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Polishing compound for plastic surfaces

Description: A polishing compound for plastic surfaces is disclosed. The compound contains by weight approximately 4 to 17 parts at least one petroleum distillate lubricant, 1 to 6 parts mineral spirits, 2.5 to 15 parts abrasive particles, and 2.5 to 10 parts water. The abrasive is tripoli or a similar material that contains colloidal silica. Preferably, most of the abrasive particles are less than approximately 10 microns, more preferably less than approximately 5 microns in size. The compound is used on PLEXIGLAS{sup TM}, LEXAN{sup TM}, LUCITE{sup TM}, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and similar plastic materials whenever a smooth, clear polished surface is desired.
Date: January 1, 1993
Creator: Stowell, M.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Metallography of Aluminum and Its Alloys: Use of Electrolytic Polishing

Description: Recent methods are described for electropolishing aluminum and aluminum alloys. Numerous references are included of electrolytic micrographic investigations carried out during the period 1948 to 1952. A detailed description of a commercial electrolytic polishing unit, suitable for micrographic examination of aluminum and its alloys, is included.
Date: November 1955
Creator: Jacquet, Pierre A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Advance in Vertical Buffered Electropolishing on Niobium for Particle Accelerators*

Description: Niobium (Nb) is the most popular material that has been employed for making superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities to be used in various particle accelerators over the last couple of decades. One of the most important steps in fabricating Nb SRF cavities is the final chemical removal of 150 {mu}m of Nb from the inner surfaces of the SRF cavities. This is usually done by either buffered chemical polishing (BCP) or electropolishing (EP). Recently a new Nb surface treatment technique called buffered electropolishing (BEP) has been developed at Jefferson Lab. It has been demonstrated that BEP can produce the smoothest surface finish on Nb ever reported in the literature while realizing a Nb removal rate as high as 10 {mu}m/min that is more than 25 and 5 times quicker than those of EP and BCP(112) respectively. In this contribution, recent advance in optimizing and understanding BEP treatment technique is reviewed. Latest results from RF measurements on BEP treated Nb single cell cavities by our unique vertical polishing system will be reported.
Date: September 1, 2011
Creator: Wu, A. T.; Jin, S.; Mammosser, J. D.; Reece, C. E.; Rimmer, R. A.; Lin, L. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Analysis of In-Situ Vibration Monitoring for End-Point Detection of CMP Planarization Processes

Description: This paper details the analysis of vibration monitoring for end-point control in oxide CMP processes. Two piezoelectric accelerometers were integrated onto the backside of a stainless steel polishing head of an IPEC 472 polisher. One sensor was placed perpendicular to the carrier plate (vertical) and the other parallel to the plate (horizontal). Wafers patterned with metal and coated with oxide material were polished at different speeds and pressures. Our results show that it is possible to sense a change in the vibration signal over time during planarization of oxide material on patterned wafers. The horizontal accelerometer showed more sensitivity to change in vibration amplitude compared to the vertical accelerometer for a given polish condition. At low carrier and platen rotation rates, the change in vibration signal over time at fixed frequencies decreased approximately ½ - 1 order of magnitude (over the 2 to 10 psi polish pressure ranges). At high rotation speeds, the vibration signal remained essentially constant indicating that other factors dominated the vibration signaL These results show that while it is possible to sense changes in acceleration during polishing, more robust hardware and signal processing algorithms are required to ensure its use over a wide range of process conditions.
Date: May 14, 1999
Creator: Hetherington, Dale L.; Lauffer, James P.; Shingledecker, David M.; Stein, David J. & Wyckoff, Edward E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Prediction of Tungsten CMP Pad Life Using Blanket Removal Rate Data and Endpoint Data Obtained from Process Temperature and Carrier Motor Current Measurments

Description: Several techniques to predict pad failure during tungsten CMP were investigated for a specific consumable set. These techniques include blanket polish rate measurements and metrics derived from two endpoint detection schemes. Blanket polish rate decreased significantly near pad failure. Metrics from the thermal endpoint technique included change in peak temperature, change in the time to reach peak temperature, and the change in the slope of the temperature trace just prior to peak temperature all as a function of pad life. Average carrier motor current before endpoint was also investigated. Changes in these metrics were observed however these changes, excluding time to peak process temperature, were either not consistent between pads or too noisy to be reliable predictors of pad failure.
Date: May 14, 1999
Creator: Hetherington, Dale L. & Stein, David J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Mechanistic study of dielectric chemical mechanical polishing by spectral and scaling analysis of atomic force microscope images

Description: Thermal oxide and PETEOS oxide surfaces, polished on an IPEC 472 with different combinations of polish pad, slurry, and polishing conditions, were studied with ex situ atomic force microscopy. The post polish surfaces were analyzed qualitatively by visual inspection and quantitatively by spectral and scaling analyses. Spectral and scaling analyses gave consistent interpretations of morphology evolution. Polishing with either a fixed abrasive pad or alumina-based slurry occurred via a mechanism for which asperities are removed and recesses are filled. A sputtering-type mechanism may contribute to material removal when polishing with silica- or ceria-based slurries.
Date: December 22, 1999
Creator: Verhoff, M.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Defect centers in chemical-mechanical polished MOS oxides

Description: Defect centers generated in vacuum-ultraviolet irradiated chemical-mechanical polished oxides have been characterized using electron paramagnetic resonance and C-V analysis. Both oxide trap E{sub {gamma}} and interface trap P{sub b0} centers were detected in unpolished and polished oxides. In addition, another interface defect center known as the P{sub b1} center was only identified in the polished oxides, suggesting that the polishing process altered the SiO{sub 2}/Si interface.
Date: December 31, 1994
Creator: Shaneyfelt, M.R.; Warren, W.L.; Hetherington, D.L.; Timon, R.P.; Resnick, P.J. & Winokur, P.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Reduction of Thermal Conductivity in Wafer-Bonded Silicon

Description: Blocks of silicon up to 3-mm thick have been formed by directly bonding stacks of thin wafer chips. These stacks showed significant reductions in the thermal conductivity in the bonding direction. In each sample, the wafer chips were obtained by polishing a commercial wafer to as thin as 36 {micro}m, followed by dicing. Stacks whose starting wafers were patterned with shallow dots showed greater reductions in thermal conductivity. Diluted-HF treatment of wafer chips prior to bonding led to the largest reduction of the effective thermal conductivity, by approximately a factor of 50. Theoretical modeling based on restricted conduction through the contacting dots and some conduction across the planar nanometer air gaps yielded fair agreement for samples fabricated without the HF treatment.
Date: November 27, 2006
Creator: Liau, ZL; Danielson, LR; Fourspring, PM; Hu, L; Chen, G & Turner, GW
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Mercury Laser System: An Average power, gas-cooled, Yb:S-FAP based system with frequency conversion and wavefront correction

Description: We report on the operation of the Mercury laser with fourteen 4 x 6 cm{sup 2} Yb:S-FAP amplifier slabs pumped by eight 100 kW peak power diode arrays. The system was continuously run at 55 J and 10 Hz for several hours, (2 x 10{sup 5} cumulative shots) with over 80% of the energy in a 6 times diffraction limited spot at 1.047 um. Improved optical quality was achieved in Yb:S-FAP amplifiers with magneto-rheological finishing, a deterministic polishing method. In addition, average power frequency conversion employing YCOB was demonstrated at 50% conversion efficiency or 22.6 J at 10 Hz.
Date: August 31, 2005
Creator: Bibeau, C; Bayramian, A; Armstrong, P; Ault, E; Beach, R; Benapfl, M et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

MRF Applications: On the Road to Making Large-Aperture Ultraviolet Laser Resistant Continuous Phase Plates for High-Power Lasers

Description: Over the past two years we have developed MRF tools and procedures to manufacture large-aperture (430 X 430 mm) continuous phase plates (CPPs) that are capable of operating in the infrared portion (1053 nm) of high-power laser systems. This is accomplished by polishing prescribed patterns of continuously varying topographical features onto finished plano optics using MRF imprinting techniques. We have been successful in making, testing, and using large-aperture CPPs whose topography possesses spatial periods as low as 4 mm and surface peak-to-valleys as high as 8.6 {micro}m. Combining this application of MRF technology with advanced MRF finishing techniques that focus on ultraviolet laser damage resistance makes it potentially feasible to manufacture large-aperture CPPs that can operate in the ultraviolet (351 nm) without sustaining laser-induced damage. In this paper, we will discuss the CPP manufacturing process and the results of 351-nm/3-nsec equivalent laser performance experiments conducted on large-aperture CPPs manufactured using advanced MRF protocols.
Date: October 26, 2006
Creator: Menapace, J A; Davis, P J; Steele, W A; Hachkowski, M R; Nelson, A & Xin, K
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Cluster ion beam polishing for inertial confinement fusion target capsules

Description: Targets for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) typically consist of a hollow, spherical capsule filled with a mixture of hydrogen isotopes. Typically, these capsules are irradiated by short, intense pulses of either laser light (``direct drive``) or laser-generated. x-rays (``indirect drive``), causing them to implode This compresses and heats the fuel, leading to thermonuclear fusion. This process is highly sensitive to hydrodynamic (e.g., Rayleigh-Taylor) instabilities, which can be initiated by imperfections in the target. Thus, target capsules must be spherical and smooth One of the lead capsule designs for the National Ignition Facility, a 1.8 MJ laser being built at Livermore, calls for a 2-mm- diam capsule with a 150-{micro}m-thick copper-doped beryllium wall. These capsules can be fabricated by sputter depositing the metal onto a spherical plastic mandrel. This results in surfaces with measured Rq`s of 50 to 150 nm, as measured with an atomic force microscope For optimal performance the roughness should be below 10 nm rms We have begun studying the use of ion cluster beam polishing as a means of improving the surface finish of as-deposited capsules In this approach, a batch of capsules would be agitated in a bounce pan inside a vacuum chamber during exposure to the cluster beam. This would ensure a uniform beam dose around the capsule. We have performed preliminary experiments on both Be flats and on a stationary Be capsule On the capsule, the measured Rq went from 64 nm before polishing to 15 nm after This result was obtained without any effort at process optimization. Similar smoothing was observed on the planar samples
Date: June 9, 1998
Creator: McEachern, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Infrastructure, Technology and Applications of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS)

Description: A review is made of the infrastructure, technology and capabilities of Sandia National Laboratories for the development of micromechanical systems. By incorporating advanced fabrication processes, such as chemical mechanical polishing, and several mechanical polysilicon levels, the range of micromechanical systems that can be fabricated in these technologies is virtually limitless. Representative applications include a micro-engine driven mirror, and a micromachined lock. Using a novel integrated MEMS/CMOS technology, a six degree-of-freedom accelerometer/gyroscope system has been designed by researchers at U.C. Berkeley and fabricated on the same silicon chip as the CMOS control circuits to produce an integrated micro-navigational unit.
Date: July 9, 1999
Creator: Allen, J.J.; Jakubczak, J.F.; Krygowski, T.W.; Miller, S.L.; Montague, S.; Rodgers, M.S. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Planar surface-micromachined pressure sensor with a sub-surface, embedded reference pressure cavity

Description: Planar, surface micromachined pressure sensors have been fabricated by an extension of the chemical-mechanical polishing (CMP) process. CMP eliminates many of the fabrication problems associated with the photolithography, dry etch, and metallization of non-planar devices. Furthermore, CMP adds additional design flexibility. The sensors are based upon deformable, silicon nitride diaphragms with polysilicon piezoresistors. Absolute pressure is detected by virtue of reference pressure cavities underneath the diaphragms. Process details are discussed and characteristics from many devices are presented.
Date: September 1, 1996
Creator: Eaton, W.P. & Smith, J.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Polishing Methods for Metallic and Ceramic Transmission Electron Microscopy Specimens

Description: "In recent years, the increasing sophistication of transmission electron microscope (TEM) studies of materials has necessitated more exacting methods of specimen preparation. The present report describes improved equipment and techniques for electropolishing and chemically polishing a wide variety of specimens. Many of the specimens used in developing or improving the techniques to be described were irradiated with heavy ions such as nickel or vanadium to study radiation damage. The high cost of these specimens increased the need for reproducible methods of initial preparation, postirradiaton processing, and final thinning for TEM examination. A technique was also developed to salvage specimens that had previously been thinned but were unusable for various reasons. Jet polishing is, in general, the method of choice for surface polishing, sectioning, and thinning. The older beaker electropolishing method is included in this report because it is inexpensive and simple, and gives some insight into how the more recent methods were developed. 29 figures, 8 tables. (ERA citation 07:004650)."--NTIS abstract.
Date: July 1981
Creator: Kestel, B. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Polishing Methods for Metallic and Ceramic Transmission Electron Microscopy Specimens, Rev. 1

Description: "In recent years, the increasing sophistication of transmission electron microscope (TEM) studies of materials has necessitated more exacting methods of specimen preparation. The present report describes improved equipment and techniques for electropolishing and chemically polishing a wide variety of specimens. Many of the specimens used in developing or improving the techniques to be described were irradiated with heavy ions such as nickel or vanadium to study radiation damage. The high cost of these specimens increased the need for reproducible methods of initial preparation postirradiation processing, and final thinning for TEM examination. A technique was also developed to salvage specimens that had previously been thinned but were unusable for various reasons. Jet polishing is, in general, the method of choice for surface polishing, sectioning, and thinning. The older beaker electropolishing method is included in this report because it is inexpensive and simple, and gives some insight into how the more recent methods were developed"--NTIS abstract.
Date: March 1986
Creator: Kestel, B. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Buffered Electrochemical Polishing of Niobium

Description: The standard preparation of superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities made of pure niobium include the removal of a 'damaged' surface layer, by buffered chemical polishing (BCP) or electropolishing (EP), after the cavities are formed. The performance of the cavities is characterized by a sharp degradation of the quality factor when the surface magnetic field exceeds about 90 mT, a phenomenon referred to as 'Q-drop'. In cavities made of polycrystalline fine grain (ASTM 5) niobium, the Q-drop can be significantly reduced by a low-temperature ({approx} 120 C) 'in-situ' baking of the cavity if the chemical treatment was EP rather than BCP. As part of the effort to understand this phenomenon, we investigated the effect of introducing a polarization potential during buffered chemical polishing, creating a process which is between the standard BCP and EP. While preliminary results on the application of this process to Nb cavities have been previously reported, in this contribution we focus on the characterization of this novel electrochemical process by measuring polarization curves, etching rates, surface finish, electrochemical impedance and the effects of temperature and electrolyte composition. In particular, it is shown that the anodic potential of Nb during BCP reduces the etching rate and improves the surface finish.
Date: March 1, 2011
Creator: Gianluigi Ciovati, Hui Tian, Sean Corcoran
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Measurements and Studies of Secondary Electron Emission of Diamond Amplified Photocathode

Description: The Diamond Amplified Photocathode (DAP) is a novel approach to generating electrons. By following the primary electron beam, which is generated by traditional electron sources, with an amplifier, the electron beam available to the eventual application is increased by 1 to 2 orders of magnitude in current. Diamond has a very wide band gap of 5.47eV which allows for a good negative electron affinity with simple hydrogenation, diamond can hold more than 2000MV/m field before breakdown. Diamond also provides the best rigidity among all materials. These two characters offer the capability of applying high voltage across very thin diamond film to achieve high SEY and desired emission phase. The diamond amplifier also is capable of handling a large heat load by conduction and sub-nanosecond pulse input. The preparation of the diamond amplifier includes thinning and polishing, cleaning with acid etching, metallization, and hydrogenation. The best mechanical polishing available can provide high purity single crystal diamond films with no less than 100 {micro}m thickness and <15 nm Ra surface roughness. The ideal thickness for 700MHz beam is {approx}30 {micro}m, which requires further thinning with RIE or laser ablation. RIE can achieve atomic layer removal precision and roughness eventually, but the time consumption for this procedure is very significant. Laser ablation proved that with <266nm ps laser beam, the ablation process on the diamond can easily achieve removing a few microns per hour from the surface and <100nm roughness. For amplifier application, laser ablation is an adequate and efficient process to make ultra thin diamond wafers following mechanical polishing. Hydrogenation will terminate the diamond surface with monolayer of hydrogen, and form NEA so that secondary electrons in the conduction band can escape into the vacuum. The method is using hydrogen cracker to strike hydrogen atoms onto the bare diamond surface to form ...
Date: October 1, 2008
Creator: Wu,Q.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Mirror smooth superconducting RF cavities by mechanical polishing with minimal acid use

Description: A new mechanical technique for polishing the inside surface of niobium superconducting RF (SRF) cavities has been developed. Mirror-like finishes, the smoothest observed in cavities so far, were produced after fine polishing, with < 15 nm RMS roughness over 1 mm{sup 2} scan area. This is an order of magnitude less than the typical roughness produced by electropolishing. The processing equipment has advantages of modest installed and operating costs, simple associated technology, and no large quantities of acutely toxic chemicals or special handling procedures. Cavity quality factors above 10{sup 10} were maintained well above the 35 MV m{sup -1} benchmark for electropolished cavities, and this was achieved with an intermediate finish not as smooth as the final polish. Repair of a weld defect, which is intrinsic to this process, was also demonstrated. These transformational aspects could enable a new SRF cavity processing paradigm for future large scale particle accelerators such as the International Linear Collider.
Date: February 1, 2011
Creator: Cooper, C. A. & Cooley, L. D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Particle-surface interactions in chemical mechanical polishing

Description: Material removal in chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) occurs by a pressure accentuated chemical attack of the surface. The polishing slurry typically consists of abrasive particles and reactive chemicals that may or may not include an oxidant. Post-CMP cleaning processes must remove both the ionic contaminants and any remaining polishing slurry particles. Central to the effectiveness of a clean is the use of conditions that will minimize the binding force between the residual particles and the wafer surface. The morphology and composition of the particle, the surface from which it must be removed, and the environment surrounding the wafer will determine the magnitude of forces that hold a particle to the wafer surface. At the Sandia/SEMATECH Center for Contamination Free Manufacturing, two techniques--atomic force microscopy (AFM) and electrokinetic deposition--are being used to explore these interactions for CMP of both oxide and tungsten surfaces. A basic understanding of particle-surface interaction forces and how they are affected by the chemical/physical environment of the particle and surface is the objective of this task. Modification of the binding forces between particles and wafer surfaces may be used to maximize post-CMP cleaning effectiveness.
Date: October 1, 1996
Creator: Dugger, M.T.; Adkins, C.L.J.; Resnick, P.J.; Jeon, J.S. & Raghavan, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A study of material removal during magnetorheological finishing. 1998 summer research program for high school juniors at the Univ. of Rochester`s Laboratory for Laser Energetics: Student research reports

Description: In the process of optical polishing, a new method has been developed called Magnetorheological Finishing, or MRF. This process utilizes both mechanical and chemical effects to remove material during polishing. To more fully understand the fundamental mechanisms of MR polishing the authors have successfully separated mechanical scratching from chemical softening in glass polishing with MRF by removing the water from the MR fluid. The addition of water initiates the chemical effects by hydrating the glass surface and changing the amplitude of the scratches. In addition, this study has found that the mechanical removal by scratching is related to the hardness of the magnetic carbonyl iron particles, and the hardness and type of the glass being polished.
Date: March 1, 1999
Creator: Hubregsen, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Planar surface-micromachined pressure sensors by chemical-mechanical polishing

Description: Planar, surface micromachined pressure sensors have been fabricated by an extension of the chemical-mechanical polishing (CMP) process. CMP eliminates many of the fabrication problems associated with the photolithography, dry etch, and metallization of non-planar devices. Furthermore, CMP adds additional design flexibility. The sensors are based upon deformable, silicon nitride diaphragms with polysilicon piezoresistors. Absolute pressure is detected by virtue of reference pressure cavities underneath the diaphragms.
Date: November 1, 1996
Creator: Eaton, W.P. & Smith, J.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Planarization techniques for MEMS: enabling new structures and enhancing manufacturability

Description: Planarization techniques such as chemical-mechanical polishing (CMP) have emerged as enabling technologies for the manufacturing of multi- level metal interconnects used in high-density Integrated Circuits (IC). An overview of general planarization techniques for MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS) and, in particular, the extension of CMP from sub-micron IC manufacturing to the fabrication of complex surface-micromachined MEMS will be presented. Planarization technique alleviates processing problems associated with fabrication of multi-level polysilicon structures, eliminates design constraints linked with non-planar topography, and provides an avenue for integrating different process technologies. The CMP process and present examples of the use of CMP in fabricating MEMS devices such as microengines, pressure sensors, and proof masses for accelerometers along with its use for monolithically integrating MEMS devices with microelectronics are presented.
Date: December 31, 1996
Creator: Smith, J.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Effects of various polishing media and techniques on the surface finish and behavior of laser glasses

Description: The advance of high-power laser technology is dependent on the rate of advancement in laser glass forming and surface preparation. The threshold damage of glass surfaces continues to be a weak link in the overall advancement of laser technology. Methods were developed and used in the evaluation of existing glass surface preparation techniques. Modified procedures were evaluated to reduce surface contamination and subsurface defects. Polishing rates were monitored under controlled polishing conditions (purity, pH, particle size distribution, particle concentration, etc.). Future work at LLL for this ongoing investigation is described.
Date: November 7, 1978
Creator: Landingham, R.L.; Casey, A.W. & Lindahl, R.O.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department