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Raising Sheep on Temporary Pastures

Description: "A system of temporary pastures for sheep raising permits the use of lands of low fertility and at the same time insures a revenue from them without an expensive outlay for commercial fertilizer. Only lime, phosphorus, and inoculating materials are necessary to enable poor soils to produce legumes. This bulletin explains the advantages and methods of using temporary pastures for sheep and gives results of experiments conducted at the Bureau of Animal Industry experiment farm, Beltsville, Md." -- p. 2
Date: 1921
Creator: Marshall, F. R. & Potts, C. G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Cattle Ranges of the Southwest: A History of the Exhaustion of the Pasturage and Suggestions for Its Restoration

Description: Report giving "a history of the exhaustion of the pasturage of central Texas, with suggestions for its restoration. The general features of the country are described; the early conditions of the ranges and the causes which have led to their deterioration are graphically portrayed. The obstacles in the way of the improvement of the ranges and how the value of the stock ranges may be renewed are topics discussed in detail. The report closes with brief descriptions of a few other of the most important native grasses and forage plants which may be utilized in improving the pasturage or increasing the production of forage." -- p. 2.
Date: 1898
Creator: Bentley, H. L. (Henry Lewis)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Alfalfa Growing

Description: Report discussing the cultivation of alfalfa and its potential as a crop for hay and pastures. Also includes a discussion of the various weeds, pests, and fungi which affect alfalfa.
Date: 1905
Creator: Hitchcock, A. S. (Albert Spear), 1865-1935
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Hog Pastures for the Southern States

Description: This bulletin describes how farmers in the southern United States can cultivate pastures for hogs using forage crops. Among the crops recommended are corn, sorghum, winter grains, alfalfa, several varieties of clover and beans, cowpeas, peanuts, chufas, sweet potatoes, mangels, and rape.
Date: 1918
Creator: Carrier, Lyman & Ashbrook, F. G. (Frank Getz), 1892-
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Carpet Grass

Description: Report discussing carpet grass, which is an unappreciated but highly valuable grass that grows in permanent pastures on sandy soils, especially in the Coastal Plain of the southern United States. Discussion focuses on growing conditions and pasture practices.
Date: 1920
Creator: Piper, Charles V. (Charles Vancouver), 1867-1926
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

[Horse and Foal Side by Side]

Description: Photograph of a horse and foal in a pasture. The horse is held by a lead and facing the left of the frame, the foal stands in front of the horse facing the same direction. There is pipe fencing installed behind them. Metal barns and buildings stand in the distance. The foal's tail is caught in the air mid-wag. File cites Will Daly, who may be the owner.
Date: unknown
Creator: Don Shugart Photography
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Horse and Foal Side by Side]

Description: Photograph of a horse and foal in a pasture. The horse is held by a lead and facing the left of the frame, the foal stands in front of the horse facing the same direction. There is pipe fencing installed behind them. Metal barns and buildings stand in the distance. File cites Will Daly, who may be the owner.
Date: unknown
Creator: Don Shugart Photography
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

Forage Plants for the South

Description: Report discussing the findings of an experimental study of over 500 native and foreign species of grasses and other forage plants in the southern United States. The report is limited to a discussion of species that were established to hold agricultural value for hay and pastures.
Date: 1894
Creator: Smith, Erwin F. (Erwin Frink), 1854-1927
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

[Horse and Foal side by side (2)]

Description: Photograph of a horse and foal in a pasture. The horse is held by a lead and facing the left of the frame, the foal stands in front of the horse facing the same direction. There is pipe fencing installed behind them. Metal barns and buildings stand in the distance. File cites Will Daly, who may be the owner.
Date: unknown
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Horse and Foal]

Description: Photograph of a horse and foal in a pasture. The horse is held by a lead and facing the left of the frame, the foal stands in front of the horse facing the opposite directions. There is pipe fencing installed behind them. Metal barns and buildings stand in the distance.
Date: unknown
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

Good pastures.

Description: A guide to improving pastures for the purpose of increasing production during wartime.
Date: May 1943
Creator: Semple, Arthur T. (Arthur Truman), 1895- & Hein, M. A. (Mason August), b. 1894.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Irrigated pastures for forage production and soil conservation.

Description: Discusses the importance of increasing farm productivity to meet needs created by World War II. Provides suggestions for the establishment and management of pastures, including irrigation, fertilization, and the use of grasses and legumes.
Date: September 1945
Creator: Hamilton, J. G. (James Guy), b. 1891.; Brown, Grover F., 1905-; Tower, Harold E. (Harold Everett), 1904- & Collins, Wilkie, Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Seasonal and inter-annual variability in 13C composition of ecosystem carbon fluxes in the U.S. Southern Great Plains

Description: The {delta}{sup 13}C signature of terrestrial carbon fluxes ({delta}{sub bio}) provides an important constraint for inverse models of CO{sub 2} sources and sinks, insight into vegetation physiology, C{sub 3} and C{sub 4} vegetation productivity, and ecosystem carbon residence times. From 2002-2009, we measured atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration and {delta}{sup 13}C-CO{sub 2} at four heights (2 to 60 m) in the U.S. Southern Great Plains (SGP) and computed {delta}{sub bio} weekly. This region has a fine-scale mix of crops (primarily C{sub 3} winter wheat) and C{sub 4} pasture grasses. {delta}{sub bio} had a large and consistent seasonal cycle of 6-8{per_thousand}. Ensemble monthly mean {delta}{sub bio} ranged from -25.8 {+-} 0.4{per_thousand} ({+-}SE) in March to -20.1 {+-} 0.4{per_thousand} in July. Thus, C{sub 3} vegetation contributed about 80% of ecosystem fluxes in winter-spring and 50% in summer-fall. In contrast, prairie-soil {delta}{sub 13}C values were about -15{per_thousand}, indicating that historically the region was dominated by C{sub 4} vegetation and had more positive {delta}{sub bio} values. Based on a land-surface model, isofluxes ({delta}{sub bio} x NEE) in this region have large seasonal amplitude because {delta}{sub bio} and net ecosystem exchange (NEE) covary. Interannual variability in isoflux was driven by variability in NEE. The large seasonal amplitude in {delta}{sub bio} and isoflux imply that carbon inverse analyses require accurate estimates of land cover and temporally resolved {sup 13}CO{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} fluxes.
Date: September 22, 2010
Creator: Torn, M. S.; Biraud, S.; Still, C. J.; Riley, W. J. & Berry, J. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Shillapoo Wildlife Area, Annual Report 2007-2008.

Description: This report summarizes accomplishments, challenges and successes on WDFW's Shillapoo Wildlife Area funded under Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Wildlife Mitigation Program (BPA project No.2003-012-00) during the Fiscal Year 08 contract period October 1, 2007-September 30, 2008. The information presented here is intended to supplement that contained in BPA's PISCES contract development and reporting system. The organization below is by broad categories of work but references are made to individual work elements in the PISCES Statement of Work as appropriate. Significant progress was realized in almost all major work types. Of particular note was progress made in tree plantings and pasture rehabilitation efforts. This year's tree planting effort included five sites detailed below and in terms of the number of plants was certainly the largest effort on the wildlife area to date in one season. The planting itself took a significant amount of time, which was anticipated. However, installation of mats and tubes took much longer than expected which impacted planned fence projects in particular. Survival of the plantings appears to be good. Improvement to the quality of waterfowl pasture habitats is evident on a number of sites due to replanting and weed control efforts. Continuing long-term weed control efforts will be key in improving this particular type of habitat. A prolonged cold, wet spring and a number of equipment breakdowns presented stumbling blocks that impacted schedules and ultimately progress on planned activities. The unusual spring weather delayed fieldwork on pasture planting projects as well as weed control and slowed the process of maintaining trees and shrubs. This time lag also caused the continued deferral of some of our fencing projects. The large brush hog mower had the driveline break twice and the smaller tractor had an engine failure that caused it to be down for over a month. We have ...
Date: October 1, 2007
Creator: Calkins, Brian
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Growth in Biofuels Markets: Long Term Environmental and Socioeconomic Impacts (Final Report)

Description: Over the last several years increasing energy and petroleum prices have propelled biofuels and the feedstocks used to produce them, to the forefront of alternative energy production. This growth has increased the linkages between energy and agricultural markets and these changes around the world are having a significant effect on agricultural markets as biofuels begin to play a more substantial role in meeting the world's energy needs. Biofuels are alternatively seen as a means to reduce carbon emissions, increase energy independence, support rural development and to raise farm income. However, concern has arisen that the new demand for traditional commodities or alternative commodities which compete for land can lead to higher food prices and the environmental effects from expanding crop acreage may result in uncertain changes in carbon emissions as land is converted both in the US and abroad. While a number of studies examine changes in land use and consumption from changes in biofuels policies many lack effective policy representation or complete coverage of land types which may be diverted in to energy feedstock production. Many of these biofuels and renewable energy induced land use changes are likely to occur in developing countries with at-risk consumers and on environmentally sensitive lands. Our research has improved the well known FAPRI-MU modeling system which represents US agricultural markets and policies in great detail and added a new model of land use and commodity markets for major commodity producers, consumers and trade dependent and food insecure countries as well as a rest of the world aggregate. The international modules include traditional annual crop lands and include perennial crop land, pasture land, forest land and other land uses from which land may be drawn in to biofuels or renewable energy feedstock production. Changes in calorie consumption in food insecure countries from changes in ...
Date: December 2, 2010
Creator: Meyer, Seth D. & Kalaitzandonakes, Nicholas
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

[News Clip: Grass fire]

Description: B-roll video footage from the KXAS-TV/NBC station in Fort Worth, Texas, covering a news story about a grass fire. This news story shows footage of firefighters working on putting the fire out. Tis story aired at 6pm.
Date: January 11, 1990, 6:00 p.m.
Creator: KXAS-TV (Television station : Fort Worth, Tex.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections