343 Matching Results

Search Results

Advanced search parameters have been applied.

Cellular biomarkers for measuring toxicity of xenobiotics: effects of PCBs on earthworm Lumbricus terrestris coelomocytes

Description: The research presented herein provides information on coelomocyte (leukocyte) collection, function and immunotoxicity from polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) in the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris. Research was undertaken as part of an overall goal to develop a well-documented and scientifically valid non-mammalian surrogate immunoassay with the earthworm L. terrestris to assess immunotoxic potential of xenobiotics.
Date: May 1991
Creator: Eyambe, George Sona
Partner: UNT Libraries

Trends in Polychlorinated Biphenyl Concentrations in Hudson River Water Five Years after Elimination of Point Sources

Description: From purpose and scope: The main purpose of this monitoring was to gather several years of data on PCB concentrations preparatory to removal of contaminated sediments by dredging, which was originally scheduled for the early 1980's. Plans for dredging and disposal of sediments are currently being reevaluated. This report examines the contribution and transport of PCB's (polychlorinated biphenyls) from various reaches of the Hudson River and the changes in PCB concentration since 1977, when discharge was terminated.
Date: 1983
Creator: Schroeder, Roy A. & Barnes, Charles R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Analytical results for the 107-N and 1310-N basin sedimentdisposition sample characterization project

Description: Turnaround time for this project was 60 days, as required in Reference 2. The analyses were to be performed using SW-846 procedures whenever possible to meet analytical requirements as a Resource Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA) protocol project. Except for the preparation and analyses of polychlorinated biphenyl hydrocarbons (PCB) and Nickel-63, which the program deleted as a required analyte for 222-S Laboratory, all preparative and analytical work was performed at the 222-S Laboratory. Quanterra Environmental Services of Earth City, Missouri, performed the PCB analyses. During work on this project, two events occurred nearly simultaneously, which negatively impacted the 60 day deliverable schedule: an analytical hold due to waste handling issues at the 222-S Laboratory, and the discovery of PCBs at concentrations of regulatory significance in the 105-N Basin samples. Due to findings of regulatory non-compliance by the Washington State, Department of Ecology, the 222-S Laboratory placed a temporary administrative hold on its analytical work until all waste handling, designation and segregation issues were resolved. During the hold of approximately three weeks, all analytical and waste.handling procedures were rewritten to comply with the legal regulations, and all staff were retrained in the designation, segregation and disposal of RCRA liquid and solid wastes.
Date: June 2, 1997
Creator: Miller, G.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Analytical services Organization Union Valley sample Preparation facility Polychlorinated Biphenyl (PCB) Annual Inventory Document

Description: The Analytical Services Organization (ASO), Union Valley Sample Preparation Facility (UVSPF), provides analytical testing in support of the Department of Energy (DOE), Oak Ridge Operations (ORO), and associated sites. Samples generated on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) are routinely received at the WSPF for analytical evaluatiotiidentification. Many of these samples are polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) regulated from a source or being sent to the facility to determine PCB content. PCB laboratory wastes in solid and liquid form are generated during the evaluation of these materials, requiring the WSPF staff to maintain formal storage areas for staging the materials prior to off-site shipment for disposal. The purpose of this report is to fulfill the requirements set forth in Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 761.180(a), Subpart J, which requires owners or operators of a facility using or storing PCBS to prepare an annual inventory document by July 1 of the current year which covers the previous calendar year. This report provides documentation of the inventory of PCB materials/wastes that were generated, stored for dispos~ and shipped off site for disposal for the period January 1, 1997, to January 1, 1998. The following is a summary of materials/wastes subject to the aforementioned reporting requirements.
Date: June 1, 1998
Creator: Brown, B. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Draft Genome Sequence of Cupriavidus sp. Strain SK-4, a di-ortho-Substituted Biphenyl-Utilizing Bacterium Isolated from Polychlorinated Biphenyl-Contaminated Sludge

Description: Article on the draft genome sequence of Cupriavidus sp. strain SK-4, a di-ortho-substituted biphenyl-utilizing bacterium isolated from polychlorinated biphenyl-contaminated sludge.
Date: May 1, 2014
Creator: Vilo, Claudia A.; Benedik, Michael J.; Ilori, Matthew Olusoji & Dong, Qunfeng
Partner: UNT College of Arts and Sciences

Environmental Biosciences Program Fourth Quarter Report

Description: In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risk issues. These initiatives are consistent with the Medical University's role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable the Medical University to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBP's success in convening worldwide scientific expertise is due in part to the inherent credibility the Medical University brings to the process of addressing these complex issues.
Date: April 30, 2003
Creator: Lawrence C. Mohr, M.d.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Environmental Biosciences First Quarter Report

Description: In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific research program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risk issues. These initiatives are consistent with the Medical University's role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable the Medical University to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBP's success in convening worldwide scientific expertise is due in part to the inherent credibility the Medical University brings to the process of addressing these complex issues. Current research projects have focused EBP talent and resources on providing the scientific basis for risk-based standards, risk-based decision making and the accelerated clean-up of widespread environmental hazards. These hazards include trichloroethylene (TCE), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), asbestos and low-dose ionizing radiation. A project is also being conducted in the use of geographical information system technology to analyze population health risks related to environmental hazards as a tool for risk-based decision-making.
Date: September 30, 2003
Creator: Lawrence C. Mohr, M.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Final report for Tank 100 Sump sludge (KON332) for polychlorinated biphenyl`s (PCB)

Description: Final Report for Tank 100 Sump Sludge (KON332) for Polychlorinated Biphenyl`s (PCB) Sample Receipt Sample KON332 was received from Tank 100-Sump (WESF) on May 18, 1998. The laboratory number issued for this sample is S98BOO0207 as shown on the Request for Sample Analysis (RSA) form (Attachment 4). The sample breakdown diagram (Attachment 3) provides a cross-reference of customer sample identification to the laboratory identification number. Attachment 4 provides copies of the Request for Sample Analysis (RSA) and Chain of Custody (COC) forms. The sample was received in the laboratory in a 125-ml polybottle. Breakdown and subsampling was performed on June 6, 1998. PCB analysis was performed on the wet sludge. A discussion of the results is presented in Attachment 2. The 222-S extraction bench sheets are presented in Attachment 5. The PCB raw data are presented in Attachment 6.
Date: July 30, 1998
Creator: Fuller, R.K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Tank 214-AW-105, grab samples, analytical results for the finalreport

Description: This document is the final report for tank 241-AW-105 grab samples. Twenty grabs samples were collected from risers 10A and 15A on August 20 and 21, 1996, of which eight were designated for the K Basin sludge compatibility and mixing studies. This document presents the analytical results for the remaining twelve samples. Analyses were performed in accordance with the Compatibility Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) and the Data Quality Objectives for Tank Farms Waste Compatibility Program (DO). The results for the previous sampling of this tank were reported in WHC-SD-WM-DP-149, Rev. 0, 60-Day Waste Compatibility Safety Issue and Final Results for Tank 241-A W-105, Grab Samples 5A W-95-1, 5A W-95-2 and 5A W-95-3. Three supernate samples exceeded the TOC notification limit (30,000 microg C/g dry weight). Appropriate notifications were made. No immediate notifications were required for any other analyte. The TSAP requested analyses for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) for all liquids and centrifuged solid subsamples. The PCB analysis of the liquid samples has been delayed and will be presented in a revision to this document.
Date: February 20, 1997
Creator: Esch, R.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Polychlorinate biphenyls (PCB) analysis report for solid sample for 219S tank 102

Description: One waste sample was analyzed (with duplicate, matrix spike, and matrix spike duplicate) for PCBs as Aroclor mixtures by the Inorganic/Organic Chemistry Group. A soxhlet extraction procedure was used for extraction of the Aroclors from the sample. Analysis was performed using dual column confirmation gas chromatography/electron capture detection (GC/ECD). Extraction follows closely method 354 C of SW-846, analysis follows SW-846 method 8082. A cross reference of laboratory sample number to the customer identification is given in a table.
Date: December 5, 1997
Creator: Ross, G.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Computer Model for Prediction of PCB Dechlorination and Biodegradation Endpoints

Description: Mathematical modeling of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) transformation served as a means of predicting possible endpoints of bioremediation, thus allowing evaluation of several of the most common transformation patterns. Correlation between laboratory-observed and predicted endpoint data was, in some cases, as good as 0.98 (perfect correlation = 1.0).
Date: April 19, 1999
Creator: Just, E.M. & Klasson, T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Sequential anaerobic-aerobic degradation of indigenous PCBs in a contaminated soil matrix

Description: Many industrial locations, including the US Department of Energy`s, have identified needs for treatment of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) wastes and remediation of PCB-contaminated sites. Biodegradation of PCBs is a potentially effective technology for the treatment of PCB-contaminated soils and sludges; however, a practicable remediation technology has not yet been demonstrated. A biological treatment technology is likely to consist of an anaerobic fermentation step in which PCB dechlorination takes place producing PCBs with fewer chlorines. These products are then more susceptible to aerobic mineralization. In laboratory experiments, soil slurry bioreactors inoculated with microorganisms extracted from PCB-contaminated sediments from the Hudson River and Woods Pond have been used to obtain anaerobic dechlorination of PCBs in soil slurry reactors. The anaerobic dechlorination was followed by qualitative estimation of the effect of aerobic fermentation of the dechlorination products based on literature data. The sequential anaerobic-(simulated) aerobic treatment constituted an improvement compared anaerobic treatment alone.
Date: December 31, 1994
Creator: Klasson, K.T.; Reeves, M.E.; Evans, B.S. & Dudley, C.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Investigation of potential polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) contamination on Hanford site arc-loop roads

Description: Two roads on the Hanford Site, which had been treated during past Site operations with oil for dust suppression, were analyzed for potential polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) contamination. The general locations of these roads are (1) off Washington State Route 240, north of Horn Rapids Dam, and (2) between the 200 East and 200 West areas, south of the 200 Area fire station. Each road had an intact crust of oil/tar on top of the underlying soil surface. A set of control samples were collected at an untreated soil site near the Prosser Barricade air sampling station. Samples were collected of the oil/tar surface crust, the soil immediately beneath the surface crust (0 - 3 cm below the crust), and a deeper soil sample (13 - 23 cm below the surface crust). Samples were collected at two locations on each road. The PCBs were extracted from the samples using a roller technique with methylene chloride, cleaned using column chromatography and high-pressure liquid chromatography, and analyzed by capillary gas chromatography using electron capture detection. The samples were analyzed for PCBs as the following technical mixtures: Aroclor 1242, Aroclor 1248, Aroclor 1254, and Aroclor 1260. All samples at all locations were less than the following detection limits: surface crust (41 ug/kg dry weight) and soil (2.1 ug/kg dry weight). These concentrations are below the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region IX preliminary remediation goals for PCBs in residential soil (66 ug/kg) and well below the preliminary remediation goal for PCBs in industrial soil (340 ug/kg).
Date: September 1, 1997
Creator: Patton, G. W.; Cooper, A. T.; Riley, R. G.; Lefkovitz, L. F. & Gilfoil, T. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Effects of the Cerro Grande Fire (Smoke and Fallout Ash) on Soil Chemical Properties Within and Around Los Alamos National Laboratory

Description: Soil surface (0- to 2-in. depth) samples were collected from areas within and around Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) just after the Cerro Grande fire, analyzed for radionuclides, radioactivity, and trace elements (heavy metals), and compared to soil samples collected in 1999 from the same sites. In addition, many types of organic substances (volatile and semivolatile organic compounds, organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, high explosives, and dioxin and dioxin-like compounds) were assessed in soils from LANL, perimeter, and regional sites after the fire. Results show that impacts to regional, perimeter, and on-site (mesa top) areas from smoke and fallout ash as a result of the Cerro Grande fire were minimal.
Date: November 1, 2000
Creator: Fresquez, P.R.; Velasquez, W.R. & Naranjo, L. Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Post-Remediation Biomonitoring of Pesticides and Other Contaminants in Marine Waters and Sediment Near the United Heckathorn Superfund Site, Richmond, California

Description: This report, PNNL-1 3059 Rev. 1, was published in July 2000 and replaces PNNL-1 3059 which is dated October 1999. The revision corrects tissue concentration units that were reported as dry weight but were actually wet weight, and updates conclusions based on the correct reporting units. Marine sediment remediation at the United Heckathorn Superfund Site was completed in April 1997. Water and mussel tissues were sampled in February 1999 from four stations near Lauritzen Canal in Richmond, California, for Year 2 of post-remediation monitoring of marine areas near the United Heckathom Site. Dieldrin and dichlorodiphenyl trichloroethane (DDT) were analyzed in water samples, tissue samples from resident mussels, and tissue samples from transplanted mussels deployed for 4 months. Concentrations of dieldrin and total DDT in water and total DDT in tissue were compared with Year 1 of post-remediation monitoring, and with preremediation data from the California State Mussel Watch program (tissue s) and the Ecological Risk Assessment for the United Heckathorn Superfund Site (tissues and water). Mussel tissues were also analyzed for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), which were detected in sediment samples. Chlorinated pesticide concentrations in water samples were similar to preremediation levels and did not meet remediation goals. Mean dieldrin concentrations in water ranged from 0.62 ng/L to 12.5 ng/L and were higher than the remediation goal (0.14 ng/L) at all stations. Mean total DDT concentrations in water ranged from 14.4 ng/L to 62.3 ng/L and exceeded the remediation goal (0.59 ng/L) at all stations. The highest concentrations of both DDT and dieldrin were found at the Lauritzen Canal/End station. Despite exceedence of the remediation goals, chlorinated pesticide concentrations in Lauritzen Canal water samples were notably lower in 1999 than in 1998. PCBS were not detected in water samples in 1999.
Date: September 6, 2000
Creator: Antrim, LD & Kohn, NP
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Reduction of radioactivity in oils prior to PCB analysis: A new use for solid phase extraction cartridges

Description: Radioactively contaminated oils represent a significant waste problem throughout the Department of Energy complex (DOE). From contaminated oils in glove box facilities at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) through the 1200 kg of oil waste at Paducah to an estimated 46,000 kg of contaminated oily water at Lawrence Livermore, contaminated oil exists at all of the DOE facilities. Dilution is the primary mechanism for reducing the radionuclides to safe handling levels prior to analysis. However, this approach requires contamination of instrumentation as well as increased limits of quantitation. Often, the dilutions required to maintain As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) guidelines result in limits of quantitation which are above the regulatory limits for waste acceptance. In order to maintain ALARA guidelines while obtaining the lowest possible detection limits, the Organic Analysis Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory has established a cleanup technique for oils suspected of being contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls. The technique uses a 0.02 {mu}m disposable filter in conjunction with Florisil SPE cartridges. Using this technique we have demonstrated radionuclide reductions ranging from 60 to 95+% for gross alpha, beta, and gamma while maintaining analyte and surrogate recoveries well within established guidelines. Further advantages of this technique include its simplicity, the generation of a minimum of secondary waste materials, and the potential for field use. Implications of this analytical technique as well as applications to other analytes of interest are currently being explored.
Date: March 1995
Creator: Monagle, M.; Hakonson, K. M. & Roberts, J. B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The greening of PCB analytical methods

Description: Green chemistry incorporates waste minimization, pollution prevention and solvent substitution. The primary focus of green chemistry over the past decade has been within the chemical industry; adoption by routine environmental laboratories has been slow because regulatory standard methods must be followed. A related paradigm, microscale chemistry has gained acceptance in undergraduate teaching laboratories, but has not been broadly applied to routine environmental analytical chemistry. We are developing green and microscale techniques for routine polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) analyses as an example of the overall potential within the environmental analytical community. Initial work has focused on adaptation of commonly used routine EPA methods for soils and oils. Results of our method development and validation demonstrate that: (1) Solvent substitution can achieve comparable results and eliminate environmentally less-desirable solvents, (2) Microscale extractions can cut the scale of the analysis by at least a factor of ten, (3) We can better match the amount of sample used with the amount needed for the GC determination step, (4) The volume of waste generated can be cut by at least a factor of ten, and (5) Costs are reduced significantly in apparatus, reagent consumption, and labor.
Date: December 1, 1995
Creator: Erickson, M.D.; Alvarado, J.S. & Aldstadt, J.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department