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Dogmatism, Anxiety, and Attitudes Toward the Vietnam War

Description: The purpose of this study was to determine if there is a relationship between dogmatism, anxiety, and attitudes toward the Vietnam War, and, in the process of doing so, to test Rokeach's hypothesis of independence of belief structure and content in the contextual atmosphere of recent attitudes toward the Vietnam War. The Vietnam War Scale, Form E of the Dogmatism Scale, and a five-situation version of the S-R Inventory of Anxiousness were administered to 104 male students who were enrolled in introductory psychology classes at North Texas State University. It was hypothesized I. That there would be a significant positive relationship between dogmatism (as measured by the Dogmatism Scale) and anxiety (as measured by a five-situation version of the S-R Inventory of Anxiousness). II. That there would be a significant positive relationship between closed-mindedness (as measured by the Dogmatism Scale) and attitudes toward the Vietnam War (as measured by the Vietnam War Scale). III. That the Hawks would show a significantly higher level of dogmatism than the Doves. IV. That the Hawks would show a significantly higher level of anxiety than the Doves. Hypotheses one, two, and three were supported. Hypothesis number four was in the predicted direction, but was not statistically significant. The conclusion of the study was that a relationship exists between dogmatism, anxiety, and attitudes toward the Vietnam War. It was also concluded that Rokeach's hypothesis of independence of belief structure and content does not apply to the contextual atmosphere of recent attitudes toward the Vietnam War.
Date: December 1971
Creator: Puddy, Phillip Aldon
Partner: UNT Libraries

Attachment Theory Within Clinical Supervision: Application of the Conceptual to the Empirical

Description: Attachment theory has established itself as applicable to many types of relationships, encompassing caregiver-child, romantic, interpersonal, and psychotherapeutic interactions. This project sought to investigate the application of attachment theory to clinical supervision. Using suggestions put forth in previous work by Watkins and Riggs, this study examined the dyadic interactions inherent in both supervision and attachment. Using the working alliance as determination of the quality of supervision, attachment styles, leader-follower attachment, and attachment-based expectations were explored as predictors for supervisor-trainee dyad outcome in a training clinic for doctoral psychology students. The study design is longitudinal and prospective. Findings indicate the necessity of measurement of supervisory-specific attachment rather than general attachment, the stability of working alliance over time, and the large contribution of the leader-member attachment framework to the understanding of supervisory attachment. Implications include the importance of maintaining hierarchical, evaluative boundaries within supervisory relationship, consistent with a leader-follower dynamic.
Date: August 2015
Creator: Wrape, Elizabeth R.
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Influence of Time-Keeping Devices on Time Perception

Description: The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that time-keeping devices influence our perception of time in a way apart from their usual role of telling time. The subjects obtained for this project consisted of forty-two students enrolled in freshman psychology courses at North Texas State University.
Date: August 1974
Creator: Buckley, Thomas E.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Attitudes Toward Psychodiagnostic Testing and Doctoral Clinical Psychology Students' Professional Expectations and Training

Description: Responses of 111 doctoral clinical psychology students to Garfield and Kurtz' (1973) Testing Attitude Scale were subjected to a 2 x 2 factorial analysis. Attitudes toward psychodiagnostic testing were found to be related both to academic versus nonacademic professional expectations (academics scoring more negatively, M = 32.69, than nonacademics, M = 37.19), F (1, 107) = 5.994, p < 0.016, and to internship training exposure (non-interns scoring more negatively, M = 34.64, than interns, M = 38.80), F (1, 107) = 10.321, p< 0.002. Results paralleled previous research on academic and nonacademic working psychologists' attitudes. Similarities in students' and role models' attitudes were discussed in terms of Kelman's (1953; 1958), Festinger's (1957), and Bem's (1970) attitude theories. Results seemed to imply continued controversy over both the desirability of producing psychodiagnostically oriented clinicians, and also traditional paradigms of psychodiagnostic training.
Date: August 1976
Creator: Steele, J. Richard
Partner: UNT Libraries