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Bulk and Interfacial Effects on Density in Polymer Nanocomposites

Description: The barrier properties of polymers are a significant factor in determining the shelf or device lifetime in polymer packaging. Nanocomposites developed from the dispersion of nanometer thick platelets into a host polymer matrix have shown much promise. The magnitude of the benefit on permeability has been different depending on the polymer investigated or the degree of dispersion of the platelet in the polymer. In this dissertation, the effect of density changes in the bulk and at the polymer-platelet interface on permeability of polymer nanocomposites is investigated. Nanocomposites of nylon, PET, and PEN were processed by extrusion. Montmorillonite layered silicate (MLS) in a range of concentrations from 1 to 5% was blended with all three resins. Dispersion of the MLS in the matrix was investigated by using one or a combination of X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Variation in bulk density via crystallization was analyzed using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and polarized optical microscopy. Interfacial densification was investigated using force modulation atomic force microscopy (AFM) and ellipsometry. Mechanical properties are reported. Permeability of all films was measured in an in-house built permeability measurement system. The effect of polymer orientation and induced defects on permeability was investigated using biaxially stretched, small and large cycle fatigue samples of PET and nylon nanocomposites. The effect of annealing in nylon and nanocomposites was also investigated. The measured permeability was compared to predicted permeability by considering the MLS as an ideal dispersion and the matrix as a system with concentration dependent crystallinity.
Date: May 2007
Creator: Sahu, Laxmi Kumari
Partner: UNT Libraries

Capillary Permeability to Narrow-Range Macromolecular Dextrans at Normal and Hypobaric Pressures

Description: In view of its varied concepts and interpretations, and because of the discrepancies produced by the previous utilization of polydispersed dextrans, a study using extremely narrow-range molecular weight dextran fractions was initiated to reevaluate and consolidate some of the aspects of capillary permeability. A portion of the study was performed under decreased barometric pressure in order to clarify further some of the mechanisms involved in particulate transfer across the capillary endothelial membranes. Gel filtration procedures augmented the study as an assessment of the polydispersity effects of the dextrans employed.
Date: December 1972
Creator: Norris, John Anthony
Partner: UNT Libraries

Parametric forms and the inductive response of a permeable conducting sphere

Description: At early time, the time derivative of the response of isolated conductive bodies to step function excitation decays as t-1/2 (under a quasi-static approximation). One simple parametric form for the response with correct early time behavior is k'(1 + t1/2/a1/2)-beta e-t/gamma. For a conducting magnetic sphere, parameter values are determined from the high and low frequency limit responses, together with two time scales taken from the form of the analytic solution. Parameters alpha and gamma correspond to transition times, for transition from an early time t-1/2 derivative response, and to late time exponential decay. For conducting spheres with high permeability, increasing the permeability moves the transition from early time behavior earlier in inverse proportion to the relative permeability mu r, and increases the time constant of the late time decay in proportion to mu r. Magnitude parameter k' corresponds to the difference between high frequency and low frequency limit responses.
Date: December 11, 2003
Creator: Smith, J. Torquil; Morrison, H. Frank & Becker, Alex
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Investigation of the Suitability of Prepakt Concrete for Mass and Reinforced Concrete Structures: Appendices A and B

Description: Introduction: Three matters discussed in the main report on the investigation of the suitability of Prepakt concrete for mass and reinforced concrete structures, issued in October 1951, required further study. These matters are (a) the properties of Alfesil, (b) the permeability of Prepakt concrete, and (c) the resistance of Prepakt concrete to natural weathering.
Date: August 1954
Creator: Waterways Experiment Station (U.S.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Effects of n-Decenylsuccinic Acid (n-DSA) and It's Monomethyl Ester (m-MDSA) on Water and Ion Flux in Isolated Roots

Description: The purpose of this study was (1) to measure the changes in water flux in isolated roots exposed to n-DSA and its mono-methly ester (m-MDSA) using a photometric technique in the absence of an externally applied suction and (2) to measure the flux of Na and K in similarly treated roots using a flame photometric method.
Date: January 1969
Creator: Teng, Yao-sheng
Partner: UNT Libraries

User's Guide for Hysteretic Capillary Pressure and Relative Permeability Functions in iTOUGH2

Description: The precursor of TOUGH2, TOUGH, was originally developed with non-hysteretic characteristic curves. Hysteretic capillary pressure functions were implemented in TOUGH in the late 1980s by Niemi and Bodvarsson (1988), and hysteretic capillary pressure and relative permeability functions were added to iTOUGH2 about ten years later by Finsterle et al. (1998). Recently, modifications were made to the iTOUGH2 hysteretic formulation to make it more robust and efficient (Doughty, 2007). Code development is still underway, with the ultimate goal being a hysteretic module that fits into the standard TOUGH2 (Pruess et al., 1991) framework. This document provides a user's guide for the most recent version of the hysteretic code, which runs within iTOUGH2 (Finsterle, 1999a,b,c). The current code differs only slightly from what was presented in Doughty (2007), hence that document provides the basic information on the processes being modeled and how they are conceptualized. This document focuses on a description of the user-specified parameters required to run hysteretic iTOUGH2. In the few instances where the conceptualization differs from that of Doughty (2007), the features described here are the current ones. Sample problems presented in this user's guide use the equation-of-state module ECO2N (Pruess, 2005). The components present in ECO2N are H{sub 2}O, NaCl, and CO{sub 2}. Two fluid phases and one solid phase are considered: an aqueous phase, which primarily consists of liquid H2O and may contain dissolved NaCl and CO{sub 2}; a supercritical phase which primarily consists of CO{sub 2}, but also includes a small amount of gaseous H{sub 2}O; and a solid phase consisting of precipitated NaCl. Details of the ECO2N formulation may be found in Pruess (2005). The aqueous phase is the wetting phase and is denoted ''liquid'', whereas the supercritical phase is the non-wetting phase and is denoted ''gas''. The hysteretic formalism may be applied to other ...
Date: August 1, 2009
Creator: Doughty, C.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Influence of a Subslab Gravel Layer and Open Area on Soil-Gas and Radon Entry into Two Experimental Basements

Description: Measurements of steady-state soil-gas and {sup 222}Rn entry rates into two room-sized, experimental basement structures were made for a range of structure depressurizations (0-40 Pa) and open areas (0-165 x 10{sup -4} m{sup 2}). The structures are identical except that in one the floor slab lies directly on native soil whereas in the other the slab lies on a high permeability gravel layer. The subslab gravel layer greatly enhances the soil-gas and radon entry rate into the structure. The radon entry rate into the structure with the subslab gravel layer is four times greater than the entry rate into the structure without the gravel layer with an open area of 165 x 10{sup -4} m{sup 2}; the ratio increases to 30 for an open area of 5.0 x 10{sup -4} m{sup 2}. Although open area is a poor indicator of radon and soil-gas entry into the experimental structure, the extension of the soil-gas pressure field created by structure depressurization is a good measure of the radon entry rate into the experimental structures. The measured normalized radon entry rate into both structures has the same linear relationship with the average subslab pressure coupling regardless of open area. The average subslab pressure coupling is a measure of the extension of the soil-gas pressure field. A three-dimensional finite-difference model correctly predicts the effect of a subslab gravel layer, and different open area configurations on radon and soil-gas entry rate; however, the model underpredicts the absolute entry rates into both structures by a factor of 1.5.
Date: September 1, 1994
Creator: Robinson, Arthur L. & Sextro, R.G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Influence of a Subslab Gravel Layer and Open Area on Soil-Gas and Radon Entry into Two Experimental Basements

Description: Measurements of steady-state soil-gas and {sup 222}Rn entry rates into two room-sized, experimental basement structures were made for a range of structure depressurizations (0-40 Pa) and open floor areas (0-165 x 10{sup -4} m{sup 2}). The structures are identical except that in one the floor slab lies directly on native soil whereas in the other the slab lies on a high-permeability gravel layer. The subslab gravel layer greatly enhances the soil-gas and radon entry rate into the structure. The radon entry rate into the structure with the subslab gravel layer is four times greater than the entry rate into the structure without the gravel layer with an open floor area of 165 x 10{sup -4}m{sup 2}; however the ratio increases to 30 for an open floor area of 5.0 x 10{sup -4} m{sup 2}. The relationship between open area and soil-gas entry rate is complex. It depends on both the amount and distribution of the open area as well as the permeability of the soil near the opening. The entry rate into the experimental structures is largely determined by the presence or absence of a subslab gravel layer. Therefore open area is a poor indicator of radon and soil-gas entry into the structures. The extension of the soil-gas pressure field created by structure depressurization is a good measure of the radon entry. The measured normalized radon entry rate into both structures has the same linear relationship with the average subslab pressure coupling regardless of open area or the presence or absence of a subslab gravel layer. The average subslab pressure coupling is an estimate of the extension of the soil-gas pressure field. A three-dimensional finite-difference model correctly predicts the effect of a subslab gravel layer and different open area configurations on radon and soil-gas entry rate; however, the model underpredicts ...
Date: March 1, 1995
Creator: Robinson, Allen L. & Sextro, R.G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Seismic imaging of reservoir flow properties: Resolving waterinflux and reservoir permeability

Description: Methods for geophysical model assessment, in particuale thecomputation of model parameter resolution, indicate the value and thelimitations of time-lapse data in estimating reservoir flow properties. Atrajectory-based method for computing sensitivities provides an effectivemeans to compute model parameter resolutions. We examine the commonsituation in which water encroaches into a resrvoir from below, as due tothe upward movement of an oil-water contact. Using straight-forwardtechniques we find that, by inclusing reflections off the top and bottomof a reservoir tens of meters thick, we can infer reservoir permeabilitybased upon time-lapse data. We find that, for the caseof water influxfrom below, using multiple time-lapse 'snapshots' does not necessarilyimprove the resolution of reservoir permeability. An application totime-lapse data from the Norne field illustrates that we can resolve thepermeability near a producing well using reflections from threeinterfaces associated with the reservoir.
Date: November 27, 2006
Creator: Vasco, D.W. & Keers, Henk
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Seismic imaging of reservoir flow properties: Time-lapse pressurechanges

Description: Time-lapse fluid pressure and saturation estimates are sensitive to reservoir flow properties such as permeability. In fact, given time-lapse estimates of pressure and saturation changes, one may define a linear partial differential equation for permeability variations within the reservoir. The resulting linear inverse problem can be solved quite efficiently using sparse matrix techniques. An application to a set of crosswell saturation and pressure estimates from a CO{sub 2} flood at the Lost Hills field in California demonstrates the utility of this approach. From the crosswell estimates detailed estimates of reservoir permeability are produced. The resulting permeability estimates agree with a permeability log in an adjacent well and are in accordance with water and CO{sub 2} saturation changes in the interwell region.
Date: April 8, 2003
Creator: Vasco, Don W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Permeability Upscaling Measured on a Block of Berea Sandstone: Results and Interpretation

Description: To physically investigate permeability upscaling over 13,000 permeability values were measured with four different sample supports (i.e., sample volumes) on a block of Berea Sandstone. At each sample support spatially-exhaustive permeability data sets were measured, subject to consistent flow geometry and boundary conditions, with a specially adapted minipermeameter test system. Here, we present and analyze a subset of the data consisting of 2304 permeability values collected from a single block face oriented normal to stratification. Results reveal a number of distinct and consistent trends (i.e., upscaling) relating changes in key summary statistics to an increasing sample support. Examples include the sample mean and semivariogram range that increase with increasing sample support and the sample variance that decreases. To help interpret the measured mean upscaling we compared it to theoretical models that are only available for somewhat different flow geometries. The comparison suggests that the non-uniform flow imposed by the rninipermeameter coupled with permeability anisotropy at the scale of the local support (i.e., smallest sample support for which data is available) are the primary controls on the measured upscaling. This work demonstrates, experimentally, that it is not always appropriate to treat the local-support permeability as an intrinsic feature of the porous medium; that is, independent of its conditions of measurement.
Date: May 6, 1999
Creator: Tidwell, Vincent C. & Wilson, John L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Effects of High Altitude Exposure on Capillary Permeability

Description: Observations of decreases in plasma volume, shifts in plasma and lymph protein concentrations, and increases in capillary permeability at high altitude have been reported in the literature by several investigators. This investigation was begun in an attempt to elucidate the possible significance of these phenomena in future space exploration, and because of the lack of knowledge concerning the underlying mechanisms. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effects of exposure to hypobaric pressures on the capillary permeability to the normal plasma and lymph proteins.
Date: December 1971
Creator: Reaves, Troy Albert
Partner: UNT Libraries

Tritium Processing and Containment Technology for Fusion Reactors, Annual Report: July 1975-June 1976

Description: The hydrogen permeabilities of selected metals, alloys, and multiplex preparations that are of interest to fusion reactor technology are being characterized. A high-vacuum hydrogen-permeation apparatus has been constructed for this purpose. A program of studies has been initiated to develop design details for the tritium-handling systems of near-term fusion reactors. This program has resulted in a better definition of reactor-fuel-cycle and enrichment requirements and has helped to identify major research and development problems in the tritium-handling area. The design and construction of a 50-gallon lithium-processing test loop (LPTL) is well under way. Studies in support of this project are providing important guidance in the selection of hardware for the LPTL and in the design of a molten-salt processing test section.
Date: 1976?
Creator: Maroni, V. A.; Calaway, W. F.; Misra, B.; Van Deventer, E. H.; Wegton, J. R.; Yonco, R. M. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Frequency-dependent viscous flow in channels with fractal rough surfaces

Description: The viscous dynamic permeability of some fractal-like channels is studied. For our particular class of geometries, the ratio of the pore surface area-to-volume tends to {infinity} (but has a finite cutoff), and the universal scaling of the dynamic permeability, k({omega}), needs modification. We performed accurate numerical computations of k({omega}) for channels characterized by deterministic fractal wall surfaces, for a broad range of fractal dimensions. The pertinent scaling model for k({omega}) introduces explicitly the fractal dimension of the wall surface for a range of frequencies across the transition between viscous and inertia dominated regimes. The new model provides excellent agreement with our numerical simulations.
Date: May 1, 2010
Creator: Cortis, A. & Berryman, J.G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

System level permeability modeling of porous hydrogen storage materials.

Description: A permeability model for hydrogen transport in a porous material is successfully applied to both laboratory-scale and vehicle-scale sodium alanate hydrogen storage systems. The use of a Knudsen number dependent relationship for permeability of the material in conjunction with a constant area fraction channeling model is shown to accurately predict hydrogen flow through the reactors. Generally applicable model parameters were obtained by numerically fitting experimental measurements from reactors of different sizes and aspect ratios. The degree of channeling was experimentally determined from the measurements and found to be 2.08% of total cross-sectional area. Use of this constant area channeling model and the Knudsen dependent Young & Todd permeability model allows for accurate prediction of the hydrogen uptake performance of full-scale sodium alanate and similar metal hydride systems.
Date: January 1, 2010
Creator: Kanouff, Michael P.; Dedrick, Daniel E. & Voskuilen, Tyler (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Permeability of the Kidney Capillaries to Narrow-Range Macromolecular Dextran Fractions

Description: Recent investigations into the permeability of the kidney capillaries have produced conflicting reports. This study was an attempt to better describe the permeability of the kidney capillaries by using narrow-range macromolecular dextran fractions in four molecular sizes: MW 61,400, MW 77,000, MW 118,000, and MW 147,000. Permeability was measured by dextran concentration differences in plasma and kidney lymph. Permeability decreased as the dextran molecular weight increased. Molecular weights 61,400 and 77,000 penetrated into the kidney lymph. Molecular weight 118,000 exhibited greater difficulty in penetrating to the lymph. The largest fraction penetrated into the kidney lymph with greatest difficulty. Plasma expansion by saline infusion increased the permeability of all dextran fractions.
Date: August 1979
Creator: Wooldridge, Clayton Bradley
Partner: UNT Libraries

Geothermal Permeability Enhancement - Final Report

Description: The overall objective is to apply known permeability enhancement techniques to reduce the number of wells needed and demonstrate the applicability of the techniques to other undeveloped or under-developed fields. The Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) concept presented in this project enhances energy extraction from reduced permeability zones in the super-heated, vapor-dominated Aidlin Field of the The Geysers geothermal reservoir. Numerous geothermal reservoirs worldwide, over a wide temperature range, contain zones of low permeability which limit the development potential and the efficient recovery of heat from these reservoirs. Low permeability results from poorly connected fractures or the lack of fractures. The Enhanced Geothermal System concept presented here expands these technologies by applying and evaluating them in a systematic, integrated program.
Date: June 30, 2009
Creator: Beall, Joe & Walters, Mark
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Laboratory evaluation of damage criteria and permeability of Big Hill salt.

Description: To establish strength criteria of Big Hill salt, a series of quasi-static triaxial compression tests have been completed. This report summarizes the test methods, set-up, relevant observations, and results. The triaxial compression tests established dilatant damage criteria for Big Hill salt in terms of stress invariants (I{sub 1} and J{sub 2}) and principal stresses ({sigma}{sub a,d} and {sigma}{sub 3}), respectively: {radical}J{sub 2}(psi) = 1746-1320.5 exp{sup -0.00034I{sub 1}(psi)}; {sigma}{sub a,d}(psi) = 2248 + 1.25 {sigma}{sub 3} (psi). For the confining pressure of 1,000 psi, the dilatant damage strength of Big Hill salt is identical to the typical salt strength ({radical}J{sub 2} = 0.27 I{sub 1}). However, for higher confining pressure, the typical strength criterion overestimates the damage strength of Big Hill salt.
Date: November 1, 2004
Creator: Ehgartner, Brian L.; Park, Byoung Yoon; Lee, Moo Yul & Bronowski, David R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Observations on Faults and Associated Permeability Structures in Hydrogeologic Units at the Nevada Test Site

Description: Observational data on Nevada Test Site (NTS) faults were gathered from a variety of sources, including surface and tunnel exposures, core samples, geophysical logs, and down-hole cameras. These data show that NTS fault characteristics and fault zone permeability structures are similar to those of faults studied in other regions. Faults at the NTS form complex and heterogeneous fault zones with flow properties that vary in both space and time. Flow property variability within fault zones can be broken down into four major components that allow for the development of a simplified, first approximation model of NTS fault zones. This conceptual model can be used as a general guide during development and evaluation of groundwater flow and contaminate transport models at the NTS.
Date: March 30, 2009
Creator: Prothro, Lance B.; Drellack, Sigmund L.; Haugstad, Dawn N.; Huckins-Gang, Heather E. & Townsend, Margaret J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department