63 Matching Results

Search Results

Advanced search parameters have been applied.

2003 Pantex Plant Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report, Revised September 2007

Description: Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Program report for 2003 for the Pantex Plant. DOE is commited to assuring the health and safety of its workers. This includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The IISP monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.
Date: October 5, 2007
Creator: U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Coupling measurement and lightning threat assessment report for Pantex Cell 12-44-1

Description: This report is the first of a series that will quantify the lightning threat to the Pantex Plant where high-risk operations occur. More information can be found in the report written by the Lightning Protection Team [1] and Sandia National Laboratory documents. Low-power RF coupling measurements were completed on Cell 12-44-1 in May 1998. These measurements quantify the voltage and current levels that could leak into the cell from possible lightning strike points. Cell 1 is representative of the most �leaky� class of cells at Pantex because the floor was not intentionally electrically connected to the walls. From the measurement data, linear models were developed. These transfer functions allow us to calculate the effect in the cell from the much higher power lightning threat. Two types of coupling paths were characterized: (1) external ventilation stack to cell interior and (2) cell ceiling to other cell elements. For the maximum lightning threat [2], an estimate of the maximum cell-to-floor voltage is 150 kV. The extrapolated voltage levels at normal working heights are lower. The potential between the air duct and the electro-static ground is estimated to be 4 kV. A secondary goal was to compare results with Sandia as a quality control check. While the estimated maximum ceiling-to-floor voltages are similar, the comparison was limited by high-frequency resonances on the drive wire.
Date: September 1, 1998
Creator: Anderson, R & Ong, M
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Study: Earth shock comparisons, Pantex Plant

Description: This report contains comparisons of various earth shocks experienced at the Pantex Water Well No. 16. Included are comparisons for the Alaskan quake of March 28, 1984; Amarillo shock of July 20, 1966; ten pounds of high explosives; fifty pounds of high explosives; two hundred pounds of high explosives; one man stomping feet; and tractor driving near well.
Date: September 16, 1966
Creator: Cummings, J.E. & Sackett, G.W. Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Thermal properties and chemical reactivity. [Quarterly report], October--December 1969

Description: (Explosives are studied.) Impurities in FEFO and relatively pure FEFO fractions are being obtained by preparative gas chromatography. Use of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to identify the impurities in FEFO was not successful. Gas chromatography analysis of gas samples taken from the coupon test are reported. Analysis from the third compression type coupon test is reported. The LX-09 lost some of its mechanical strength and was a dark purple. Some of the problems of measuring sample temperature in the high pressure DTA are discussed. DTA thermograms at ambient and elevated pressures are reported for FEFO, nitromethane, Na{sub 3}PO{sub 4}{center_dot}10 H{sub 2}O, and NH{sub 4}H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}.
Date: December 31, 1969
Creator: Myers, L.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Advanced Production Planning Models

Description: >This report describes the innovative modeling approach developed as a result of a 3-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development project. The overall goal of this project was to provide an effective suite of solvers for advanced production planning at facilities in the nuclear weapons complex (NWC). We focused our development activities on problems related to operations at the DOE's Pantex Plant. These types of scheduling problems appear in many contexts other than Pantex--both within the NWC (e.g., Neutron Generators) and in other commercial manufacturing settings. We successfully developed an innovative and effective solution strategy for these types of problems. We have tested this approach on actual data from Pantex, and from Org. 14000 (Neutron Generator production). This report focuses on the mathematical representation of the modeling approach and presents three representative studies using Pantex data. Results associated with the Neutron Generator facility will be published in a subsequent SAND report. The approach to task-based scheduling described here represents a significant addition to the literature for large-scale, realistic scheduling problems in a variety of production settings.
Date: December 1, 2000
Creator: JONES,DEAN A.; LAWTON,CRAIG R.; KJELDGAARD,EDWIN A.; WRIGHT,STEPHEN TROY; TURNQUIST,MARK A.; NOZICK,LINDA K. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Solid phase microextraction analysis of B83 SLTS and Core B compatibility test units

Description: Solid phase microextraction has permitted the efficient collection and analysis of a broad range of volatile and semivolatile compounds outgassed from materials. In 1998, we implemented a microextraction protocol at Mason and Hanger, Pantex Plant, for the analysis of weapons and compatibility test units. The chemical information that was obtained from this work is interpreted by determining the source and outgas mechanism for each compound in the weapon signature, which is a task only accomplished by analysis of material standards.
Date: March 26, 1999
Creator: Chambers, D M; Ithaca, J; King, H A & Malcolm, S
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Audit of construction of an environmental, safety, and health analytical laboratory at the Pantex Plant

Description: This document is a report from the Office of the Inspector General, US DOE. The report evaluates the need for the construction of an Environmental, Safety, and Health Laboratory at the Pantex Plant and if this project is the most cost effective manner in which to meet mission needs. It was found that: (1) mission needs were being met with existing facilities, (2) required evaluations of alternatives were not performed, (3) decisions were made based on out-dated justifications, and (4) the expenditure of $8.4M was unnecessary. As a result, it was recommended that funded be suspended until the need is clearly established.
Date: October 1, 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fast track demonstration of the straight-line system architecture

Description: Sandia National Laboratories is developing Fast Track as a near term demonstration of the Straight-Line nuclear material monitoring system architecture. It will implement major elements of the Straight-Line system in a realistic system setting. Fast Track will act as a test bed to gain information on monitoring stored, weapon grade nuclear material. The Pantex plant near Amarillo, Texas has agreed to participate as a demonstration site along with sites located in New Mexico and California. Information from sensors, deployed on AL-R8 nuclear material containers and throughout the storage magazine will be collected from each site, processed and disseminated to local and remote users. Initial operation of this system was slated for June 1, 1995. This paper will address the system architecture and engineering aspects of fielding this system on a compressed time schedule. Collection of data in a nuclear environment, transmission, processing and lessons learned from deployment will also be discussed.
Date: August 1, 1995
Creator: Mickelsen, B.; Cofield, C.; Damico, J.; Oetken, B. & Hanson, E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

USING AN ADAPTER TO PERFORM THE CHALFANT-STYLE CONTAINMENT VESSEL PERIODIC MAINTENANCE LEAK RATE TEST

Description: Recently the Packaging Technology and Pressurized Systems (PT&PS) organization at the Savannah River National Laboratory was asked to develop an adapter for performing the leak-rate test of a Chalfant-style containment vessel. The PT&PS organization collaborated with designers at the Department of Energy's Pantex Plant to develop the adapter currently in use for performing the leak-rate testing on the containment vessels. This paper will give the history of leak-rate testing of the Chalfant-style containment vessels, discuss the design concept for the adapter, give an overview of the design, and will present results of the testing done using the adapter.
Date: June 3, 2011
Creator: Loftin, B.; Abramczyk, G. & Trapp, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

2006 Pantex Plant Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

Description: The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.
Date: May 19, 2008
Creator: United States. Department of Energy. Office of Health, Safety, and Security.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

2007 Pantex Plant Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

Description: The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.
Date: July 31, 2008
Creator: United States. Department of Energy. Office of Health, Safety, and Security.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Current limiters

Description: The current that flows between the electrical test equipment and the nuclear explosive must be limited to safe levels during electrical tests conducted on nuclear explosives at the DOE Pantex facility. The safest way to limit the current is to use batteries that can provide only acceptably low current into a short circuit; unfortunately this is not always possible. When it is not possible, current limiters, along with other design features, are used to limit the current. Three types of current limiters, the fuse blower, the resistor limiter, and the MOSFET-pass-transistor limiters, are used extensively in Pantex test equipment. Detailed failure mode and effects analyses were conducted on these limiters. Two other types of limiters were also analyzed. It was found that there is no best type of limiter that should be used in all applications. The fuse blower has advantages when many circuits must be monitored, a low insertion voltage drop is important, and size and weight must be kept low. However, this limiter has many failure modes that can lead to the loss of over current protection. The resistor limiter is simple and inexpensive, but is normally usable only on circuits for which the nominal current is less than a few tens of milliamperes. The MOSFET limiter can be used on high current circuits, but it has a number of single point failure modes that can lead to a loss of protective action. Because bad component placement or poor wire routing can defeat any limiter, placement and routing must be designed carefully and documented thoroughly.
Date: September 1, 1996
Creator: Loescher, D.H. & Noren, K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Thermal analysis of simulated Pantex pit storage

Description: This report investigates potential pit storage configurations that could be used at the Mason and Hanger Pantex Plant. The study utilizes data from a thermal test series performed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) that simulated these storage configurations. The heat output values used in the LLNL test series do not represent actual pits but are rounded numbers that were chosen for convenience to allow parameter excursions. Specifically in this project, we are modeling the heat transfer and air flow around cylindrical storage containers in Pantex magazines in order to predict container temperatures. This difficult problem in thermal- fluid mechanics involves transient, three-dimensional (3-D) natural convection and thermal radiation around interacting containers with various heat generation rates. Our approach is to link together two computational methods in order to synthesize a modeling procedure for a large array of pit storage containers. The approach employs a finite element analysis of a few containers, followed by a lumped- parameter model of an array of containers. The modeling procedure we developed was applied in the simulation of a recent experiment where temperatures of pit storage containers were monitored in a steady- state, controlled environment. Our calculated pit container temperatures are comparable with data from that experiment. We found it absolutely necessary to include thermal radiation between containers in order to predict temperatures accurately, although the assumption of black-body radiation appears to be sufficient. When radiation is neglected the calculated temperatures are 4 to 6 {degrees}C higher than temperature data from the experiment. We also investigated our model`s sensitivity to variations in the natural convection heat transfer coefficient and found that with a 50% drop in the coefficient, calculated temperatures are approximately I {degree}C higher. Finally, with a modified lumped-parameter model, we demonstrate how an entire Pantex magazine can be simulated.
Date: October 1, 1996
Creator: Aceves, S.M., Kornblum, B.T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Estimates of deep drainage rates at the U.S. Department of Energy Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas

Description: In FY 1996, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) provided technical assistance to Battelle Columbus Operations (BCO) in their ongoing assessment of contaminant migration at the Pantex Plant in Amarillo, Texas. The objective of this report is to calculate deep drainage rates at the Pantex Plant. These deep drainage rates may eventually be used to predict contaminant loading to the underlying unconfined aquifer for the Pantex Plant Baseline Risk Assessment. These rates will also be used to support analyses of remedial activities involving surface alterations or the subsurface injection withdrawal of liquids or gases. The scope of this report is to estimate deep drainage rates for the major surface features at the Pantex Plant, including ditches and playas, natural grassland, dryland crop rotation, unvegetated soil, and graveled surfaces. Areas such as Pantex Lake that are outside the main plant boundaries were not included in the analysis. All estimates were derived using existing data or best estimates; no new data were collected. The modeling framework used to estimate the rates is described to enable future correlations, improvements, and enhancements. The scope of this report includes only data gathered during FY 1996. However, a current review of the data gathered on weather, soil, plants, and other information in the time period since did not reveal anything that would significantly alter the results presented in this report.
Date: April 1, 1998
Creator: Fayer, M.J.; Richmond, M.C.; Wigmosta, M.S. & Kelley, M.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Lessons Learned from JTA Tester Safety Studies

Description: EP401575, Issue C, calls out a requirement to perform safety studies for testers that are used to accept Joint Test Assembly (JTA) product at Pantex (Reference 1). The underlying motivation is to ensure that personnel hazards due to inadvertent initiation of electro-explosive devices (EEDs) during JTA testing are understood and minimized. Studies have been performed on the B61-7/11 JTA, B61-3/4/10 JTA, B83 JTA, and W76 Type 2F testers at Pantex (References 2-5). Each of these studies includes an examination of the relevant Pantex tester as well as the instrumentation and War Reserve (WR) hardware. In performing these analyses, several themes have emerged that could be useful for the Phase 6.3 design efforts for the weapons, the associated instrumentation, and the JTA testers. This report summarizes the lessons learned from these studies. Note that in some cases, the recommendations provided below to enhance safety during JTA testing operations (e.g., adding isolation resistors in the monitoring lines) may result in a reliability degradation or other surety impact. Thus it is important to consider these lessons learned in the context of the overall design and to make tradeoffs in light of the integrated surety objectives. The lessons learned are listed in five different categories, summarized as: (1) Instrumentation considerations; (2) WR design considerations; (3) Tester considerations; (4) Administrative procedures during JTA assembly; and (5) Administrative procedures prior to and during JTA testing. The first three focus on minimizing the probability of inadvertent application of power to EED initiation lines due to component, connector, and assembly failures. The last two describe procedural steps that can be taken at Pantex to either minimize the risk (e.g., by ensuring that tester power supplies cannot supply excessive power to the unit under test) or to mitigate the consequences of unexpected EED initiation (e.g., by instructing test operators ...
Date: May 1, 2001
Creator: Bierbaum, R. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Safety handling characteristics of LX-04-1

Description: LX-04-1 is DOE`s safest ``creep resistant`` conventional high explosive (CHE) with excellent thermal and long term compatibility properties. Because LX-04-1 contains 15% Viton by weight, it exhibits outstanding resistance to mechanical stimuli such as could be encountered in an accident scenario at the Pantex Plant. A large energy fluence is required to initiate LX-04-1. The most likely methods to generate this energy into the individual cracked W70 HE is via dropping the unit onto the floor (or tooling) or the cracked HE rubbing against itself. In either case, not enough energy is available to cause the LX-04-1 to even mildly react as evidenced by the supporting data that follows. Experimenters have developed a number of sensitivity tests, each seeking to initiate reaction in a rigidly prescribed manner so that results from different investigators may be compared. Although it is possible for an explosive to exhibit high sensitivity on some tests and low sensitivity on others, LX-04-1 consistently shows low sensitivity to detonation on all tests. Table 1 compares the general stability and energy properties of LX-04-1 with PBX-9404 and LX-10-2.
Date: May 1, 1996
Creator: Humphrey, J.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Kinetics of chromium(VI) reduction by ferrous iron

Description: Chromium is a primary inorganic contaminant of concern at the Pantex Plant. Chromium concentrations have been found to be two orders of magnitude higher than the drinking water standards, particularly in certain wells in the perched aquifer below Zone 12. In situ reduction of a mobile form of chromium, Cr(VI) to an immobile form, Cr(III), was examined as a viable option to active soil restoration. Successfully immobilizing chromium in the vadose zone as Cr(III) will reduce the amount of chromium that reaches the groundwater table. The results from the solution experiments indicated that chromium was rapidly and stoichiometrically reduced by Fe(II) in solution. Also, the slurry experiments showed that the aquifer solids removed Fe(II) from solution, but a portion of the iron removed remained available for reaction with Cr(VI), but at a slower rate. A model to predict different amounts of iron pseudo-components was developed, which allowed prediction of iron amounts required to reduce chromium under in situ conditions.
Date: September 1, 1998
Creator: Batchelor, B.; Schlautman, M.; Hwang, I. & Wang, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

2009 Pantex Plant Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance

Description: The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.
Date: December 15, 2010
Creator: U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Feasibility of In Situ Redox Manipulation of Subsurface Sediments for RDX Remediation at Pantex

Description: This laboratory study was conducted to assess RDX (hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5 triazine) abiotic degradation by chemically reduced sediments and other geochemical aspects of the application of this technology to remediation of RDX contamination in groundwater at the U.S. DOE Pantex facility...
Date: December 31, 2001
Creator: Szecsody, James E.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Mckinley, Mark A.; Resch, Charles T. & Gilmore, Tyler J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A sensor-based automation system for handling nuclear materials

Description: An automated system is being developed for handling large payloads of radioactive nuclear materials in an analytical laboratory. The automation system performs unpacking and repacking of payloads from shipping and storage containers, and delivery of the payloads to the stations in the laboratory. The system uses machine vision and force/torque sensing to provide sensor-based control of the automation system in order to enhance system safety, flexibility, and robustness, and achieve easy remote operation. The automation system also controls the operation of the laboratory measurement systems and the coordination of them with the robotic system. Particular attention has been given to system design features and analytical methods that provide an enhanced level of operational safety. Independent mechanical gripper interlock and tool release mechanisms were designed to prevent payload mishandling. An extensive Failure Modes and Effects Analysis of the automation system was developed as a safety design analysis tool.
Date: March 1, 1997
Creator: Drotning, W.; Kimberly, H.; Wapman, W. & Darras, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Production planning tools and techniques for agile manufacturing

Description: Effective use of resources shared among multiple products or processes is critical for agile manufacturing. This paper describes development and implementation of a computerized model to support production planning in a complex manufacturing system at Pantex Plant. The model integrates two different production processes (nuclear weapon dismantlement and stockpile evaluation) which use common facilities and personnel, and reflects the interactions of scheduling constraints, material flow constraints, and resource availability. These two processes reflect characteristics of flow-shop and job-shop operations in a single facility. Operational results from using the model are also discussed.
Date: October 1, 1996
Creator: Kjeldgaard, E.A.; Jones, D.A.; List, G.F. & Turnquist, M.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Chemical and biological systems for treating waste streams contaminated with high explosives

Description: The removal of high explosives (HIE) from ordnance is being accomplished via washout steamout procedures. Because large volumes of waste water are generated by these processes, safe and efficient methods must be developed for their treatment. Activated carbon can be used to efficiently remove HE from aqueous waste streams, but carbon that is laden with HE constitutes a hazardous solid waste. Although conventional treatment methods (i.e., incineration, open burning) are available, they may not be in compliance with existing or future environmental regulations. New and cost-effective methods are therefore required for the elimination of this solid waste. We are developing and demonstrating coupled chemical and biological systems for the safe and economical treatment of HE-laden activated carbon. We have developed a completely engineered treatment system to accomplish this objective and have been operating a pilot treatment system at the Pantex Plant in Amarillo, TX. In this system, HE- contaminated waste water is treated first by activated-carbon adsorption columns. The HE sorbed to carbon is subsequently recovered via heated solvent elution or by base hydrolysis. The HE- or hydrolysate-laden fluid is then treated using a denitrifying culture of microorganisms, which converts the HE or hydrolysate byproducts to less hazardous endproducts. With these methods, the treated carbon can either be re-used or disposed as a nonhazardous waste. This strategy, which has been shown to be effective for the regeneration of carbon and the degradation of RDX and HMX, will be applicable to other energetic chemicals sorbed to activated carbon.
Date: November 1, 1995
Creator: Knezovich, J.P.; Daniels, J.L.; Stenstrom, M.K. & Heilmann, H.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

PO*WW*ER mobile treatment unit process hazards analysis

Description: The objective of this report is to demonstrate that a thorough assessment of the risks associated with the operation of the Rust Geotech patented PO*WW*ER mobile treatment unit (MTU) has been performed and documented. The MTU was developed to treat aqueous mixed wastes at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Albuquerque Operations Office sites. The MTU uses evaporation to separate organics and water from radionuclides and solids, and catalytic oxidation to convert the hazardous into byproducts. This process hazards analysis evaluated a number of accident scenarios not directly related to the operation of the MTU, such as natural phenomena damage and mishandling of chemical containers. Worst case accident scenarios were further evaluated to determine the risk potential to the MTU and to workers, the public, and the environment. The overall risk to any group from operation of the MTU was determined to be very low; the MTU is classified as a Radiological Facility with low hazards.
Date: June 1, 1996
Creator: Richardson, R. B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department