a shock at a depth of 20-25 {micro}m. We compare these wave profiles with hydrodynamic simulations from which we extract material temperatures and plastic strain rates behind the compression wave. Limitations and future prospects for this new shockless loading technique are discussed.
Date: May 26, 2006
Creator: Lorenz, K; Edwards, M; Jankowski, A; Pollaine, S; Smith, R & Remington, B
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Hybrid MOSFET/Driver for Ultra-Fast Switching

Description: The ultra-fast switching of power MOSFETs, in about 1ns, is very challenging. This is largely due to the parasitic inductance that is intrinsic to commercial packages used for both MOSFETs and drivers. Parasitic gate and source inductance not only limit the voltage rise time on the MOSFET internal gate structure but can also cause the gate voltage to oscillate. This paper describes a hybrid approach that substantially reduces the parasitic inductance between the driver and MOSFET gate, as well as between the MOSFET source and its external connection. A flip chip assembly is used to directly attach a die-form power MOSFET and driver on a PCB. The parasitic inductances are significantly reduced by eliminating bond wires and minimizing lead length. The experimental results demonstrate ultra-fast switching of the power MOSFET with excellent control of the gate-source voltage.
Date: July 14, 2009
Creator: Tang, T
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Advanced Helical Generator

Description: A high explosive pulsed power (HEPP) generator called the Advanced Helical Generator (AHG) has been designed, built, and successfully tested. The AHG incorporates design principles of voltage and current management to obtain a high current and energy gain. Its design was facilitated by the use of modern modeling tools as well as high precision manufacture. The result was a first-shot success. The AHG delivered 16 Mega-Amperes of current and 11 Mega-Joules of energy to a quasi-static 80 nH inductive load. A current gain of 154 times was obtained with a peak exponential rise time of 20 {micro}s. We will describe in detail the design and testing of the AHG.
Date: October 26, 2009
Creator: Reisman, D B; Javedani, J B; Ellsworth, G F; Kuklo, R M; Goerz, D A; White, A D et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Hybrid MOSFET/Driver for Ultra-Fast Switching

Description: The ultra-fast switching of power MOSFETs, in {approx}1ns, is very challenging. This is largely due to the parasitic inductance that is intrinsic to commercial packages used for both MOSFETs and drivers. Parasitic gate and source inductance not only limit the voltage rise time on the MOSFET internal gate structure but can also cause the gate voltage to oscillate. This paper describes a hybrid approach that substantially reduces the parasitic inductance between the driver and MOSFET gate as well as between the MOSFET source and its external connection. A flip chip assembly is used to directly attach the die-form power MOSFET and driver on a PCB. The parasitic inductances are significantly reduced by eliminating bond wires and minimizing lead length. The experimental results demonstrate ultra-fast switching of the power MOSFET with excellent control of the gate-source voltage.
Date: July 11, 2008
Creator: Tang, T. & Burkhart, C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Inner-shell photoionized x-ray lasers

Description: The inner-shell photoionized x-ray lasing scheme is an attractive method for achieving x-ray lasing at short wavelengths, via population inversion following inner-shell photoionization (ISPI). This scheme promises both a short wavelength and a short pulse source of coherent x rays with high average power. In this dissertation a very complete study of the ISPI x-ray laser scheme is done concerning target structure, filter design and lasant medium. An investigation of the rapid rise time of x-ray emission from targets heated by an ultra-short pulse high-intensity optical laser was conducted for use as the x-ray source for ISPI x-ray lasing. Lasing by this approach in C at a wavelength of 45 {angstrom} requires a short pulse (about 50 fsec) driving optical laser with an energy of 1-5 J and traveling wave optics with an accuracy of {approximately} 15 {micro}m. The optical laser is incident on a high-Z target creating a high-density plasma which emits a broadband spectrum of x rays. This x-ray source is passed through a filter to eliminate the low-energy x rays. The remaining high-energy x rays preferentially photoionize inner-shell electrons resulting in a population inversion. Inner-shell photoionized x-ray lasing relies on the large energy of a K-{alpha} transition in the initially neutral lasant. The photo energy required to pump this scheme is only slightly greater than the photon energy of the lasing transition yielding a lasing scheme with high quantum efficiency. However, the overall efficiency is reduced due to low x-ray conversion efficiency and the large probability of Auger decay yielding an overall efficiency of {approximately} 10{sup {minus}7} resulting in an output energy of {micro}J's. They calculate that a driving laser with a pulse duration of 40 fs, a 10{micro}m x 1 cm line focus, and an energy of 1 J gives an effective gain length product (gl) ...
Date: June 1, 1998
Creator: Moon, S.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Photoconductive Semiconductor Switch Technology for Short Pulse Electromagnetics and Lasers

Description: High gain photoconductive semiconductor switches (PCSS) are being used to produce high power electromagnetic pulses foc (1) compact, repetitive accelerators, (2) ultra-wide band impulse sources, (3) precision gas switch triggers, (4) optically-activated firesets, and (5) high power optical pulse generation and control. High power, sub-nanosecond optical pulses are used for active optical sensors such as compact optical radars and range-gated hallistic imaging systems. Following a brief introduction to high gain PCSS and its general applications, this paper will focus on PCSS for optical pulse generation and control. PCSS technology can be employed in three distinct approaches to optical pulse generation and control: (1) short pulse carrier injection to induce gain-switching in semiconductor lasers, (2) electro-optical Q-switching, and (3) optically activated Q-switching. The most significant PCSS issues for these applications are switch rise time, jitter, and longevity. This paper will describe both the requirements of these applications and the most recent results from PCSS technology. Experiments to understand and expand the limitations of high gain PCSS will also be described.
Date: August 5, 1999
Creator: Denison, Gary J.; Helgeson, Wesley D.; Hjalmarson, Harold P.; Loubriel, Guillermo M.; Mar, Alan; O'Malley, Martin W. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

New approach to jitter reduction of an x-ray streak camera in accumulation mode.

Description: An x-ray streak camera operating in accumulation mode was developed for studying ultrafast dynamics at synchrotron facilities. A laser-triggered photoconductive switch was used as a sweeping unit to obtain low timing jitter. The fast rise time of the ramp pulse generated by the switch (90 ps) combined with the fast response of the traveling wave deflection plates (150 ps) significantly reduced the jitter caused by the shot-to-shot laser fluctuation. At {approx}1% rms (root mean square) laser energy fluctuation, the resolution of the camera is 1.1 ps when over 5000 laser shots were accumulated. This is two times better than that of the previous design with slower response (300 ps) deflection plates.
Date: July 19, 2002
Creator: Liu, J.; MacPhee, A. G.; Liu, C.; Shan, B.; Wang, J. & Chang, Z.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Trident as an ultrahigh irradiance laser

Description: The Trident Nd:glass ICF laser at Los Alamos may be operated in a mode that produces high ultrashort pulses by the chirp/compression method. The 125-ps pulses from a standard moderated, ND:YLF oscillator are first frequency-broadened to 3-nm bandwidth, chirped in a quartz fiber, and then compressed with a grating pair to 1.5 ps. A second quartz fiber then provides nonlinear polarization rotation for background and satellite suppression and to further broaden the spectrum to >7 nm. Pulses are chirped again to 1 ns width with a second grating pair and amplified in a ND:YAG pumped Ti:sapphire regenerative amplifier. Millijoule-level output is then amplified through the existing phosphate glass Trident amplifier chain before compression to <400 fs. Energy {>=}1 J with excellent beam quality and contrast ratio is routinely produced by compressing after three rod amplifier stages. Higher energies are possible by compression further along the amplifier chain. Simultaneous use of long ({approximately}1 ns) pulses for plasma formation is also possible.
Date: February 1, 1995
Creator: Johnson, R. P.; Moncur, N. K.; Cobble, J. A.; Watt, R. G. & Gibson, R. B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Measurement of the Rise-Time in a Single Sided Ladder Detector

Description: In this note we report on the measurement of the preamplifier output rise time for a SVXII chip mounted on a D0 single sided ladder. The measurements were performed on the ladder 001-883-L, using the laser test stand of Lab D. The rise time was measured for different values of the response (or bandwidth) of the preamplifier. As a bigger bandwidth results in longer rise times and therefore in less noise, the largest possible bandwidth consistent with the time between bunch crossings should be chosen to operate the detectors. The rise time is defined as the time elapsed between 10% and 90% of the charge is collected. It is also interesting to measure the time for full charge collection and the percentage of charge collected in 132 ns and 396 ns. The results are shown in table 1, for bandwidths between 2 and 63 (binary numbers). The uncertainty on the time measurement is considered to be {approx} 10 ns. Figure 1 schematically defines the four quantities measured: rise time, time of full charge collection, and percentage of charge collected in 132 ns and 396 ns. Figures 2 to 8 are the actual measurements for bandwidths of 2, 4, 8, 12, 24, 32 and 63. Figure 9 is a second measurement for BW=24, used as a consistency check of the system and the time measurement performed on the plots. The data indicate that the single sided ladders can be operated at BW=63 for 396 ns and BW=12 for 132 ns, achieving full charge collection. This will result in smaller noise than originally anticipated.
Date: November 10, 1997
Creator: Gerber, C. E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A SIMPLIFIED APPROACH TO ANALYZE AND MODEL INDUCTIVE VOLTAGE ADDER

Description: We have recently developed a simplified model and a set of simple formulas for inductive voltage adder design. This model reveals the relationship of output waveform parameters and hardware designs. A computer simulation has demonstrated that parameter estimation based on this approach is accurate as compared to an actual circuit. This approach can be used in early stages of project development to assist feasibility study, geometry selection in engineering design, and parameter selection of critical components. In this paper, we give the deduction of a simplified model. Among the estimation formulas we present are those for pulse rise time, system impedance, and number of stages. Examples are used to illustrate the advantage of this approach. This approach is also applicable to induction LINAC design.
Date: June 25, 2007
Creator: ZHANG,W.; ENG, W.; PAI, C.; SANDBERG, J.; TAN, Y. & TIAN, Y.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

INDUCTIVE VOLTAGE ADDER NETWORK ANALYSIS AND MODEL SIMPLIFICATION.

Description: Inductive voltage adder topology has attracted great attentions in pulse power community for near two decades. However, there has been lack of literatures on inductive voltage adder network analysis and circuit design model. We have recently developed a simplified model and a set of simple formulas. An expanded model and more detailed analysis are presented in this paper. Our model reveals the relationship of output waveform parameters and hardware designs. Computer simulations have demonstrated that parameter estimation based on this approach is accurate. This approach can be used in early stages of project development to assist feasibility study, geometry selection in engineering design, and parameter selection of critical components. A set of fundamental estimation formulas including system impedance, rise time, and number of stages are presented. This approach is also applicable to induction LINAC design. In addition, the model presented in this paper shows a new topology of high voltage waveform generator.
Date: June 17, 2007
Creator: ZHANG,W.; NG, W.; PAI, C.; SANDBERG, J.; TAN, Y. & TIAN, Y.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Research and development of RHIC injection kicker upgrade with nano second FID pulse generator

Description: Our recent effort to test a 50 kV, 1 kA, 50 ns pulse width, 10 ns pulse rise time FID pulse generator with a 250 ft transmission cable, resistive load, and existing RHIC injection kicker magnet has produced unparalleled results. This is the very first attempt to drive a high strength fast kicker magnet with a nano second high pulsed power (50 MVA) generator for large accelerator and colliders. The technology is impressive. We report here the result and future plan of RHIC Injection kicker upgrade.
Date: May 20, 2012
Creator: W., Zhang; Sandberg, J.; Hahn, H.; Fischer, W.; Liaw, C.J.; Pai, C. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A Drive Laser for Multi-Bunch Photoinjector Operation

Description: Numerous electron beam applications would benefit from increased average current without sacrificing beam brightness. Work is underway at LLNL to investigate the performance of X-band photoinjectors that would generate electron bunches at a rate matching the RF drive frequency, i.e. one bunch per RF cycle. A critical part of this effort involves development of photo-cathode drive laser technology. Here we present a new laser architecture that can generate pulse trains at repetition rates up to several GHz. This compact, fiber-based system is driven directly by the accelerator RF and so is inherently synchronized with the accelerating fields, and scales readily over a wide range of drive frequencies (L-band through X-band). The system will be required to produce 0.5 {mu}J, {approx}200 fs rise time, spatially and temporally shaped UV pulses designed to optimize the electron beam brightness. Presented is the current status of this system, producing 2 ps pulses from a continuous-wave source.
Date: May 11, 2012
Creator: Gibson, D J; Cormier, E; Messerly, M J; Prantil, M A & Barty, C J
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Stress Corrosion Cracking Response of 304 Stainless Steel in ASerated and Dearated Water

Description: Scoping stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tests of 304 stainless steel (SS) were performed in 75 C and 250 C aerated pressurized water (APW) and 250 C deaerated pressurized water (DPW). The 250 C APW environment was used to initiate intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) and then the water was deaerated and hydrogenated to see if IGSCC continued in 250 C DPW. Tests were performed with and without 200 ppb SO{sub 4}{sup =}. The 304 SS test materials were evaluated in either the as-received, heavily sensitized (649 C for 1 h), fully sensitized (1099 C for 1 h/water quench/621 C for 17 h) or 20% cold rolled condition. At the beginning of each test sequence, specimens were subjected to continuous cycling with a 500s rise/500s fall or a 5000s rise/500s fall to promote the transition from a transgranular (TG) precrack to an IG crack. After generating a uniform crack under continuous cycling conditions, a trapezoidal waveform with 500s rise/9000s hold/500s fall was used to characterize the SCC behavior. Crack growth rates (CGRs) were monitored continuously with the electric potential drop (EPD) method and were corrected based on physical crack length measurements obtained when specimens were destructively evaluated. Continuous cycling with a 500s or 5000s rise time was found to produce both TG faceting and IGSCC in fully sensitized 304 SS tested in 75 C APW with 7 ppm O{sub 2} and 200 ppb SO{sub 4}{sup =}. However, no measurable crack extension occurred when a 9000 s hold time was introduced. Extensive IGSCC occurred in heavily sensitized and fully sensitized 304 SS in 250 C APW with 1 ppm O{sub 2} and 200 ppb SO{sub 4}{sup =}. IGSCC initiated under continuous cycling conditions with a 500 s rise time, and rapid IGSCC occurred when a 9000 s hold time was introduced. During ...
Date: April 30, 2007
Creator: Mills, W. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Displacement Current and Surface Flashover

Description: High-voltage vacuum insulator failure is generally due to surface flashover rather than insulator bulk breakdown. Vacuum surface flashover is widely believed to be initiated by a secondary electron emission avalanche along the vacuum-insulator interface. This process requires a physical mechanism to cause secondary electrons emitted from the insulator surface to return to that surface. Here, we show that when an insulator is subjected to a fast high-voltage pulse, the magnetic field due to displacement current through the insulator can provide this mechanism. This indicates the importance of the voltage pulse shape, especially the rise time, in the flashover initiation process.
Date: July 17, 2007
Creator: harris, J R; Caporaso, G J; Blackfield, D & Chen, Y J
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Single-Mode VISAR

Description: High energy-density physics (HEDP) experiments examine the properties of materials under extreme conditions. These experiments rely on the measurement of one or two velocities. These velocities are used to obtain Hugoniot relationships and thermodynamic equations of state. This methodology is referred to as 'velocimetry' and an instrument used to measure the shock wave is called a 'velocimeter' or a '(velocity) diagnostic'. The two most-widely used existing velocity diagnostics are; photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV) and velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR). PDV's advantages are a fast rise-time and ease of implementation but PDV has an upper velocity limit. Traditional implementations of VISAR have a rise time 10 times slower than PDV and are not easily implemented but are capable of measuring any velocity produced during HEDP experiments. This thesis describes a novel method of combining the positive attributes of PDV and VISAR into a more cost effective diagnostic called a Single-Mode VISAR (SMV). The new diagnostic will consist of PDV parts in a VISAR configuration. This configuration will enable the measurement of any velocity produced during shock physics experiments while the components used to build the diagnostic will give the diagnostic a fast rise time and make it easy to use. This thesis describes the process of building and testing the first single-mode VISAR. The tests include verifying the performance of the components and the diagnostic as a whole.
Date: November 16, 2007
Creator: Krauter, K
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

REDUCING BEAM COUPLING IMPEDANCES IN SNS RING EXTRACTION KICKERS

Description: The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) Accumulator ring extraction system includes 14 modules of windowframe ferrite pulsing kicker magnets with the rise time of about 200 ns. Their contribution to the beam coupling impedances is a serious concern. The kicker impedances, as well as its deflecting magnetic field versus time, are studied using detailed 3-D MAFIA modeling. Various design options, external circuit resistances, and a range of ferrite permeabilities are explored. A kicker module with wide conductor windings around the ferrite behind the kicker current sheet suggests a significant reduction of the kicker transverse and longitudinal coupling impedances. This design provides a good extraction field performance, as demonstrated by electromagnetic simulations. Results of measurements for a small model are also presented.
Date: January 1, 2001
Creator: Kurennoy, S. (Sergey); Davino, D. (Daniele) & Lee, Y. Y.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Design of a High Field Stress, Velvet Cathode for the Flash X-Ray (FXR) Induction Accelerator

Description: A new cathode design has been proposed for the Flash X-Ray (FXR) induction linear accelerator with the goal of lowering the beam emittance. The original design uses a conventional Pierce geometry and applies a peak field of 134 kV/cm (no beam) to the velvet emission surface. Voltage/current measurements indicate that the velvet begins emitting near this peak field value and images of the cathode show a very non-uniform distribution of plasma light. The new design has a flat cathode/shroud profile that allows for a peak field stress of 230 kV/cm on the velvet. The emission area is reduced by about a factor of four to generate the same total current due to the greater field stress. The relatively fast acceleration of the beam, approximately 2.5 MeV in 10 cm, reduces space charge forces that tend to hollow the beam for a flat, non-Pierce geometry. The higher field stress achieved with the same rise time is expected to lead to an earlier and more uniform plasma formation over the velvet surface. Simulations and initial testing are presented.
Date: June 8, 2007
Creator: Houck, T; Brown, C; Fleming, D; Kreitzer, B; Lewis, K; Ong, M et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

EXTRACTION SYSTEM DESIGN FOR THE BSNS/RCS.

Description: The BSNS extraction system takes use one of the four dispersion-free straight sections. Five vertical kickers and one Lambertson septum magnet are used for the one-turn extraction. The rise time of less 250 ns and the total kicking angle of 20 mrad are required for the kickers that are grouped into two tanks. The design for the kicker magnets and the PFN is also given. To reduce the low beam loss in the extraction channels due to large halo emittance, large apertures are used for both the kickers and septum. Stray magnetic field inside and at the two ends of the circulating path of the Lambertson magnet and its effect to the beam has been studied.
Date: June 23, 2006
Creator: WEI, J.; CHEN, Y.; CHI, Y.L.; JIANG, Y.L.; KANG, W.; PANG, J.B. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Rise and Fall of Type Ia Supernova Light Curves in the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

Description: We analyze the rise and fall times of Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) light curves discovered by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey. From a set of 391 light curves k-corrected to the rest-frame B and V bands, we find a smaller dispersion in the rising portion of the light curve compared to the decline. This is in qualitative agreement with computer models which predict that variations in radioactive nickel yield have less impact on the rise than on the spread of the decline rates. The differences we find in the rise and fall properties suggest that a single 'stretch' correction to the light curve phase does not properly model the range of SN Ia light curve shapes. We select a subset of 105 light curves well observed in both rise and fall portions of the light curves and develop a '2-stretch' fit algorithm which estimates the rise and fall times independently. We find the average time from explosion to B-band peak brightness is 17.38 {+-} 0.17 days, but with a spread of rise times which range from 13 days to 23 days. Our average rise time is shorter than the 19.5 days found in previous studies; this reflects both the different light curve template used and the application of the 2-stretch algorithm. The SDSS-II supernova set and the local SNe Ia with well-observed early light curves show no significant differences in their average rise-time properties. We find that slow-declining events tend to have fast rise times, but that the distribution of rise minus fall time is broad and single peaked. This distribution is in contrast to the bimodality in this parameter that was first suggested by Strovink (2007) from an analysis of a small set of local SNe Ia. We divide the SDSS-II sample in half based ...
Date: January 1, 2010
Creator: Hayden, Brian T.; Garnavich, Peter M.; Kessler, Richard; Frieman, Joshua A.; Jha, Saurabh W.; Bassett, Bruce et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department