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In-Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occuring Marine Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution

Description: The primary accomplishments of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter were that: (1) Leg 204 scientific party members presented preliminary results and operational outcomes of ODP Leg 204 at the American Geophysical Union Fall meeting, which was held in San Francisco, CA; and, (2) a report was prepared by Dr. Gilles Guerin and David Goldberg from Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University on their postcruise evaluation of the data, tools and measurement systems that were used for vertical seismic profiling (VSP) experiments during ODP Leg 204. The VSP report is provided herein. Intermediate in scale and resolution between the borehole data and the 3-D seismic surveys, the Vertical Seismic Profiles (VSP) carried during Leg 204 were aimed at defining the gas hydrate distribution on hydrate ridge, and refining the signature of gas hydrate in the seismic data. VSP surveys were attempted at five sites, following completion of the conventional logging operations. Bad hole conditions and operational difficulties did not allow to record any data in hole 1245E, but vertical and constant offset VSP were successful in holes 1244E, 1247B and 1250F, and walk-away VSP were successfully completed in holes 1244E, 1250F and 1251H. Three different tools were used for these surveys. The vertical VSP provided the opportunity to calculate interval velocity that could be compared and validated with the sonic logs in the same wells. The interval velocity profiles in Holes 1244E and 1247B are in very good agreement with the sonic logs. Information about the Leg 204 presentations at the AGU meeting are included in a separate Topical Report, which has been provided to DOE/NETL in addition to this Quarterly Report. Work continued on analyzing data collected during ODP Leg 204 and preparing reports on the outcomes of Phase 1 projects as well as developing plans ...
Date: December 31, 2003
Creator: Rack, Frank; Guerin, Gilles; Goldberg, David & Party, ODP Leg 204 Shipboard Scientific
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Integrated reservoir management in the Carpinteria Offshore Field

Description: The Carpinteria Offshore Field is located near Santa Barbara, California. The State of California owns the portion of the field nearest the coast, and the US Federal Government the portion of the field that lies beyond a statutory three-mile coastal water limit. This mature reservoir has yielded more than 100 million barrels of oil from five platforms in its 30 years of production. The US Department of Energy`s Los Alamos National Laboratory (managed by the University of California) has joined with the State Lands Commission of California, the US Department of Interior`s Minerals Management Service, and the independent operator of the field, Pacific Operators Offshore, Inc., in a unique collaboration to redevelop the field. The reservoir management strategy for the Carpinteria Field relies on a long-term investment in simulation tools and expertise. These technologies and expertise are available to all project participants through a virtual enterprise business model.
Date: December 1998
Creator: Whitney, E. M.; Pawar, R. J. & Kendall, R. P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Feasibility of Optimizing Recovery & Reserves from a Mature & Geological Complex Multiple Turbidite Offshore Calif. Reservoir through the Drilling & Completion of a Trilateral Horizontal Well

Description: The main objective of this project is to devise an effective redevelopment strategy to combat producibility problems related to the Repetto turbidite sequences of the Carpinteria Field. The lack of adequate reservoir characterization, high-water cut production, and scaling problems have in the past contributed to the field's low productivity. To improve productivity and enhance recoverable reserves, the following specific goals are proposed: (1) Develop an integrated database of all existing data from work done by the former ownership group. (2) Expand reservoir drainage and reduce sand problems through horizontal well drilling and completion. (3) Operate and validate reservoirs' conceptual model by incorporating new data from the proposed trilateral well. (4) Transfer methodologies employed in geologic modeling and drilling multilateral wells to other operators with similar reservoirs.
Date: November 9, 1999
Creator: Coombs, Steven F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Feasibility of Optimizing Recovery & Reserves from a Mature & Geological Complex Multiple Turbidite Offshore Calif. Reservoir through the Drilling & Completion of a Trilateral Horizontal Well

Description: The main objective of this project is to devise an effective redevelopment strategy to combat producibility problems related to the Repetto turbidite sequences of the Carpinteria Field. The lack of adequate reservoir characterization, high-water cut production, and scaling problems have in the past contributed to the field's low productivity. To improve productivity and enhance recoverable reserves, the following specific goals are proposed: (1) Develop an integrated database of all existing data from work done by the former ownership group. (2) Expand reservoir drainage and reduce sand problems through horizontal well drilling and completion. (3) Operate and validate reservoirs' conceptual model by incorporating new data from the proposed trilateral well. (4) Transfer methodologies employed in geologic modeling and drilling multilateral wells to other operators with similar reservoirs.
Date: November 9, 1999
Creator: Coombs, Steven F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Seismic Evaluation of Hydorcarbon Saturation in Deep-Water Reservoirs

Description: During this last quarter of the ''Seismic Evaluation of Hydrocarbon Saturation in Deep-Water Reservoirs'' project (Grant/Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT15342), we have moved forward on several fronts, including data acquisition as well as analysis and application. During this quarter we have: (1) Completed our site selection (finally); (2) Measured fluid effects in Troika deep water sand sample; (3) Applied the result to Ursa ''fizz gas'' zone; (4) Compared thin layer property averaging on AVO response; (5) Developed target oriented NMO stretch correction; (6) Examined thin bed effects on A-B crossplots; and (7) Begun incorporating outcrop descriptive models in seismic forward models. Several factors can contribute to limit our ability to extract accurate hydrocarbon saturations in deep water environments. Rock and fluid properties are one factor, since, for example, hydrocarbon properties will be considerably different with great depths (high pressure) when compared to shallow properties. Significant over pressure, on the other hand will make the rocks behave as if they were shallower. In addition to the physical properties, the scale and tuning will alter our hydrocarbon indicators. Reservoirs composed of thin bed effects will broaden the reflection amplitude distribution with incident angle. Normal move out (NMO) stretch corrections based on frequency shifts can be applied to offset this effect. Tuning will also disturb the location of extracted amplitudes on AVO intercept and gradient (A-B) plots. Many deep water reservoirs fall this tuning thickness range. Our goal for the remaining project period is to systematically combine and document these various effects for use in deep water exploration.
Date: October 31, 2005
Creator: Batzle, Michael; Han, D-h; Gibson, R. & James, Huw
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Session: Offshore wind

Description: This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of two presentations. Due to time constraints, a discussion period was not possible. The session addressed the current state of offshore wind energy development. The first presentation ''Monitoring Program and Results: Horns Rev and Nysted'' by Jette Gaarde summarized selected environmental studies conducted to date at operating offshore wind turbine projects in Denmark and lessons from other offshore wind developments in Europe. Wildlife impacts studies from the Danish sites focused on birds, fish, and mammals. The second presentation ''What has the U.S. Wind Industry Learned from the European Example'' by Bonnie Ram provided an update on current permit applications for offshore wind developments in the U.S. as well as lessons that may be drawn from the European experience.
Date: September 1, 2004
Creator: Gaarde, Jette & Ram, Bonnie
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Session: Bat Ecology Related to Wind Development and Lessons Learned About Impacts on Bats From Wind Development

Description: This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of two paper presentations followed by a discussion/question and answer period. It was the first of the sessions to shift the focus to the issue of wind energy development's impacts specifically to bats. The presentations discussed lessons that have been learned regarding direct and indirect impacts on bats and strategies planned to address such issues. Presenters addressed what the existing science demonstrates about land-based wind turbine impacts on bats, including: mortality, avoidance, direct habitat impacts, species and numbers killed, per turbine rates/per MW generated, and impacts on threatened and endangered species. They discussed whether there is sufficient data for wind turbines and bat impacts for projects in the eastern US, especially on ridge tops. Finally, the subject of offshore impacts on bats was briefly addressed, including what lessons have been learned in Europe and how these can be applied in the U S. Paper one, by Greg Johnson, was titled ''A Review of Bat Impacts at Wind Farms in the US''. Paper two, by Thomas Kunz, was titled ''Wind Power: Bats and Wind Turbines''.
Date: 2004-09~
Creator: Johnson, Greg & Kunz, Thomas
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

In-Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Marine Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution

Description: The primary accomplishments of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter were to refine budgets and operational plans for Phase 2 of this cooperative agreement based on the scheduling of a scientific ocean drilling expedition to study marine methane hydrates along the Cascadia margin, in the NE Pacific as part of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) using the R/V JOIDES Resolution. The proposed statement of work for Phase 2 will include three primary tasks: (1) research management oversight, provided by JOI; (2) mobilization, deployment and demobilization of pressure coring and core logging systems, through a subcontract with Geotek Ltd., who will work with Fugro and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to accomplish some of the subtasks; and, (3) mobilization, deployment and demobilization of a refrigerated container van that will be used for degassing of the Pressure Core Sampler and density logging of these pressure cores, through a subcontract with the Texas A&M Research Foundation (TAMRF). More details about these tasks are provided in the following sections of this report. The appendices to this report contain a copy of the scientific prospectus for the upcoming IODP Expedition 311 (Cascadia Margin Hydrates), which provides details of operational and scientific planning for this expedition.
Date: June 30, 2005
Creator: Rack, Frank
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterizing Marine Gas-Hydrate Reservoirs and Determining Mechanical Properties of Marine Gas-Hydrate Strata With 4-Component Ocean-Bottom-Cable Seismic Data

Description: The technical approach taken in this gas-hydrate research is unique because it is based on applying large-scale, 3-D, multi-component seismic surveys to improve the understanding of marine gas-hydrate systems. Other gas-hydrate research uses only single-component seismic technology. In those rare instances when multi-component seismic data have been acquired for gas-hydrate research, the data acquisition has involved only a few receiver stations and a few source stations, sometimes only three or four of each. In contrast, the four-component, 3-D, ocean-bottom-cable (4C3D OBC) data used in this study were acquired at thousands of receiver stations spaced 50 m apart over an area of approximately 1,000 km{sup 2} using wavefields generated at thousands of source stations spaced 75 m apart over this same survey area. The reason for focusing research attention on marine multi-component seismic data is that 4C3D OBC will provide a converted-SV image of gas-hydrate systems in addition to an improved P-wave image. Because P and SV reflectivities differ at some stratal surfaces, P and SV data provide two independent, and different, images of subsurface geology. The existence of these two independent seismic images and the availability of facies-sensitive SV seismic attributes, which can be combined with conventional facies-sensitive, P-wave seismic attributes, means that marine gas-hydrate systems should be better evaluated using multi-component seismic data than using conventional single-component seismic data. Conventional seismic attributes, such as instantaneous reflection amplitude and reflection coherency, have been extracted from the P and SV data volumes created from the 4C3D OBC data used in this research. Comparisons of these attributes and comparisons of P and SV time slices and vertical slices show that SV data provide a more reliable image of stratigraphy and structure associated with gas-invaded strata than do P-wave data. This finding confirms that multi-component seismic data will be more valuable than conventional ...
Date: January 1, 2002
Creator: Hardage, B.A.; Backus, M.M.; DeAngelo, M.V.; Graebner, R.J.; Murray, P. & Rogers, L.J. Wood assisted by K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Carpenteria reservoir redevelopment project

Description: This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this project was to develop a simulation-based reservoir management system that could be used to guide the redevelopment of the Carpenteria Offshore Field, which is located just seven miles from Santa Barbara. The system supports geostatistical and geological modeling and reservoir forecasting. Moreover, it is also a shared resource between the field operator, Pacific Operators Offshore, and the mineral owners, the U.S. Department of the Interior and the State of California.
Date: August 1, 1997
Creator: Kendall, R.P.; Whitney, E.M.; Krogh, K.E.; Coombs, S.; Paul, R.G.; Voskanian, M.M. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Oil and gas field code master list 1997

Description: The Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 1997 is the sixteenth annual listing of all identified oil and gas fields in the US. It is updated with field information collected through October 1997. The purpose of this publication is to provide unique, standardized codes for identification of domestic fields. Use of these field codes fosters consistency of field identification by government and industry. As a result of their widespread adoption they have in effect become a national standard. The use of field names and codes listed in this publication is required on survey forms and other reports regarding field-specific data collected by EIA. There are 58,366 field records in this year`s FCML, 437 more than last year. The FCML includes: field records for each State and county in which a field resides; field records for each offshore area block in the Gulf of Mexico in which a field resides; field records for each alias field name (definition of alias is listed); fields crossing State boundaries that may be assigned different names by the respective State naming authorities. This report also contains an Invalid Field Record List of 4 records that have been removed from the FCML since last year`s report. These records were found to be either technically incorrect or to represent field names which were never recognized by State naming authorities.
Date: February 1, 1998
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Assist in the recovery of bypassed oil from reservoirs in the Gulf of Mexico. Quarterly report, April 1, 1995--June 31, 1995

Description: Objective is to assist the recovery of remaining noncontacted oil from known reservoirs/abandoned offshore wells on the Outer Continental Shelf in the Gulf of Mexico. Progress continues for reducing the data to fit a simplified model and redescribing the resource to accommodate known production behavior and geologic assumptions. Final reports are currently being prepared.
Date: July 30, 1995
Creator: Schenewerk, P.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Studies of offshore petroleum leases using a cartoraphic data base system

Description: An innovative system combining techniques of computer graphics and data base management has been developed at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory for the United States Geological Survey (USGS). The system is based on a CODASYL-type network data base management system. An interactive query language has been developed to allow standard data base retrievals as well as cartographic display of retrieval results. Map displays include both real-time display on a CRT terminal (such as a Tektronix 4014) and postprocessed full-color display on computer output microfilm. Since the system became operational early in 1978, it has been used in a number of ongoing studies for both the USGS and the Department of Energy (DOE). The primary application to date has been verification of the Lease, Production, and Revenue data (LPR) amassed by the USGS as part of its regulatory responsibility. Over 150 color-coded maps of offshore areas in the Gulf of Mexico have been produced for comparison with hand-drawn originals. This has proved to be an effective verification procedure, because differences between the maps are readily visible. Other current applications include provisions of both data and displays for statistical studies of bidding behavior of oil companies for both USGS and DOE projects.
Date: January 1, 1979
Creator: Sibert, J.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration within IEA Wind Annex XXIII: Phase III Results Regarding Tripod Support Structure Modeling

Description: Offshore wind turbines are designed and analyzed using comprehensive simulation codes. This paper describes the findings of code-to-code verification activities of the IEA Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration.
Date: January 1, 2009
Creator: Nichols, J.; Camp, T.; Jonkman, J.; Butterfield, S.; Larsen, T.; Hansen, A. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Environmental Risk Evaluation System (ERES) for Offshore Wind - Mock-Up of ERES, Fiscal Year 2010 Progress Report

Description: The Environmental Risk Evaluation System (ERES) has been created to set priorities among the environmental risks from offshore wind development. This report follows the conceptual design for ERES and shows what the system would look like, using a web interface created as part of a Knowledge Management System (KMS) for offshore wind. The KMS, called Zephyrus, and ERES for offshore wind, will be populated and made operational in a later phase of the project.
Date: November 1, 2010
Creator: Anderson, Richard M.; Copping, Andrea E. & Van Cleve, Frances B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Large-Scale Offshore Wind Power in the United States: Executive Summary

Description: This document provides a summary of a 236-page NREL report that provides a broad understanding of today's offshore wind industry, the offshore wind resource, and the associated technology challenges, economics, permitting procedures, and potential risks and benefits.
Date: September 1, 2010
Creator: Musial, W. & Ram, B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Seismic Evaluation of Hydrocarbon Saturation in Deep-Water Reservoirs

Description: During this last period of the ''Seismic Evaluation of Hydrocarbon Saturation in Deep-Water Reservoirs'' project (Grant/Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT15342), we finalized integration of rock physics, well log analysis, seismic processing, and forward modeling techniques. Most of the last quarter was spent combining the results from the principal investigators and come to some final conclusions about the project. Also much of the effort was directed towards technology transfer through the Direct Hydrocarbon Indicators mini-symposium at UH and through publications. As a result we have: (1) Tested a new method to directly invert reservoir properties, water saturation, Sw, and porosity from seismic AVO attributes; (2) Constrained the seismic response based on fluid and rock property correlations; (3) Reprocessed seismic data from Ursa field; (4) Compared thin layer property distributions and averaging on AVO response; (5) Related pressures and sorting effects on porosity and their influence on DHI's; (6) Examined and compared gas saturation effects for deep and shallow reservoirs; (7) Performed forward modeling using geobodies from deepwater outcrops; (8) Documented velocities for deepwater sediments; (9) Continued incorporating outcrop descriptive models in seismic forward models; (10) Held an open DHI symposium to present the final results of the project; (11) Relations between Sw, porosity, and AVO attributes; (12) Models of Complex, Layered Reservoirs; and (14) Technology transfer Several factors can contribute to limit our ability to extract accurate hydrocarbon saturations in deep water environments. Rock and fluid properties are one factor, since, for example, hydrocarbon properties will be considerably different with great depths (high pressure) when compared to shallow properties. Significant over pressure, on the other hand will make the rocks behave as if they were shallower. In addition to the physical properties, the scale and tuning will alter our hydrocarbon indicators. Gas saturated reservoirs change reflection amplitudes significantly. The goal for the final ...
Date: April 30, 2006
Creator: Batzle, Michael
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department