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Magnetostratigraphy of the Grande Ronde Basalt Pasco Basin, Washington

Description: The paleomagnetic measurements of samples from the holes sampled have shown that there are four magnetic correlation lines, between adjacent flows in holes that have distinctly different mean stratigraphic inclinations, and two magnetic polarity boundaries that can be used for magnetic correlation in the Grande Ronde Basalt in the Pasco Basin. The results of paleomagnetic measurements of samples from the Wanapum Basalt and Saddle Mountains Basalt indicate that the potential for magnetostratigraphic correlation in these sequences is also good.
Date: January 1, 1979
Creator: Packer, D.R. & Petty, M.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Solar radiation flux and insolation data for southern Idaho

Description: Weather data pertinent to the development of solar energy heating in the Northern Intermountain region were desired for the purpose of assessing the usefulness and potential economics of utilizing solar energy in the region. The data reported herein are for several southern Idaho stations and for Salt Lake City, and are considered to be representative of the area from the eastern slopes of the Cascades to the western slopes of the northern Rockies. While existing data are not highly accurate and are derived from widely separated stations, approximate estimates may be made for the solar flux in the area. Methods for acquiring more detailed data in specific locations are described in this report. (auth)
Date: November 1, 1975
Creator: Buchenauer, C.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Wind resource assessment status

Description: The first objective of the WCPE's regional assessment was to develop and test prototype techniques for the analysis of wind-energy potential and distribution over a large area. These techniques involved the utilization of a much larger data set, the application of meteorological and topographic factors in the analysis, and the use of indirect methods of wind power estimation in areas where no wind measurements existed. Five states in the Pacific Northwest were selected as a test of these techniques.
Date: January 1, 1979
Creator: Wendell, L.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Distribution of Balsamorhiza rosea in Rattlesnake Hills with respect to various environmental factors

Description: Balsamorhiza rosea (Compositae), a suffrutescent perennial, is found on several rocky hilltops with sparse canopy cover in Eastern Washington. This study investigated B. rosea's abundance and its associated species along several physical gradients. Important elements of microclimate selected for this analysis were elevation, slope aspect, slope angle, and soil depth. Results show that the occurrence of B. rosea is associated more strongly with soil depth than with other factors examined. The distribution of B. rosea was not fully explained by the factors in this study. Other potential factors determining its distribution are discussed.
Date: January 1, 1980
Creator: Parkhurst, M.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Meteorological and topographical indicators of wind energy for regional assessments

Description: Techniques using meteorological and topographical indicators of wind energy, developed by PNL and applied to the Northwest wind resource assessment, improved the reliability of the analysis of the geographical distribution of wind energy. The identification and application of these indicators led to an improved understanding of the conditions associated with high and low wind energy. Furthermore, these indicators are especially useful in complex terrain and wind-data-sparse areas for obtaining a somewhat realistic estimate of the wind energy resource.
Date: December 1, 1979
Creator: Elliott, D. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Bergmounds along the western margin of the channeled scablands, south--central Washington

Description: Distinctive mounds of till occur 100 to 240 meters above the present Columbia River along the western margins of the Pasco and Quincy basins. These mounds were formed by melting of grounded icebergs after inundation of the basins by the catastrophic glacial Lake Missoula flood(s). Most of the bergmounds are circular in plan and range in size from small clusters of erratics to mounds 50 meters in diameter and up to 4 meters high. The detritus is composed predominantly of granite, slate, argillite, quartzite, gneiss, and basalt, with grain size ranging from clay-size paticles to boulders up to 3 meters intermediate diameter. The pebbles and cobbles are glacially polished and fine-grained clasts are often striated. The bergmounds can be grouped into 4 classes on the basis of clast lithology. The most commonly occurring bergmounds are composed of 85 to 100 percent granitic debris. Bergmounds exhibiting mixed lithologies are also common. Less common are bergmounds composed of greater than 85 percent basalt and mounds composed predominantly of quartzite. The bergmounds occur in groups and are rarely found as isolated mounds. The elevation and distribution of bergmounds are related to fluvial currents and depths of the flood waters with iceberg grounding in regions of slack water and/or eddy currents.
Date: October 1, 1978
Creator: Fecht, K.R. & Tallman, A.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Basalt stratigraphy - Pasco Basin

Description: The geologic history of the Pasco Basin is sketched. Study of the stratigraphy of the area involved a number of techniques including major-element chemistry, paleomagnetic investigations, borehole logging, and other geophysical survey methods. Grande Ronde basalt accumulation in the Pasco Basin is described. An illustrative log response is shown. 1 figure. (RWR)
Date: October 1, 1979
Creator: Waters, A.C.; Myers, C.W.; Brown, D.J. & Ledgerwood, R.K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Deep electrical studies on the Snake River Plain. Final report

Description: Nine magnetometers were operated in south central Idaho to record small variations in the Earth's magnetic field. Each magnetometer recorded three components of the field, X(positive increase to magnetic north), Y(positive increase to magnetic east), and Z(positive increase downward). Persistent correlations between these components were used to detect areas of unusually high electrical conductivity near each station.
Date: January 1, 1979
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Search for shallow magma accumulations at Augustine Volcano

Description: A search was made for shallow magma accumulations beneath Augustine Volcano using primarily three geophysical techniques: (1) temperature and heat flow measurements, (2) active and passive seismic refraction, and (3) three-dimensional modeling of aeromagnetic data. With these studies it was hoped to gain insight into the interval structure of Augustine Volcano, to delineate, if possible, the size and shape of near surface magma bodies and to assess the potential of the volcano as a natural laboratory for hot rock and magma geothermal energy research. Augustine was chosen because it is a very young and very active volcano with several historic eruptions in 1812, 1883, 1935, 1964/64. One of the main targets for the geophysical studies was a summit lava dome of about 0.05 km/sup 3/ volume, extruded in 1963/64 and suspected to still contain considerable residual heat, perhaps be still partially molten years after its intrusion. Five months after the field work in 1975 this dome was exploded in January 1976. One month later, a hot (about 650 to 800/sup 0/C) viscous dome was intruded into the January summit crater.
Date: May 1, 1979
Creator: Kienle, J.; Lalla, D.J.; Pearson, C.F. & Barrett, S.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Trace metal characterization and speciation in geothermal effluent by multiple scanning anodic stripping voltammetry and atomic absorpotion analysis. Annual progress report

Description: Only the actual application of the ultratrace metal analysis methods to samples taken from geothermal sites in Washington and Oregon is covered. The in-field sampling equipment constructed for the studies, procedures developed or adapted, and the results obtained on representative samples taken from geothermal sites are described. (MHR)
Date: unknown
Creator: Kowalski, B.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Exploration of volcanic geothermal energy resources based on rheological techniques. Fourth technical status report, January 1, 1979-March 31, 1979

Description: Two tilt-meters have been operated at a site on the Oregon Institute of Technology campus at Klamath Falls, Oregon, since February 13. One strain-meter was installed at the same site on March 11 and the second on March 22. All four instruments have been tested and calibrated and are now fully operational. There have been no major problems except that the first temperature recorders were not sensitive enough and two new instruments have therefore been ordered. Both tilt and strain records obtained so far display semi-diurnal and diurnal oscillations that have the characteristics of solid earth tidal strain fields. Considering the small forcing fields, the records appear to be of a satisfactory quality.
Date: January 1, 1979
Creator: Bodvarsson, G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Variability of solar radiation at four selected stations in the United States. Final report, October 1, 1977-September 30, 1978

Description: The solar radiations considered are the total of direct and diffuse radiant energies received on a horizontal surface at ground level by a pyranometer during solar hours. Four stations, at Seattle-Tacoma, Washington; Madison, Wisconsin; Charleston, South Carolina; and Albuquerque, New Mexico were selected to represent different climatic conditions across the United States. The data were obtained from the National Climatic Center, Asheville, North Carolina. The data can be fitted by either a normal or gamma distribution and, for simplicity, a normal distribution was used. The coefficients of variation for all stations over the years were relatively low, and in general, were lower for summer months than for winter months. Of the four stations tested, Albuquerque had the lowest coefficients of variation and Seattle-Tacoma had the highest. It was estimated that no more than 16 years of records are needed for any of these stations to estimate a mean value which is within 10% of the true mean. Both the continuous daylight hours of high solar radiation (over 1100 kJ/m/sup 2//hr) and the accumulated hourly solar radiation for these durations were studied.
Date: October 1, 1979
Creator: Shen, H.W. & Wang, W.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Survey Pass NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

Description: This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Survey Pass NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form through the Grand Junction Office Information System at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume. These data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendix A describes the sample media and summarizes the analytical results for each medium. The data were subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into stream sediment samples. For the group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1000000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. In addition, maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses have been included. Further information about the HSSR program in general, or about the LANL portion of the program in particular, can be obtained in quarterly or semiannual program progress reports on open-file at DOE's Technical Library in Grand Junction. Information about the field and analytical procedures used by LANL during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the LANL and will not be included in this report.
Date: September 1, 1981
Creator: Shettel, D.L. Jr.; Langfeldt, S.L.; Youngquist, C.A.; D'Andrea, R.F. Jr. & Zinkl, R.J. (comps.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Table Mountain NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

Description: This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Table Mountain NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form through the Grand Junction Office Information System at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume. These data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendix A describes the sample media and summarizes the analytical results for each medium. The data were subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) sorting programs of Zinkl and others into stream sediment samples. For the group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1000000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. In addition, maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses have been included. Further information about the HSSR program in general, or about the LANL portion of the program in particular, can be obtained in quarterly or semiannual program progress reports on open-file at DOE's Technical Library in Grand Junction. Information about the field and analytical procedures used by LANL during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the LANL and will not be included in this report.
Date: September 1, 1981
Creator: Youngquist, C.A.; D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.; Zinkl, R.J.; Shettel, D.L. Jr. & Langfeldt, S.L. (comps.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Wind power: executive summary on research on network wind power over the Pacific Northwest. Progress report, October 1979-September 1980

Description: This research in FY80 is composed of six primary tasks. These tasks include data collection and analysis, wind flow studies around an operational wind turbine generator (WTG), kite anemometer calibration, wind flow analysis and prediction, the Klickitat County small wind energy conversion system (SWECS) program, and network wind power analysis. The data collection and analysis task consists of four sections, three of which deal with wind flow site surveys and the fourth with collecting and analyzing wind data from existing data stations.
Date: October 1, 1980
Creator: Baker, R.W. & Hewson, E.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Technical assistance. Final report, 15 August 1978-14 July 1979

Description: Under the technical assistance program up to 100 man hours of consultation can be provided, at no cost, to private, public, or corporate entities intending the direct utilization of geothermal energy. Application areas include but are not limited to, space heating and cooling, district heating, aquaculture, food production and processing, drying, chemical and pharmaceutical processes, animal husbandry, etc. Assistance is given primarily for projects in the Pacific Region states of Alaska, Washington, Oregon, California, Nevada, Arizona, and Hawaii. Activities of the technical assistance program for the reporting period are listed by state.
Date: July 14, 1979
Creator: Culver, G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Geothermal observation wells, Mt. Hood, Oregon. Final report, October 4, 1977-July 9, 1979

Description: Exploration drilling operations were conducted which included the deepening of an existing hole, designated as Old Maid Flat No. 1, from 1850 ft (564 m) to 4002 (1220 m) on the western approaches to Mt. Hood and the drilling of three new holes ranging from 940 ft (287 m) to 1340 ft (409 m). The Clear Fork hole, located in Old Maid Flat, was drilled to 1320 ft (402 m). The Zigzag hole was drilled to 940 ft (287 m) at the southwestern base of Mt. Hood in the Zigzag River valley. The remaining hole was drilled on the Timberline Lodge grounds which is on the south flank of Mt. Hood at an elevation of about 6000 ft (1829 m) above sea level. The deepening project designated as Old Maid Flat No. 1 encountered a maximum bottom hole temperature of about 180/sup 0/F (82/sup 0/C) and is to this date the deepest exploratory hole in the Mt. Hood vicinity. No significant drilling problems were encountered. The Clear Fork and Zigzag River holes were completed without significant problems. The Timberline Lodge hole encountered severe drilling conditions, including unconsolidated formations. Two strings of tools were left in the hole from structural collapse of the hole. The hole was scheduled as a 2000 ft (610 m) test. Drilling did not proceed beyond 1350 ft (412 m) and due to junk it was unobstructed to a depth of 838 ft (255 m). Observation pipe was installed to 735 ft (224 m) due to further disintegration of the hole. The work was prematurely terminated due to weather conditions.
Date: November 1, 1979
Creator: Covert, W.F. & Meyer, H.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Heat-flow data from southeastern Oregon

Description: With the exception of values from two holes drilled within 2 km of Mickey Hot Springs, 17 new heat-flow values in southeastern Oregon are within or somewhat below the range one would normally expect in nonanomalous parts of the North American Cordillera. This is not surprising for a region in which most igneous rocks on the surface are 5 m.y. old or more. There is a suggestion of a thermal anomaly associated with the very young (late Pleistocene or Holocene) Diamond Craters lava field, and the thermal regime on both sides of Steens Mountain seems to be controlled, to some degree, by lateral and vertical movement of water.
Date: January 1, 1976
Creator: Sass, J.H.; Galanis, S.P. Jr.; Munroe, R.J. & Urban, T.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Effects of controlled disturbance on ferruginous hawks as may occur during geothermal energy development

Description: The impacts on the ferruginous hawk of treatments designed to simulate those encountered during geothermal developments were assessed at the Raft River Geothermal Test Site. The objective of the study was to ascertain the tolerance limits of the disturbance-sensitive hawks to human- and development-related activities. Various impact treatments were imposed on 10 nests during the 1978 nesting season and 13 nests during 1979. Three nests were deserted in 1978 and four in 1979; treatment nests that successfully hatched eggs produced statistically fewer young than control nests. Data suggest that buffer zones of greater than or equal to 1.6 km around each nest be established to minimize deleterious impacts on this hawk species. Utilization of biological systems indicative of ecosystem stress is discussed.
Date: January 1, 1979
Creator: White, C.M.; Thurow, T. & Sullivan, J.F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Solar Energy Meteorological Research and Training Site: Region 5. Annual report, 30 September 1977-29 September 1978

Description: The primary facility which is to be a benchmark site for the acquisition of research quality solar radiation and solar energy related meteorological data has been set up and will be fully operational in the near future. The training program has been established with the introduction of two, two-quarter courses on solar radiation and meteorological measurements and on atmospheric radiative processes. Also, as part of the training program, a week-long workshop on solar energy measurement and instrumentation was conducted during the summer of '78 and a series of seminars on solar energy related topics, catering to both professionals and non-professionals, was arranged during the 1977-78 academic year. A meeting of solar radiation scientists from the five states of the region was held in Corvallis (August '78) to explore the feasibility of setting up a regional network of stations to acquire research quality solar radiation and meteorological data. Useful global irradiance measurements have been made at the five sites, making up the general quality network in Oregon, over the greater part of the year.
Date: January 1, 1979
Creator: Rao, C.R.N. & Hewson, E.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department