17 Matching Results

Search Results

Advanced search parameters have been applied.

Redox Reactions of Metalloporphyrins and their Role in Catalyzed Reduction of Carbon Dioxide

Description: Pulse radiolysis and laser photolysis are used to study redox processes of metalloporphyrins and related complexes in order to evaluate these light absorbing molecules as sensitizers and intermediates in solar energy conversion schemes. The main thrust of the current studies is to investigate the role of reduced metalloporphyrins as intermediates in the catalyzed reduction of carbon dioxide. Studies involve cobalt and iron porphyrins, phthalocyanines, corroles, and corrins as homogeneous catalysts for reduction of carbon dioxide in solution. The main aim is to understand the mechanisms of these photochemical schemes in order to facilitate their potential utilization.
Date: September 1, 2002
Creator: Neta, P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Multilayer self-assemblies as electronic and optical materials

Description: The layer-by-layer growth of film structures consisting of sequential depositions of oppositely charged polymers and macrocycles (ring-shaped molecules) have been constructed using molecular self-assembly techniques. These self-assembled thin films were characterized with X-ray reflectometry, which yielded (1) the average electron density, (2) the average thicknesses, and (3) the roughness of the growth surface of the self-assembled multilayer of macrocycles and polymers. These observations suggest that inorganic-organic interactions play an important role during the initial stages of thin-film growth, but less so as the thin film becomes thicker. Optical absorption techniques were also used to characterize the self-assembled multilayers. Phorphyrin and phthalocyanine derivatives were chosen as one of the building blocks of the self-assembled multilayers because of their interesting optical properties.
Date: December 31, 1997
Creator: Li, D.; Luett, M.; Shi, X. & Fitzsimmons, M.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Structure-function relationships of second hyperpolarizabilities in two-dimensional molecules

Description: The enhancement of the third order susceptibilities X{sup (3)} and second order molecular hyperpolarizabilities <{gamma}> in a series of covalently stacked dimer and trimer macrocycles (SiPc and SiNc) was observed through the phase conjugated signals from DFWM measurements at both 1064 and 532 nm. The FWHM of the phase conjugated signals at 532 nm is much smaller than those at 1064 nm and those of the reference compound CS{sub 2}. The <{gamma}> values at both wavelengths as a function of number of the monomer units (n) have an approximate n{sup 3} dependence, differing only in the scaling constant. The origin of such enhancement is discussed and compared to those in one-dimensional {pi}-conjugated systems.
Date: July 1, 1995
Creator: Chen, L.X.; Mandal, B.K. & Bihari, B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES OF ORGANIC SOLIDS. I. KINETICS AND MECHANISMOF CONDUCTIVITY OF METAL-FREE PHTHALOCYANINE

Description: Techniques involving the use of high-intensity short-duration light pulses have been applied t o the study of the kinetics of photoconductivity in films of metal-free phthalocyanine. These experiments, in conjunction with measurements of steady-state photoconductivity, are consistent with the following scheme. The principal route for the formation of charge carriers is via the first excited singlet state, although the lowest triplet state can, t o some extent, contribute to charge - carrier production. The mobility of the carriers is low and is concentration-dependent, being lower at higher carrier concentration. The decay of the photocurrent is the result of a diffusion-limited bimolecular recombination, with a capture radius of approximately one molecular diameter. The experiments indicate that carriers produced thermally in the dark do not interact with light-produced carriers.
Date: July 29, 1959
Creator: Tollin, Gordon; Kearns, David R. & Calvin, Melvin.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES OF ORGANIC SOLIDS. II: EFFECTS OF ADDEDELECTRON ACCEPTOR ON METAL-FREE PHTHALOCYANINE

Description: The addition of ortho-chloranil to the surface of films of metal-free phthalocyanine has been found (a) to increase the dark conductivity of such films by as much as 10{sup 7}, (b) to increase the steady-state photoconductivity by as much as 10{sup 5}, and (c) to result in the formation of unpaired electrons whose concentration decreases reversibly as a result of illumination. These systems exhibit a light-induced polarization, the phthalocyanine layer becoming more positive with respect t o the ortho-chloranil layer. Kinetic studies demonstrate that, upon illumination, a single process (time constant = 40 seconds) results in the increase in conductivity, the decrease in unpaired spins, and the increase in polarization. The results are consistent with the following scheme. An electron transfer from phthalocyanine to ortho-chloranil occurs in the dark at room temperature, producing holes in the phthalocyanine layer and ortho-chloranil negative ion radicals (high conductivity, ESR signal). Illumination results in the transfer of an electron from an excited phthalocyanine molecule to the ortho-chloranil negative ion, producing further phthalocyanine holes and ortho-chloranil double-negative ion (increase in conductivity, increase in polarization, decrease in ESR signal). By equating spin concentration with charge - carrier concentration (phthalocyanine holes) it is possible to calculate a mobility of 10{sup -4} cm{sup 2}/volt/sec for holes in the phthalocyanine layer. By use of this value, a quantum yield of unity is calculated for the production of charge carriers in doped phthalocyanine. The experiments indicate a quantum yield of less than 10-1 for undoped phthalocyanine. The over-all results of adding a strong electron acceptor to a film of phthalocyanine are thus t o (a) produce charge carriers in the dark, (b) increase the quantum yield for production of charge carriers by light, and (c) increase charge-carrier lifetime.
Date: July 29, 1959
Creator: Kearns, David R.; Tollin, Gordon & Calvin, Melvin
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Construction of artificial pigment-protein antennae

Description: Photosynthesis is a complex process which results in the conversion of solar radiation into chemical energy. This chemical energy is then used as the free energy source for all living organisms. In its basic form, photosynthesis can be described as the light-activated synthesis of carbohydrates from the simple molecules of water and carbon dioxide: 6H{sub 2}O + 6 CO{sub 2} light C{sub 6}H{sub 12}O{sub 6} + 6 O{sub 2} This basic mechanism actually requires numerous reaction steps. The two primary steps being: the capture of light by pigment molecules in light-harvesting antenna complexes and the transfer of this captured energy to the so-called photochemical reaction center. While the preferred pathway for energy absorbed by the chromophores in the antenna complexes is transfer to the reaction center, energy can be lost to competing processes such as internal conversion or radiative decay. Therefore, the energy transfer must be rapid, typically on the order of picoseconds, to successfully compete. The focus of the present work is on the construction of light-harvesting antenna complexes incorporating modular pigment-proteins.
Date: January 10, 1997
Creator: Sibbald, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Electroreduction of nitrate ions in concentrated sodium hydroxide solutions at lead, zinc, nickel, and phthalocyanine-modified electrodes

Description: The electrochemical reduction of nitrate in strongly alkaline solution has been studied using nickel, lead, zinc, and iron cathodes. Intermediate formation of nitrate ion and ammonia product was observed for all electrode materials. Coating a nickel sponge electrode with phthalocyanine renders it less active toward nitrate reduction, while iron electrodes appear to be activated. Electrolysis between a lead cathode and a nickel anode is an efficient means of removing nitrate from strongly alkaline solutions. Electrode pretreatment and solution conditions were chosen to correspond to those that might be encountered in practical applications, for example, the cleanup of radioactive waste solutions.
Date: December 31, 1987
Creator: Li, H.; Chambers, J.Q. & Hobbs, D.T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Probing Properties of Glassy Water and Other Liquids with Site Selective Spectroscopies

Description: The standard non-photochemical hole burning (NPHB) mechanism, which involves phonon-assisted tunneling in the electronically excited state, was originally proposed to explain the light-induced frequency change of chemically stable molecules in glassy solids at liquid helium temperatures by this research group more than two decades ago. The NPHB mechanism was then further elucidated and the concept of intrinsic to glass configurational relaxation processes as pre-mediating step to the hole burning process was introduced. The latter provided the theoretical basis for NPHB to evolve into a powerful tool probing the dynamics and nature of amorphous media, which aside from ''simple'' inorganic glasses may include also ''complex'' biological systems such as living cells and cancerous/normal tissues. Presented in this dissertation are the experimental and theoretical results of hole burning properties of aluminum phthalocyanine tetrasulphonate (APT) in several different matrices: (1) hyperquenched glassy water (HGW); (2) cubic ice (I{sub c}); and (3) water confined into poly(2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate) (poly-HEMA). In addition, results of photochemical hole burning (PHB) studies obtained for phthalocyanine tetrasulphonate (PcT) in HGW and free base phthalocyanine (Pc) in ortho-dichlorobenzene (DCB) glass are reported. The goal of this dissertation was to provide further evidence supporting the NPHB mechanism and to provide more insight that leads to a better understanding of the kinetic events (dynamics) in glasses, and various dynamical processes of different fluorescent chromorphores in various amorphous solids and the liquid that exist above the glass transition temperature (T{sub g}). The following issues are addressed in detail: (1) time evolution of hole being burned under different conditions and in different hole burning systems; (2) temperature dependent hole profile; and (3) the structure/dynamics of water in confined space, which has been studied, in part because of the importance of non-freezable water in biological systems.
Date: August 12, 2005
Creator: Dang, Nhan Chuong
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development of inexpensive metal macrocyclic complexes for use in fuel cells

Description: Several metal macrocyclic complexes were synthesized for use as catalysts in fuel cells. An initial evaluation of their ability to catalyze the fuel cell reactions were completed. Based on this initial evaluation, one metal macrocyclic catalyst was selected and long-term stability testing in a fuel cell was initiated. The fuel cell employing this catalyst was operated continuously for one year with little signs of catalyst degradation. The effect of synthetic reformates on the performance of the catalyst in the fuel cell environment also demonstrated high tolerance of this catalyst for common contaminants and poisons.
Date: January 1, 1998
Creator: Doddapaneni, N.; Ingersoll, D.; Kosek, J.A.; Cropley, C.C. & Hamdan, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Direct catalytic conversion of methane and light hydrocarbon gases. Quarterly report No. 1, October 16, 1986--January 15, 1987

Description: The United States will need to be able to convert coal to liquid fuels should current supplies be interrupted. The indirect method for producing fuel liquids is the gasification of the coal to synthesis gas (syngas) followed by Fischer-Tropsch synthesis to convert syngas to hydrocarbons. However, both the gasifier and the FTS processes result in the production of methane and/or light hydrocarbon by-product that negatively affect the economics of the production of liquid fuel from coal. The goal of SRI`s research is thus to develop catalysts that directly convert methane and light hydrocarbons to intermediates that can, as economics dictate, be subsequently converted either to liquid fuels or value-added chemicals. SRI project 2678 is exploring two approaches to achieving the stated goal. The first approach consists of developing advanced catalysts for reforming methane. We will prepare the catalysts by reacting organometallic complexes of transition metals (Fe, Ru, Rh, and Re) with zeolitic and rare earth exchanged zeolitic supports to produce surfaceconfined metal complexes in the zeolite pores. We will then decompose the organometallic complexes to obtain very stable, highly dispersed catalysts. Our second approach entails synthesizing the porphyrin and phthalocyanine complexes of Cr, Mn, Ru, Fe, and/or Co within the pores of zeolitic supports for use as selective oxidation catalysts for methane and light hydrocarbons. We will test the catalysts in a fixed-bed isothermal microreactor in a downflow mode at {approximately}100 psi. During the first quarter of this project, we have concentrated on methane oxidation to methanol. We have synthesized phthalocyanine oxidation catalysts containing different metals (Co, Fe, and Ru) within zeolite pores. our examination of their ability to oxidize methane to methanol has indicated preliminary positive results.
Date: February 23, 1987
Creator: Wilson, R.B. Jr. & Chan, Yee Wai
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Advanced separation technology for flue gas cleanup. Quarterly technical report No. 15

Description: The objective of this work is to develop a novel system for regenerable SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} scrubbing of flue gas that focuses on (1) a novel method for regeneration of spent SO{sub 2} scrubbing liquor and (2) novel chemistry for reversible absorption of NO{sub x}. In addition, high efficiency hollow fiber contactors (HFC) are proposed as the devices for scrubbing the SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} from the flue gas. The system will be designed to remove more than 95% of the SO{sub x} and more than 75% of the NO{sub x} from flue gases typical of pulverized coal-fired power plants at a cost that is at least 20% less than combined wet limestone scrubbing of SO{sub x} and selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x}. In addition, the process will make only marketable byproducts, if any (no waste streams). Our approach is to reduce the capital cost by using high efficiency hollow fiber devices for absorbing and desorbing the SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}. We will also introduce new process chemistry to minimize traditionally well-known problems with SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} absorption and desorption. For example, we will extract the SO{sub 2} from the aqueous scrubbing liquor into an oligomer of dimethylaniline to avoid the problem of organic liquid losses in the regeneration of the organic liquid. Our novel chemistry for scrubbing NO{sub x} will consist of water soluble phthalocyanine compounds invented by SRI and also of polymeric forms of Fe{sup ++} complexes similar to traditional NO{sub x} scrubbing media. Finally, the arrangement of the absorbers is in cassette (stackable) form so that the NO{sub x} absorber can be on top of the SO{sub x} absorber. This cassette (stacked) arrangement makes it possible for the SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} scrubbing chambers to be separate without incurring ...
Date: February 1, 1996
Creator: Bhown, A.S.; Pakala, N.; Riggs, T. & Tagg, T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Advanced separation technology for flue gas cleanup. Quarterly technical report No. 14

Description: The objective of this work is to develop a novel system for regenerable SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} scrubbing of flue gas that focuses on (a) a novel method for regeneration of spent SO{sub 2} scrubbing liquor and (b) novel chemistry for reversible absorption of NO{sub x}. In addition, high efficiency hollow fiber contactors (HFC) are proposed as the devices for scrubbing the SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} from the flue gas. The system will be designed to remove more than 95% of the SO{sub x} and more than 75% of the NO{sub x} from flue gases typical of pulverized coal-fired power plants at a cost that is at least 20% less than combined wet limestone scrubbing of SO{sub x} and selective catalytic reduction NO{sub x}. In addition, the process will make only marketable byproducts, if any (no waste streams). During the third quarter of 1995, we continued work on Task 8, integrated NO{sub x} life tests. We also obtained some mass transfer data on Task 9, performance of scalable modules. In Task 8, we gathered additional 400 hours of NO{sub x} absorption/desorption data. We also presented the data on NO{sub x} absorption/desorption behavior over cumulative time to date. the performance indicates unchanged reversible characteristics of Co(II) phthalocyanine solution. Therefore, we believe that NO{sub x} absorption/desorption chemistry is robust. In Task 9, we experimentally observed the channeling of liquid flow due to poor design of previous rectangular modules. Newly obtained welded rectangular modules out-performed previous modules. We also presented SO{sub 2} absorption data using different Na{sub 2}SO{sub 3} concentrations. The SO{sub 2} absorption seem to be dependent on liquid flow rate, a rather surprising result compared to earlier results. Apparatus for combined absorption/desorption of SO{sub 2} in rectangular modules is also given in this report.
Date: November 1, 1995
Creator: Bhown, A.S.; Pakala, N.; Riggs, T.; Tagg, T.; Kirkar, K.K.; Majumdar, S. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Advanced separation technology for flue gas cleanup: Quarterly technical report No. 16, January 1996--March 1996

Description: The objective of this work is to develop a novel system for regenerable SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} scrubbing of flue gas that focuses on (a) a novel method for regeneration of spent SO{sub 2} scrubbing liquor and (b) novel chemistry for reversible absorption of NO{sub x}. In addition, high efficiency hollow fiber contactors (BFC) are proposed as the devices for scrubbing the SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} from the flue gas. The system will be designed to remove more than 95% of the SO{sub x} and more than 75% of the NO{sub x} from flue gases typical of pulverized coal-fired power plants at a cost that is at least 20% less than combined wet limestone scrubbing of SO{sub x} and selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x}. In addition, the process will make only marketable byproducts, if any (no waste streams). The major cost item in existing technology is capital investment. Therefore, our approach is to reduce the capital cost by using high efficiency hollow fiber devices for absorbing and desorbing the SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}. We will also introduce new process chemistry to minimize traditionally well-known problems with SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} absorption and desorption. For example, we will extract the SO{sub 2} from the aqueous scrubbing liquor into an oligomer of dimethylaniline to avoid the problem of organic liquid losses in the regeneration of the organic liquid. Our novel chemistry for scrubbing NO{sub x} will consist of water soluble plithalocyanine compounds invented by SRI and also of polymeric forms of Fe{sup ++} complexes similar to traditional NO{sub x} scrubbing media described in the open literature. Our past work with the phthalocyanine compounds, used as sensors for NO and NO{sub 2} in flue gases, shows that these compounds bind NO and NO{sub 2} reversibly and with no ...
Date: June 1, 1996
Creator: Bhown, A.S.; Bahman, A.; Sirkar, K.K.; Majumdar, S. & Bhaumick, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Direct catalytic conversion of methane and light hydrocarbon gases. Quarterly report No. 7, April 16, 1988--July 15, 1988

Description: The goal of this research is to develop catalysts that directly convert methane and light hydrocarbons to intermediates that later can be converted to either liquid fuels or value-added chemicals, as economics dictate. During this reporting period, much of our effort focused on investigating the stability of the methane reforming catalysts (Task 2) with respect to storage time. Many of these catalysts demonstrated lessened activity when they were reexamined up to 18 months after they ere first synthesized and tested. We also synthesized and tested two new phthalocyanines supported on magnesia (MgO) for examination in the methane oxidation reaction. We reexamined many of the hexaruthenium and tetraruthenium clusters which had been supported on zeolite Y, zeolite 5A, alumina or magnesia. These reexaminations were conducted at relatively slow flow rates (15 ml/min), since previous studies had shown that the lower flow rates maximized the conversion of methane in this reaction. In every case, the catalyst exhibited diminished activity compared to the earlier runs. In addition, the selectivity of the catalysts changed as well; relatively less C{sub 2} and no C{sub 6} was observed in the reactions conducted during this reporting period. In the previous technical report we reported that palladium tetrasulfophthalocyanine (PDTSPC) supported on MgO exhibited exceptional activity in the methane oxidation reaction; it produced ethane at much lower temperatures than previously reported in the literature. We synthesized two close analogues of this compound, one with a different metal (nickel) from the same family as palladium, and the other with a different substituent (carboxylic acid rather than sulfonic acid) on the phthalocyanine ring. Both of these complexes were supported on magnesia, and tested for activity. The nickel complex displayed some activity, producing only carbon dioxide and water.
Date: August 31, 1988
Creator: Wilson, R.B. Jr.; Chan, Yee Wai & Posin, B.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Direct catalytic conversion of methane and light hydrocarbon gases. Quarterly report No. 3, April 16--July 15, 1987

Description: The goal of this research is to develop catalysts that directly convert methane and light hydrocarbons to intermediates that can, as economics dictate, be subsequently converted either to liquid fuels or value-added chemicals. In this program we are exploring two approaches to developing such catalysts. The first approach consists of developing advanced catalysts for reforming methane. We will prepare the catalysts by reacting organometallic complexes of transition metals (Fe, Ru, Rh, and Re) with zeolitic and rare-earth-exchanged zeolitic supports to produce surface-confined metal complexes in the zeolite pores. Our second approach entails synthesizing the porphyrin and phthalocyanine complexes of Cr, Mn, Ru, Fe, and/or Co within the pores of zeolitic supports for use as selective oxidation catalysts for methane and light hydrocarbons. During this reporting period, we concentrated on synthesizing and testing methane oxidation catalysts using the automated GC sampling system. We modified our preparation method of zeolite-encapsulated phthalocyanines (PC). The catalysts have higher complex loading, and the uncomplexed metal ions were back-exchanged by sodium ions (to remove any uncomplexed metal ions). Four metal ions were used: cobalt, iron, ruthenium, and manganese. We also synthesized four zeolite-encapsulated tetraphenylporphyrin (TPP) complexes using the same metals. These catalysts were tested for methane oxidation in the temperature range from 300{degrees} to 500{degrees}C at 50 psig pressure. The RUPC, COTPP, and MNTPP showed activity toward the formation of methanol. The RUPC zeolite gave the best methanol yield. The methane conversion was 4.8%, and the selectivity to methanol is 11.3% at 375{degrees}C. Again, the major products are carbon dioxide and water in every catalyst we tested during this reporting period.
Date: August 28, 1987
Creator: Wilson, R.B. Jr. & Chan, Yee Wai
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Advanced separation technology for flue gas cleanup. Quarterly technical report number 13, April--June 1995

Description: The objective of this work is to develop a novel system for regenerable SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} scrubbing of flue gas that focuses on (a) a novel method for regeneration of spent SO{sub 2} scrubbing liquor and (b) novel chemistry for reversible absorption of NO{sub x}. In addition, high efficiency hollow fiber contactors (HFC) are proposed as the devices for scrubbing the SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} from the flue gas. The system will be designed to remove more than 95% of the SO{sub x} and more than 75% of the NO{sub x} from flue gases typical of pulverized coal-fired power plants at a cost that is at least 20% less than combined wet limestone scrubbing of SO{sub x} and selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x}. In addition, the process will make only marketable byproducts, if any (no waste streams). Work will be conducted in a 60-month period (5/92 to 4/97), encompassing 16 tasks. In Task 8, (Integrated NO{sub x} life tests), the authors have presented the modified experimental arrangement for testing the efficacy of Co(II)-phthalocyanine solution for NO{sub x} absorption as well as desorption over extended periods of time. This arrangement allows them to automatically acquire data and control process parameters. They obtained absorption/desorption data over a period of 140 hours. The data exhibits average NO removal rates of 50%. In order to increase the overall efficiency of the system, they have designed and built a new desorption section with increased mass transfer area. In Task 9, (scalable modules), the authors presented the design details of the rectangular scalable modules. Also, they tested the apparatus with SO{sub 2}/water system. The performance of the device was affected by varying either gas or water flow rates. SO{sub 2} removal rates close to 90% were obtained at 20 SLPM gas flow ...
Date: November 1, 1995
Creator: Bhown, A.; Pakala, N.; Riggs, T.; Tagg, T.; Sirkar, K.K.; Majumdar, S. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Direct catalytic conversion of methane and light hydrocarbon gases. Quarterly report No. 6, January 16, 1988--April 15, 1988

Description: The goal of this research is to develop catalysts that directly convert methane and light hydrocarbons to intermediates that later can be converted to either liquid fuels or value-added chemicals, as economics dictate. During this reporting period, we synthesized several phthalocyanine catalysts supported on magnesia (MgO) in Task 3. In Task 4 we have tested these catalysts for oxidation of methane and did a number of blank experiments to determine the cause of the low methanol yield we have observed. Magnesia supported catalysts were prepared by first synthesizing the various metal tetrasulfophthalocyanines (TSPCs), converting them to the acid form, and then supporting these complexes on a basic support (MgO) by a neutralization reaction. The metals used were Ru, Pd, Cu, Fe, Co, Mn, and Mo. CoTSPC was also synthesized in zeolite Y using our standard template techniques described in Quarterly Report No. 1. These complexes were examined for catalytic activity in the oxidation of methane. The PdTSPC/MgO had greater activity, and oxidized some of the methane (selectivity of 2.8% from the methane oxidized at 375{degrees}C) to ethane. This is a much lower temperature for this reaction than previously reported in the literature. We also examined the reactivity of various components of the system in the oxidation of the product methanol. The reactor showed some activity for the oxidation of methanol to carbon dioxide. When zeolite or magnesia were added, this activity increased. The magnesia oxidized most of the methanol to carbon dioxide, while the zeolite reduced some of the methanol to hydrocarbons. With oxygen in the feed gas stream (i.e., the conditions of our methane oxidation), a very large fraction of the methanol was oxidized to carbon dioxide when passed over magnesia. From this, we can conclude that any methanol formed in the oxidation of methane would probably be destroyed ...
Date: May 20, 1988
Creator: Wilson, R.B. Jr.; Chan, Yee Wai & Posin, B.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department