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A Study of Poisson's Ratio in the Yield Region

Description: "In the yield region of the stress-strain curve the variation in Poisson's ratio from the elastic to the plastic value is most pronounced. This variation was studied experimentally by a systematic series of tests on several aluminum alloys. The tests were conducted under simple tensile and compressive loading along three orthogonal axes" (p. 1).
Date: January 1952
Creator: Gerard, George & Wildhorn, Sorrel
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

ESTIMATING THE STRENGTH OF SINGLE-ENDED DISLOCATION SOURCES IN MICROMETER-SIZED SINGLE CRYSTALS

Description: A recent study indicated that the behavior of single-ended dislocation sources contributes to the flow strength of micrometer-scale crystals. In this study 3D discrete dislocation dynamics simulations of micrometer-sized volumes are used to calculate the effects of anisotropy of dislocation line tension (increasing Poisson's ratio, {nu}) on the strength of single-ended dislocation sources and, to compare them with the strength of double-ended sources of equal length. This is done by directly modeling their plastic response within a 1 micron cubed FCC Ni single crystal using DDS. In general, double-ended sources are stronger than single-ended sources of an equal length and exhibit no significant effects from truncating the long-range elastic fields at this scale. The double-ended source strength increases with Poisson ratio ({nu}), exhibiting an increase of about 50% at u = 0.38 (value for Ni) as compared to the value at {nu} = 0. Independent of dislocation line direction, for {nu} greater than 0.20, the strengths of single-ended sources depend upon the sense of the stress applied. The value for {alpha}, in the expression for strength, {tau} = {alpha}(L){micro}b/L is shown to vary from 0.4 to 0.84 depending upon the character of the dislocation and the direction of operation of the source at {nu} corresponding to that of Ni, 0.38 and a length of 933b. By varying the lengths of the sources from 933b to 233b, it was shown that the scaling of the strength of single-ended and double-ended sources with their length both follow a ln(L/b)/(L/b) dependence. Surface image stresses are shown to have little effect on the critical stress of single-ended sources at a length of {approx}250b or greater. The relationship between these findings and a recent statistical model for the hardening of small volumes is also discussed.
Date: May 3, 2007
Creator: Rao, S I; Dimiduk, D M; Tang, M; Parthasarathy, T A; Uchic, M D & Woodward, C
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A technique for determining the Poisson`s ratio of thin films

Description: The theory and experimental approach for a new technique used to determine the Poisson`s ratio of thin films are presented. The method involves taking the ratio of curvatures of cantilever beams and plates micromachined out of the film of interest. Curvature is induced by a through-thickness variation in residual stress, or by depositing a thin film under residual stress onto the beams and plates. This approach is made practical by the fact that the two curvatures air, the only required experimental parameters, and small calibration errors cancel when the ratio is taken. To confirm the accuracy of the technique, it was tested on a 2.5 {mu}m thick film of single crystal silicon. Micromachined beams 1 mm long by 100 {mu} wide and plates 700 {mu}m by 700 {mu}m were coated with 35 nm of gold and the curvatures were measured with a scanning optical profilometer. For the orientation tested ([100] film normal, [011] beam axis, [0{bar 1}1] contraction direction) silicon`s Poisson`s ratio is 0.064, and the measured result was 0.066 {+-} 0.043. The uncertainty in this technique is due primarily to variation in the measured curvatures, and should range from {+-} 0.02 to 0.04 with proper measurement technique.
Date: April 18, 1996
Creator: Krulevitch, P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Modeling anomalous surface - wave propagation across the Southern Caspian basin

Description: The crust of the south Caspian basin consists of 15-25 km of low velocity, highly attenuating sediment overlying high velocity crystalline crust. The Moho depth beneath the basin is about 30 km as compared to about 50 km in the surrounding region. Preliminary modeling of the phase velocity curves shows that this thick sediments of the south Caspian basin are also under-lain by a 30-35 km thick crystalline crust and not by typical oceanic crust. This analysis also suggest that if the effect of the over-pressuring of the sediments is to reduce Poissons` ratio, the over-pressured sediments observed to approximately 5 km do not persist to great depths. It has been shown since 1960`s that the south Caspian basin blocks the regional phase Lg. Intermediate frequency (0.02-0.04 Hz) fundamental mode Raleigh waves propagating across the basin are also severely attenuated, but the low frequency surface waves are largely unaffected. This attenuation is observed along the both east-to-west and west-to-east great circle paths across the basin, and therefore it cannot be related to a seismograph site effect. We have modeled the response of surface waves in an idealized rendition of the south Caspian basin model using a hybrid normal mode / 2-D finite difference approach. To gain insight into the features of the basin which cause the anomalous surface wave propagation, we have varied parameters of the basin model and computed synthetic record sections to compare with the observed seismograms. We varied the amount of mantel up-warp, the shape of the boundaries, the thickness and shear wave Q of the sediments and mantle, and the depth of the water layer. Of these parameters, the intermediate frequency surface waves are most severely affected by the sediments thickness and shear wave attenuation. fundamental mode Raleigh wave phase velocities measure for paths crossing the ...
Date: January 9, 1998
Creator: Priestly, K.F.; Patton, H.J. & Schultz, C.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Imaging of CO{sub 2} injection during an enhanced-oil-recovery experiment

Description: A series of time-lapse seismic cross well and single well experiments were conducted in a diatomite reservoir to monitor the injection of CO{sub 2} into a hydrofracture zone, using P- and S-wave data. During the first phase the set of seismic experiments were conducted after the injection of water into the hydrofrac-zone. The set of seismic experiments was repeated after a time period of 7 months during which CO{sub 2} was injected into the hydrofractured zone. The issues to be addressed ranged from the detectability of the geologic structure in the diatomic reservoir to the detectability of CO{sub 2} within the hydrofracture. During the pre-injection experiment, the P-wave velocities exhibited relatively low values between 1700-1900 m/s, which decreased to 1600-1800 m/s during the post-injection phase (-5 percent). The analysis of the pre-injection S-wave data revealed slow S-wave velocities between 600-800 m/s, while the post-injection data revealed velocities between 500-700 m/s (-6 percent). These velocity estimates produced high Poisson ratios between 0.36 and 0.46 for this highly porous ({approx} 50 percent) material. Differencing post- and pre-injection data revealed an increase in Poisson ratio of up to 5 percent. Both, velocity and Poisson estimates indicate the dissolution of CO{sub 2} in the liquid phase of the reservoir accompanied by a pore-pressure increase. The results of the cross well experiments were corroborated by single well data and laboratory measurements on core data.
Date: April 29, 2003
Creator: Gritto, Roland; Daley, Thomas M. & Myer, Larry R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Investigation of Cable Insulation and Mechanical Properties of Niobium-Tin Composite

Description: As a part of the Fermilab high field Nb{sub 3}Sn dipole development program, various issues of magnet technology are being investigated. In cable insulation development, S-2 fiber glass sleeve and a new ceramic insulation developed by Composite Technology Development Inc. (CTD) were studied as a possible candidates. For each type of insulation, Nb{sub 3}Sn ten-stack samples were reacted and then vacuum impregnated with epoxy. Measurements of modulus of elasticity and Poisson�s ratio under compression were made at room temperature and at 4.2 K. For comparison, an epoxy impregnated NbTi composite was also tested.
Date: April 23, 1999
Creator: D.R. Chichili, T.T. Arkan and I. Terechkine
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Monte Carlo calculations of the anisotropic engineering moduli for crystalline RDX (0 GPa {le} p {le} 4 GPa)

Description: Isothermal-iosbaric Monte Carlo calculations are used in conjunction with an expression that relates the elastic stiffness tensor to the mean-square fluctuations of the strain tensor to obtain first principles predictions of the Young`s moduli, shear moduli, and Poisson`s ratios for room-temperature crystalline RDX. The results are based on numerical data obtained during previously reported calculations of the hydrostatic compression of RDX over the pressure domain 0 GPa {le} p {le} 4 GPa. Although there are no experimental data available for comparison, the predicted values of the engineering coefficients are in accord with general expectations for brittle molecular crystals. The calculations reported here are preliminary: more extensive Monte Carlo realizations are needed to yield well-converged predictions; these are underway for RDX and {beta}-HMX.
Date: December 1998
Creator: Bennett, C. M. & Sewell, T. D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Final Report for Grant "Direct Writing via Novel Aromatic Ladder Polymer Precursors"

Description: This report describes activities and findings under the above entitled grant. These pertain to the development of new synthetic routes to novel precursor polymers and oligomers that are applicable for conversion from electrical insulators to electrical conductors under the application of light (e.g. direct photolithographic writing)
Date: October 29, 2010
Creator: Gorman, C. B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Mechanical and bulk properties of intact rock collected in the laboratory in support of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

Description: A comprehensive laboratory investigation is determining the mechanical properties of tuffs for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). Most recently, experiments have been performed on tuff samples from a series of drill holes along the planned alignment of the Exploratory Study Facilities (ESF) north ramp. Unconfined compression and indirect tension experiments were performed and the results are being analyzed with the help of bulk property information. The results on samples from eight of the drill holes are presented. In general, the properties vary widely, but are highly dependent on the sample porosity. The developed relationships between mechanical properties and porosity are powerful tools in the effort to model the rock mass response of Yucca Mountain to the emplacement of the potential high-level radioactive waste repository.
Date: November 1994
Creator: Price, R. H.; Martin, R. J., III; Boyd, P. J. & Boinott, G. N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Microwave versus conventional sintering of silicon carbide tiles

Description: Silicon carbide is being evaluated as an armor material because of its lightweight, high-hardness, and excellent armor efficiency. However, one of the problems associated with silicon carbide is the high cost associated with achieving fully dense tiles. Full density requires either hot pressing and sintering or reaction bonding. Past efforts have shown that hot pressed tiles have a higher armor efficiency than those produced by reaction bonded sintering. An earlier stuy showed that the acoustic properties of fully-dense silicon carbide tiles were enhanced through the use of post-sintered microwave heat treatments. One of the least expensive forming techniques is to isostatically press-and-sinter. In this study, the authors have used microwave energy to densify silicon carbide green bodies. Microwave sintering has been demonstrated to be a very quick way to sinter ceramics such as alumina to exceptionally high densities. Previous work has shown that microwave post treatment of fully-dense reaction bonded silicon carbide tiles significantly improves the acoustic properties of the tiles. These properties include Poisson`s ratio, Young`s modulus, shear modulus, and bulk modulus.
Date: May 7, 1997
Creator: Kass, M. D.; Caughman, J. B. O.; Forrester, S. C. & Akerman, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Unconfined compression experiments on Topopah Spring Member tuff at 22{degrees}C and a strain rate of 10{sup {minus}9} s{sup {minus}1}: Data report; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

Description: Experiment results are presented for unconfined compressive strength and elastic moduli of tuffaceous rocks from Busted Butte near Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The data have been compiled for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project Site and Engineering Properties Data Base. Experiments were conducted on water-saturated specimens of the potential nuclear waste repository horizon Topopah Spring Member tuff (thermal/mechanical unit TSw2). The influence of strain rate on mechanical properties of the tuff was examined by loading six specimens in uniaxial compression at a strain rate of 10{sup {minus}9} s{sup {minus}1}. The experiments performed under ambient pressure and temperature conditions and conformed to Technical Procedure 91, titled ``Unconfined Compression Experiments at 22{degrees}C and a Strain Rate of 10{sup {minus}9} s{sup {minus}1}.`` The mean and standard deviation values of ultimate strength, Young`s modulus and Poisson`s ratio determined from these experiments are 85.4{plus_minus}21.7 MPa, 33.9{plus_minus}4.6 GPa, and 0.09{plus_minus}0.07, respectively.
Date: August 1, 1993
Creator: Martin, R.J. III; Boyd, P.J.; Noel, J.S. & Price, R.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The influence of strain rate and sample inhomogeneity on the moduli and strength of welded tuff

Description: A series of constant strain rate, unconfined compression experiments was performed on saturated welded tuff specimens collected from Busted Butte near Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Twenty specimens were loaded to failure at strain rates ranging from 10{sup {minus}9}s{sup {minus}1} to 10{sup {minus}3}s{sup {minus}1}, under ambient pressure and temperature conditions. The strength of the specimens showed a continuous decrease with decreasing strain rate between 10{sup {minus}9} s{sup {minus}1} and 10{sup {minus}5} s{sup {minus}1}. At the highest strain rate, 10{sup {minus}3} s{sup {minus}1}, strengths were less than those observed at 10{sup {minus}5} s{sup {minus}1}, likely due to hydrofracturing within the specimen at rapid loading rates. Reduction in strength, corresponding to the decrease in strain rate, is explained in terms of stress corrosion cracking. A detailed examination of six specimens tested at a strain rate of 10{sup {minus}9} s{sup {minus}1}, using acoustic wave velocities and CT scans, shows a correlation between the nature of the microstructure of the specimens and the observed strengths and elastic moduli.
Date: December 31, 1992
Creator: Martin, R.J. III; Boyd, P.J.; Noel, J.S. & Price, R.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Text for Mechanical and bulk properties in support of ESF design issues

Description: An intensive laboratory investigation is being performed to determine the mechanical properties of tuffs for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). Most recently, experiments are being performed on tuff samples from a series of drill holes along the proposed alignment of the Exploratory Study Facilities (ESF) north ramp. Unconfined compression and indirect tension experiments are being performed and the results are being analyzed with the help of bulk property information. The results on samples from five of the drill holes are presented here. In general, the properties vary widely, but are highly dependent on the sample porosity.
Date: July 1, 1994
Creator: Price, R.H.; Martin, R.J.; Boyd, P.J. & Noel, J.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Joint Cross Well and Single Well Seismic Studies at Lost Hills, California

Description: A series of time-lapse seismic cross well and single well experiments were conducted in a diatomite reservoir to monitor the injection of CO{sub 2} into a hydrofracture zone, based on P- and S-wave data. A high-frequency piezo-electric P-wave source and an orbital-vibrator S-wave source were used to generate waves that were recorded by hydrophones as well as three-component geophones. The injection well was located about 12 m from the source well. During the pre-injection phase water was injected into the hydrofrac-zone. The set of seismic experiments was repeated after a time interval of 7 months during which CO{sub 2} was injected into the hydrofractured zone. The questions to be answered ranged from the detectability of the geologic structure in the diatomic reservoir to the detectability of CO{sub 2} within the hydrofracture. Furthermore it was intended to determine which experiment (cross well or single well) is best suited to resolve these features. During the pre-injection experiment, the P-wave velocities exhibited relatively low values between 1700-1900 m/s, which decreased to 1600-1800 m/s during the post-injection phase (-5%). The analysis of the pre-injection S-wave data revealed slow S-wave velocities between 600-800 m/s, while the post-injection data revealed velocities between 500-700 m/s (-6%). These velocity estimates produced high Poisson ratios between 0.36 and 0.46 for this highly porous ({approx} 50%) material. Differencing post- and pre-injection data revealed an increase in Poisson ratio of up to 5%. Both, velocity and Poisson estimates indicate the dissolution of CO{sub 2} in the liquid phase of the reservoir accompanied by a pore-pressure increase. The single well data supported the findings of the cross well experiments. P- and S-wave velocities as well as Poisson ratios were comparable to the estimates of the cross well data. The cross well experiment did not detect the presence of the hydrofracture but appeared ...
Date: June 25, 2002
Creator: Gritto, Roland; Daley, Thomas M. & Myer, Larry R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Mechanistic modeling of high-temperature ordered intermetallics

Description: Bulk and defect properties and their relationships with mechanical behavior of transition-metal aluminides and silicides are reviewed on the basis of the recent progress in theoretical modeling studies. For Ti{sub 3}Al, the structural energy difference between the Ll{sub 2} and D0{sub 19} structures was found to be very small, which suggests the possibility of improving ductility through structural modification by ternary additions. While the driving force for the yield strength anomaly in Ni{sub 3}Al is believed to stem from the anisotropies of APB energies and crystal elasticity, that for Ni{sub 3}Si and Ni{sub 3}(Si,Ti) is not understood. Cleavage strength of Ti-rich TiAl is expected to be relatively low because of the deficiency of crack-tip plasticity.
Date: July 1995
Creator: Yoo, M. H. & Fu, C. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Effect of couple-stress on the pure bending of a prismatic bar

Description: An evaluation of the applicability of the couple-stress theory to the stress analysis of graphite structures is performed by solving a pure bending problem. The differences between solutions from the couple-stress theory and from the classical theory of elasticity are compared. It is found that the differences are sufficient to account for the inconsistencies which have often been observed between the classical elasticity theory and actual behavior of graphite under bend and tensile loadings. An experimental procedure to measure the material constants in the couple-stress theory is also suggested. The linear couple-stress theory, the origins of which go back to the turn of the last century, adds linear relations between couple-stresses and rotation gradients to the classical stress-strain law. By adopting the classical assumption that the plane cross section remains plane after deformation, the pure-bending problem is reduced to a plane couple-stress problem with traction-free boundary conditions. A general solution for an isotropic elastic prismatic bar under pure bending is then obtained using the Airy stress function and another stress function wich accounts for the couple-stresss. For a cylindrical bar, it reduces to a simple series solution. The moment-curvature and stress-curvature relations derived for a cylindrical bar from the general solution are used to examine the effect of couple-stresses. Numerical compilation of relations indicates that the couple stress parameters can be practically determined by measuring the moment-curvature ratio of various diametered specimens under bending. Although there is not sufficient data for such evaluation at present, it appears that the theory is consistent with the limited bend and tensile strength data of cylindrical specimens for H-451 graphite.
Date: February 1, 1981
Creator: Tzung, F.; Kao, B.; Ho, F. & Tang, P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

TRIAXIAL AND SHEAR TESTING OF SELECTED BACKFILL MATERIALS

Description: The Subsurface Performance Testing Section is performing tests in the Department of Energy's Atlas Facility to evaluate the performance of various backfill materials. Triaxial and shear tests were conducted on select backfill materials. The specific materials tested were: crushed tuff, overton sand, 4- 10 silica sand, 1/4'' dolostone/marble, and limestone. The objective of this report is to provide an estimated value for Poisson's ratio, determine internal friction angle, and stress-strain modulus of the backfill materials that were tested. These basic parameters are necessary for the selection of a backfill material to be included in the repository. This report transmits the results in both hardcopy and electronic formats plus describes the methodology and interpretation of the results. No conclusions will be drawn about the test results, as this will be the purview of other reports. The scope of this report is to use the triaxial and shear testing information and calculate, the internal friction angle, stress-strain modulus, and provide an estimate of Poisson's ratio (Sowers 1979, p. 199) of the selected backfill materials. Standard laboratory procedures, mentioned in Section 2 of this report, were used.
Date: August 7, 2000
Creator: Kramer, N. E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Carbon Characterization Laboratory Report

Description: The newly completed Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Carbon Characterization Laboratory (CCL) is located in Lab-C20 of the Idaho National Laboratory Research Center. This laboratory was established under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project to support graphite research and development activities. The CCL is designed to characterize and test carbon-based materials such as graphite, carbon-carbon composites, and silicon-carbide composite materials. The laboratory is fully prepared to measure material properties for nonirradiated carbon-based materials. Plans to establish the laboratory as a radiological facility within the next year are definitive. This laboratory will be modified to accommodate irradiated materials, after which it can be used to perform material property measurements on both irradiated and nonirradiated carbon-based material. Instruments, fixtures, and methods are in place for preirradiation measurements of bulk density, thermal diffusivity, coefficient of thermal expansion, elastic modulus, Young’s modulus, Shear modulus, Poisson ratio, and electrical resistivity. The measurement protocol consists of functional validation, calibration, and automated data acquisition.
Date: March 1, 2009
Creator: Swank, David; Windes, William; Haggard, D.C.; Rohrbaugh, David & Moore, Karen
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Sound velocity and elastic moduli in $alpha$-plutonium at pressures to 50 KBAR

Description: The elastic moduli, bulk modulus, and shear modulus were measured in polycrystalline $alpha$-plutonium at pressures to 50 Kbar. An ultrasonic technique enabled measurement of both longitudinal and shear wave velocities in a girdled-piston high pressure cell. The average pressure derivatives were 14.3 and 4.3 m/s/kbar for the longitudinal and shear velocities, respectively. Bulk and shear moduli were calculated from the sound velocity data. The average pressure derivatives for the moduli were 14 and 3.5, respectively. Poisson's ratio was calculated directly from the ratio of longitudinal and shear velocities and increased from 0.17 at atmospheric pressure to 0.28 at 50 kbar. (auth)
Date: January 1, 1974
Creator: Merz, M.D.; Hammer, J.H. & Kjarmo, H.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Mechanical properties of alpha-neptunium: hardness and elastic moduli

Description: A study of hardness and elastic moduli of $alpha$-neptunium was conducted. The hardnesses at 203, 240 and 298$sup 0$K were 418, 395, and 346 dph, respectively. The high hardnesses were attributed to the low symmetry of $alpha$-neptunium and the large number of twins in the microstructure. Unusual deformation twinning and slip were observed near the hardness indentations. A second twinning mode, in addition to the reported (110) mode, was suggested by the observations. This twinning was characterized by very narrow, straight twins in contrast to the wide, highly curved twins observed previously in polycrystalline $alpha$-neptunium. An ultrasonic method was used to measure sound velocities at 77 to 373$sup 0$K. Elastic moduli and Poisson's ratio were calculated from the sound velocities. The room temperature values for the moduli were: B = 11.7 x 10$sup 11$ dyne/cm$sup 2$; G = 8.28 x 10$sup 11$ dyne/cm$sup 2$; and sigma = 0.22. The values were very nearly the same as the reported moduli of $alpha$-uranium. (auth)
Date: January 1, 1974
Creator: Merz, M.D. & Kjarmo, H.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Irradiation-induced creep in graphite: a review

Description: Data on irradiation-induced creep in graphite published since 1972 are reviewed. Sources include restrained shrinkage tests conducted at Petten, the Netherlands, tensile creep experiments with continuous strain registration at Petten and Grenoble, France, and controlled load tests with out-of-reactor strain measurement performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Petten, and in the United Kingdom. The data provide reasonable confirmation of the linear viscoelastic creep model with a recoverable transient strain component followed by a steady-state strain component, except that the steady-state creep coefficient must be treated as a function of neutron fluence and is higher for tensile loading than for compressive loading. The total transient creep strain is approximately equal to the preceding elastic strain. No temperature dependence of the transient creep parameters has been demonstrated.
Date: August 1, 1981
Creator: Price, R.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Thermal degradation of concrete in the temperature range from ambient to 315{degree} C (600{degree} F). Revision 10/96

Description: This report is concerned with determining the effect of elevated temperatures on the behavior of concrete. Emphasis is placed on quantifying the degree of potential degradation of the physical properties of concrete in high-level waste storage tanks. The temperature elevation range of interest is from ambient to 315 C (600 F). The literature has been reviewed to examine the applicable experimental data and quantify the degradation in the concrete and reinforcing steel. Since many variables and test conditions control the results in the data base, upper and lower bounds of the degraded properties at temperatures applicable to the environments of the storage tanks are summarized and presented in explicit forms. For properties with large data bases, a normal logarithmic distribution of the data is assumed and a statistical analysis is carried out to find the mean and 84% values of the degraded property in the temperature range of interest. Such results are useful in assessing the effect of elevated temperatures on the structural behavior of the tanks. In addition, the results provide the technical basis for a parametric study that may be necessary to investigate the thermal aspects of the structural integrity of the tanks. 50 refs., 23 figs.
Date: October 1, 1996
Creator: Kassir, M.K.; Bandyopadhyay, K.K. & Reich, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation of tuff as a waste isolation medium

Description: Tuff is of interest for use as an isolation medium for high heat producing wastes because it provides highly sorptive minerals and suitable thermomechanical properties. Also, tuff is widespread in areas that offer long and deep groundwater flow paths. The occurrence and geologic/hydrologic setting of tuff are discussed. The properties of the rock are discussed and compared with other isolation media. The favorable and unfavorable aspects are presented. Also, unresolved issues are discussed along with the investigative program for addressing these issues.
Date: December 31, 1979
Creator: Tyler, L.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Concrete material characterization reinforced concrete tank structure Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility

Description: The purpose of this report is to document the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF) Project position on the concrete mechanical properties needed to perform design/analysis calculations for the MWTF secondary concrete structure. This report provides a position on MWTF concrete properties for the Title 1 and Title 2 calculations. The scope of the report is limited to mechanical properties and does not include the thermophysical properties of concrete needed to perform heat transfer calculations. In the 1970`s, a comprehensive series of tests were performed at Construction Technology Laboratories (CTL) on two different Hanford concrete mix designs. Statistical correlations of the CTL data were later generated by Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL). These test results and property correlations have been utilized in various design/analysis efforts of Hanford waste tanks. However, due to changes in the concrete design mix and the lower range of MWTF operating temperatures, plus uncertainties in the CTL data and PNL correlations, it was prudent to evaluate the CTL data base and PNL correlations, relative to the MWTF application, and develop a defendable position. The CTL test program for Hanford concrete involved two different mix designs: a 3 kip/in{sup 2} mix and a 4.5 kip/in{sup 2} mix. The proposed 28-day design strength for the MWTF tanks is 5 kip/in{sup 2}. In addition to this design strength difference, there are also differences between the CTL and MWTF mix design details. Also of interest, are the appropriate application of the MWTF concrete properties in performing calculations demonstrating ACI Code compliance. Mix design details and ACI Code issues are addressed in Sections 3.0 and 5.0, respectively. The CTL test program and PNL data correlations focused on a temperature range of 250 to 450 F. The temperature range of interest for the MWTF tank concrete application is 70 to 200 F.
Date: March 3, 1995
Creator: Winkel, B.V.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department