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Reservoir technology research at LBL addressing geysers issues

Description: The Geothermal Technology Division of the Department of Energy is redirecting a significant part of its Reservoir Technology funding to study problems now being experienced at The Geysers. These include excessive pressure drawdown and associated decline in well flow rates, corrosion due to high chloride concentration in the produced steam and high concentration of noncondensible gases in some parts of the field. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is addressing some of these problems through field, laboratory and theoretical studies. 11 refs., 6 figs.
Date: April 1, 1990
Creator: Lippmann, M.J. & Bodvarsson, G.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Interaction of cold-water aquifers with exploited reservoirs of the Cerro Prieto geothermal system

Description: Cerro Prieto geothermal reservoirs tend to exhibit good hydraulic communication with adjacent cool groundwater aquifers. Under natural state conditions the hot fluids mix with the surrounding colder waters along the margins of the geothermal system, or discharge to shallow levels by flowing up fault L. In response to exploitation reservoir pressures decrease, leading to changes in the fluid flow pattern in the system and to groundwater influx. The various Cerro Prieto reservoirs have responded differently to production, showing localized near-well or generalized boiling, depending on their access to cool-water recharge. Significant cooling by dilution with groundwater has only been observed in wells located near the edges of the field. In general, entry of cool water at Cerro Prieto is beneficial because it tends to maintain reservoir pressures, restrict boiling, and lengthen the life and productivity of wells. 15 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.
Date: April 1, 1990
Creator: Truesdell, A.H. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (USA)) & Lippmann, M.J. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA))
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

High-. beta. operation and MHD (magnetohydrodynamic) activity on TFTR

Description: Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activity within three zones (core, half- radius, and edge) of TFTR (Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research (1986), (IAEA, Vienna, 1987), Vol. 1, P. 51) tokamak plasmas are discussed. Near the core of the plasma column, sawteeth are often observed. Two types of sawteeth are studied in detail: one with complete, and the other with incomplete magnetic reconnection. Their characteristics are determined by the shape of the q profile. Near the half-radius the m/n = 3/2 and 2/1 resistive ballooning modes are found to correlate with a beta collapse. The pressure and the pressure gradient at the mode rational surface are found to play an important role in stability. MHD activity is also studied at the plasma edge during limiter H-modes. The Edge Localized Mode (ELMs) are found to have a precursor mode with a frequency between 50--200 kHz and a mode number m/n = 1/0. The mode does not show a ballooning structure. While these instabilities have been studied on many other machines, on TFTR the studies have been extended to high pressure (plasma pressure greater than 4 {times} 10{sup 5} Pa) and low collisionality. 16 refs., 3 figs.
Date: April 1, 1990
Creator: McGuire, K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Beneficial effects of groundwater entry into liquid-dominated geothermal systems

Description: In all active liquid-dominated geothermal systems there is continuous circulation of mass and transfer of heat, otherwise they would slowly cool and fade away. In the natural state these systems are in dynamic equilibrium with the surrounding colder groundwater aquifers. The ascending geothermal fluids cool conductively, boil, or mix with groundwaters, and ultimately may discharge at the surface as fumaroles or hot springs. With the start of fluid production and the lowering of reservoir pressure, the natural equilibrium is disrupted and cooler groundwater tends to enter the reservoir. Improperly constructed or damaged wells, and wells located near the margins of the geothermal system, exhibit temperature reductions (and possibly scaling from mixing of chemically distinct fluids) as the cooler-water moves into the reservoir. These negative effects, especially in peripheral wells are, however, compensated by the maintenance of reservoir pressure and a reduction in reservoir boiling that might result in mineral precipitation in the formation pores and fractures. The positive effect of cold groundwater entry on the behavior of liquid-dominated system is illustrated by using simple reservoir models. The simulation results show that even though groundwater influx into the reservoir causes cooling of fluids produced from wells located near the cold-water recharge area, it also reduces pressure drawdown and boiling in the exploited zone, and sweeps the heat stored in the reservoir rocks toward production wells, thus increasing the productive life of the wells and field. 9 refs.
Date: April 1, 1990
Creator: Lippmann, M.J. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA)) & Truesdell, A.H. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (USA))
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department