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Downhole Power Generation and Wireless Communications for Intelligent Completions Applications, Quarterly Report: January - March 2005

Description: The wireless gauge has not been modified or upgraded during this report period. Tubel Tech is working with the DoE Rocky Mountain test center to create a CRADA to allow Tubel Tech to test its tool in a well at the test center.
Date: May 8, 2005
Creator: Tubel, Paul
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Industrial Use of Distributed Generation in Real-Time Energy and Ancillary Service Markets

Description: Industrial consumers of energy now have the opportunity to participate directly in electricity generation. This report seeks to give the reader (1) insights into the various types of generation services that distributed generation (DG) units could provide, (2) a mechanism to evaluate the economics of using DG, (3) an overview of the status of DG deployment in selected states, and (4) a summary of the communication technologies involved with DG and what testing activities are needed to encourage industrial application of DG. Section 1 provides details on electricity markets and the types of services that can be offered. Subsequent sections in the report address the technical requirements for participating in such markets, the economic decision process that an industrial energy user should go through in evaluating distributed generation, the status of current deployment efforts, and the requirements for test-bed or field demonstration projects.
Date: October 24, 2001
Creator: Hudson, C.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Early environmental planning: A process for power line corridor selection

Description: Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) conducted an environmental planning study in the fall of 1997 to help determine the best alternative for upgrading the Laboratory`s electrical power system. Alternatives considered included an on-site power generation facility and two corridors for a 10-mile-long 115-kV power line. This planning process was conducted prior to the formal National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) review. The goals were to help select the best proposed action, to recommend modifications and mitigation measures for each alternative for a more environmentally sound project, and to avoid potential delays once the formal Department of Energy review process began. Significant constraints existed from a planning perspective, including operational issues such as existing outdoor high explosives testing areas, as well as environmental issues including threatened and endangered species habitats, multiple archeological sites, contaminated areas, and aesthetics. The study had to be completed within 45 days to meet project schedule needs. The process resulted in a number of important recommendations. While the construction and operation of the on-site power generation facility could have minimal environmental impacts, the need for a new air quality permit would create severe cost and schedule constraints for the project. From an environmental perspective, construction and operation of a power line within either corridor was concluded to be a viable alternative. However, impacts with either corridor would have to be reduced through specific recommended alignment modifications and mitigation measures.
Date: December 1, 1998
Creator: Haagenstad, T. & Bare, C.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Downhole Power Generation and Wireless Communications for Intelligent Completions Applications

Description: Tubel Tech has been working with the DoE Rocky Mountain test center to create a CRADA which will allow Tubel Tech to test its wireless gauge in a well at the test center. The CRADA agreement should be completed by the next quarter and Tubel Tech expects to perform the final test on this project during the next quarter as well. The wireless gauge has not been modified or upgraded during this report period.
Date: November 7, 2005
Creator: Tubel, Paul
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Downhole Power Generation and Wireless Communications for Intelligent Completions Applications, Quarterly Report: October - December 2003

Description: The development work during this quarter was focused in the assembly of the downhole power generator hardware and its electronics module. The quarter was also spent in the development of the surface system electronics and software to extract the acoustic data transmitted from downhole to the surface from the noise generated by hydrocarbon flow in wells and to amplify very small acoustic signals to increase the distance between the downhole tool and the surface receiver. The tasks accomplished during this report period were: (1) Assembly of the downhole power generator mandrel for generation of electrical power due to flow in the wellbore. (2) Test the piezoelectric wafers to assure that they are performing properly prior to integrating them to the mechanical power generator mandrel. (3) Coat the power generator wafers to prevent water from shorting the power generator wafers. (4) Test of the power generator using a water tower and an electric pump to create a water flow loop. (5) Test the power harvesting electronics module. (6) Upgrade the signal condition and amplification from downhole into the surface system. (7) Upgrade the surface processing system capability to process data faster. (8) Create a new filtering technique to extract the signal from noise after the data from downhole is received at the surface system.
Date: February 1, 2004
Creator: Tubel, Paul
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Downhole Power Generation and Wireless Communications for Intelligent Completions Applications, Quarterly Report: October - December 2004

Description: The development work during this quarter was focused in the test of the wireless gauge in a well. The tool was sent to Halliburton for a test. The company indicated that the test well was not available for 4 months and the company was not able to schedule a test of the wireless gauge in its test well. The tool was returned to Tubel Tech's facility in The Woodlands. Tubel Tech is looking for a new test well to deploy the wireless gauge to complete the requirements for the DOE.
Date: May 8, 2005
Creator: Tubel, Paul
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Downhole Power Generation and Wireless Communications for Intelligent Completions Applications, Quarterly Report: April - June 2003

Description: The third quarter of the project was dedicated to creating the detailed design for the manufacturing of the mechanical system for wireless communications and the power generation module. Another emphasis for the quarter was the development of the surface system and acoustic detector for the downhole tool for 2 way communications. The tasks accomplished during this report period were: (1) All detailed drawings for manufacturing of the wireless communications gauge and power generator were completed and the drawings were forward to a machine shop for manufacturing. (2) The power generator was incorporated to the mandrel of the wireless gauge reducing the length of the tool by 25% and manufacturing cost by about 35%. (3) The new piezoelectric acoustic generator was manufactured successfully and it was delivered during this quarter. The assembly provides a new technique to manufacture large diameter piezoelectric based acoustic generators. (4) The acoustic two-way communications development progressed significantly. The real time firmware for the surface system was developed and the processor was able to detect and process the data frame transmitted from downhole. The analog section of the tool was also developed and it is being tested for filtering capabilities and signal detection and amplification. (5) The new transformer to drive the piezoelectric wafer assembly was designed and manufactured. The transformer has been received and it will go through testing and evaluation during the next quarter.
Date: July 5, 2003
Creator: Tubel, Paul
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

National Account Energy Alliance Final Report for the Basin Electric Project at Northern Border Pipeline Company's Compressor Station #7, North Dakota

Description: A field research test and verification project was conducted at the recovered energy generation plant at Northern Border Pipeline Company Compressor Station #7 (CS#7) near St. Anthony. Recovered energy generation plant equipment was supplied and installed by ORMAT Technologies, Inc. Basin Electric is purchasing the electricity under a purchase power agreement with an ORMAT subsidiary, which owns and operates the plant.
Date: February 1, 2008
Creator: Sweetzer, Richard & Leslie, Neil
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Energy Strategic Planning & Sufficiency Project

Description: This report provides information regarding options available, their advantages and disadvantages, and the costs for pursuing activities to advance Smith River Rancheria toward an energy program that reduces their energy costs, allows greater self-sufficiency and stimulates economic development and employment opportunities within and around the reservation. The primary subjects addressed in this report are as follows: (1) Baseline Assessment of Current Energy Costs--An evaluation of the historical energy costs for Smith River was conducted to identify the costs for each component of their energy supply to better assess changes that can be considered for energy cost reductions. (2) Research Viable Energy Options--This includes a general description of many power generation technologies and identification of their relative costs, advantages and disadvantages. Through this research the generation technology options that are most suited for this application were identified. (3) Project Development Considerations--The basic steps and associated challenges of developing a generation project utilizing the selected technologies are identified and discussed. This included items like selling to third parties, wheeling, electrical interconnections, fuel supply, permitting, standby power, and transmission studies. (4) Energy Conservation--The myriad of federal, state and utility programs offered for low-income weatherization and utility bill payment assistance are identified, their qualification requirements discussed, and the subsequent benefits outlined. (5) Establishing an Energy Organization--The report includes a high level discussion of formation of a utility to serve the Tribal membership. The value or advantages of such action is discussed along with some of the challenges. (6) Training--Training opportunities available to the Tribal membership are identified.
Date: March 30, 2005
Creator: Retziaff, Greg
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Interconnecting Single-Phase Generation to the Utility Distribution System

Description: One potentially large source of underutilized distributed generation (DG) capacity exists in single-phase standby backup gensets on farms served from single-phase feeder laterals. Utilizing the excess capacity would require interconnecting to the utility system. Connecting single-phase gensets to the utility system presents some interesting technical issues that have not been previously investigated. This paper addresses several of the interconnection issues associated with this form of DG including voltage regulation, harmonics, overcurrent protection, and islanding. A significant amount of single-phase DG can be accommodated by the utility distribution system, but there are definite limitations due to the nature and location of the DG. These limitations may be more restrictive than is commonly assumed for three-phase DG installed on stronger parts of the electric distribution system.
Date: December 5, 2001
Creator: Dugan, R.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Downhole Power Generation and Wireless Communications for Intelligent Completions Applications, Quarterly Report: October - December 2002

Description: The first quarter of the Downhole Power Generation and Wireless Communications for Intelligent Completions Applications was characterized by the evaluation and determination of the specifications required for the development of the system for permanent applications in wellbores to the optimization of hydrocarbon production. The system will monitor and transmit in real time pressure and temperature information from downhole using the production tubing as the medium for the transmission of the acoustic waves carrying digital information. The most common casing and tubing sizes were determined by interfacing with the major oil companies to obtain information related to their wells. The conceptual design was created for both the wireless gauge section of the tool as well as the power generation module. All hardware for the wireless gauge will be placed in an atmospheric pressure chamber located on the outside of a production tubing with 11.4 centimeter (4-1/2 inch) diameter. This mounting technique will reduce cost as well as the diameter and length of the tool and increase the reliability of the system. The power generator will use piezoelectric wafers to generate electricity based on the flow of hydrocarbons through an area in the wellbore where the tool will be deployed. The goal of the project is to create 1 Watt of power continuously.
Date: March 24, 2003
Creator: Tubel, Paul
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Downhole Power Generation and Wireless Communications for Intelligent Completions Applications, Quarterly Report: January - March 2003

Description: The second quarter of the project was dedicated to convert the conceptual designs for the wireless tool and power generator into mechanical and electrical drawings as well as software code to create the new system. The tasks accomplished during this report period were: (1) Basic mechanical design for the wireless communications system was created and the detailed drawings were started. (2) Basic design for the power generator system was created and the detailed machining drawings were started. The generator design was modified to provide a direct action between the wellbore fluid flow and the piezoelectric stack to generate energy. The new design eliminates the inefficiencies related to picking up outside the tubing wall the pressure fluctuations occurring inside the tubing walls. (3) The new piezoelectric acoustic generator design was created and ordered from the manufacturer. The system will be composed of 40 ceramic wafers electrically connected in parallel and compressed into a single generator assembly. (4) The acoustic two-way communications requirements were also defined and the software and hardware development were started. (5) The electrical hardware development required to transmit information to the surface and to receive commands from the surface was started.
Date: April 24, 2003
Creator: Tubel, Paul
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) FEMP Technical Assistance U.S. Army Project 181 Implementation Challenges in Deployment of an Energy Security Microgrid for Army Reserve Facilities located on the Former Fort Devens Army Base

Description: This documents reports on a request for technical assistance from Fort Devens to analyze procurement of energy from nearby renewable generating resources.
Date: September 30, 2010
Creator: Warwick, William M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Federal Energy Management Program Technical Assistance Project 184 U.S. Customs and Border Protection Administrative and Laboratory Building, Springfield, Virginia

Description: This report documents the findings of an on-site energy audit of the U.S. Customs and Border Protection Laboratory in Springfield, Virginia.
Date: September 30, 2010
Creator: Arends, J. & Sandusky, William F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Opportunities for Combined Heat and Power in Data Centers

Description: Data centers represent a rapidly growing and very energy intensive activity in commercial, educational, and government facilities. In the last five years the growth of this sector was the electric power equivalent to seven new coal-fired power plants. Data centers consume 1.5% of the total power in the U.S. Growth over the next five to ten years is expected to require a similar increase in power generation. This energy consumption is concentrated in buildings that are 10-40 times more energy intensive than a typical office building. The sheer size of the market, the concentrated energy consumption per facility, and the tendency of facilities to cluster in 'high-tech' centers all contribute to a potential power infrastructure crisis for the industry. Meeting the energy needs of data centers is a moving target. Computing power is advancing rapidly, which reduces the energy requirements for data centers. A lot of work is going into improving the computing power of servers and other processing equipment. However, this increase in computing power is increasing the power densities of this equipment. While fewer pieces of equipment may be needed to meet a given data processing load, the energy density of a facility designed to house this higher efficiency equipment will be as high as or higher than it is today. In other words, while the data center of the future may have the IT power of ten data centers of today, it is also going to have higher power requirements and higher power densities. This report analyzes the opportunities for CHP technologies to assist primary power in making the data center more cost-effective and energy efficient. Broader application of CHP will lower the demand for electricity from central stations and reduce the pressure on electric transmission and distribution infrastructure. This report is organized into the following sections: ...
Date: March 1, 2009
Creator: Darrow, Ken & Hedman, Bruce
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A Buildings Module for the Stochastic Energy Deployment System

Description: The U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) is building a new long-range (to 2050) forecasting model for use in budgetary and management applications called the Stochastic Energy Deployment System (SEDS), which explicitly incorporates uncertainty through its development within the Analytica(R) platform of Lumina Decision Systems. SEDS is designed to be a fast running (a few minutes), user-friendly model that analysts can readily run and modify in its entirety through a visual programming interface. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is responsible for implementing the SEDS Buildings Module. The initial Lite version of the module is complete and integrated with a shared code library for modeling demand-side technology choice developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Lumina. The module covers both commercial and residential buildings at the U.S. national level using an econometric forecast of floorspace requirement and a model of building stock turnover as the basis for forecasting overall demand for building services. Although the module is fundamentally an engineering-economic model with technology adoption decisions based on cost and energy performance characteristics of competing technologies, it differs from standard energy forecasting models by including considerations of passive building systems, interactions between technologies (such as internal heat gains), and on-site power generation.
Date: May 15, 2008
Creator: Lacommare, Kristina S H; Marnay, Chris; Stadler, Michael; Borgeson, Sam; Coffey, Brian; Komiyama, Ryoichi et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Feasibility of Achieving a Zero-Net-Energy, Zero-Net-Cost Homes

Description: A green building competition, to be known as the Energy Free Home Challenge (EFHC), is scheduled to be opened to teams around the world in 2010. This competition will encourage both design innovation and cost reduction, by requiring design entries to meet 'zero net energy' and 'zero net cost' criteria. For the purposes of this competition, a 'zero net energy' home produces at least as much energy as it purchases over the course of a year, regardless of the time and form of the energy (e.g., electricity, heat, or fuel) consumed or produced. A 'zero net cost' home is no more expensive than a traditional home of comparable size and comfort, when evaluated over the course of a 30-year mortgage. In other words, the 'green premium' must have a payback period less than 30 years, based on the value of energy saved. The overarching goal of the competition is to develop affordable, high-performance homes that can be mass-produced at a large scale, and are able to meet occupant needs in harsh climates (as can be found where the competition will be held in Illinois). This report outlines the goals of the competition, and gauges their feasibility using both modeling results and published data. To ensure that the established rules are challenging, yet reasonable, this report seeks to refine the competition goals after exploring their feasibility through case studies, cost projections, and energy modeling. The authors of this report conducted a survey of the most progressive home energy-efficiency practices expected to appear in competition design submittals. In Appendix A, a summary can be found of recent projects throughout the United States, Canada, Germany, Switzerland, Sweden and Japan, where some of the most progressive technologies have been implemented. As with past energy efficient home projects, EFHC competitors will incorporate a multitude of ...
Date: September 1, 2009
Creator: Al-Beaini, S.; Borgeson, S.; Coffery, B.; Gregory, D.; Konis, K.; Scown, C. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Disposition of nuclear waste using subcritical accelerator-driven systems

Description: Spent fuel from nuclear power plants contains large quantities of Pu, other actinides, and fission products (FP). This creates challenges for permanent disposal because of the long half-lives of some isotopes and the potential for diversion of the fissile material. Two issues of concern for the US repository concept are: (1) long-term radiological risk peaking tens-of-thousands of years in the future; and (2) short-term thermal loading (decay heat) that limits capacity. An accelerator-driven neutron source can destroy actinides through fission, and can convert long-lived fission products to shorter-lived or stable isotopes. Studies over the past decade have established that accelerator transmutation of waste (ATW) can have a major beneficial impact on the nuclear waste problem. Specifically, the ATW concept the authors are evaluating: (1) destroys over 99.9% of the actinides; (2) destroys over 99.9% of the Tc and I; (3) separates Sr-90 and Cs-137; (4) separates uranium from the spent fuel; (5) produces electric power.
Date: December 31, 1998
Creator: Venneri, F.; Li, N.; Williamson, M.; Houts, M. & Lawrence, G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Molten carbonate fuel cell product design and improvement. Quarterly report, January 1--March 30, 1996

Description: Objective is to establish by 1998 the commercial readiness of MW- class IMHEX{reg_sign} MCFC power plants for distributed generation, cogeneration, and compressor station applications. This will require an advanced IMHEX{reg_sign} technology base, lower-cost manufacturing processes, verified balance-of-plant components, proven packaging and assembly approaches, demonstrated prototype power plants, finalized manufacturing and market distribution plans, and a committed commercialization team. Various tasks are reported on.
Date: December 31, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Advanced Turbine Systems program. Quarterly report, November 1, 1995--January 31, 1996

Description: Allison continued progress on the following tasks during this quarter: Task 5: market study; Task 6: GFATS system definition and analysis; Task 8.01: Castcool{trademark} technology demonstration; Task 8.04: low emissions combustion system; Task 8.07: ceramic vane design and evaluation; and Task 9.0: program management.
Date: December 31, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Small-scale AFBC hot air gas turbine power cycle

Description: The Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EER), the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC), the Will-Burt Company (W-B) and the US Department of Energy (DOE) have successfully developed and completed pilot plant tests on a small scale atmospheric fluidized bed combustion (AFBC) system. This system can be used to generate electricity, and/or hot water, steam. Following successful pilot plant operation, commercial demonstration will take place at Cedar Lane Farms (CLF), near Wooster, Ohio. The system demonstration will be completed by the end of 1995. The project is being funded through a cooperative effort between the DOE, EER, W-B, OARDC, CLF and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO). The small scale AFBC, has no internal heat transfer surfaces in the fluid bed proper. Combining the combustor with a hot air gas turbine (HAGT) for electrical power generation, can give a relatively high overall system thermal efficiency. Using a novel method of recovering waste heat from the gas turbine, a gross heat rate of 13,500 Btu/kWhr ({approximately}25% efficiency) can be achieved for a small 1.5 MW{sub e} plant. A low technology industrial recuperation type gas turbine is used that operates with an inlet blade temperature of 1,450 F and a compression ratio of 3.9:1. The AFBC-HAGT technology can be used to generate power for remote rural communities to replace diesel generators, or can be used for small industrial co-generation applications.
Date: December 31, 1995
Creator: Ashworth, R.A.; Keener, H.M. & Hall, A.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department