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Glass--Industry of the Future

Description: This 8-page brochure describes the Office of Industrial Technologies' Glass Industry of The Future; a partnership between the Department of Energy and the glass industry established to increase industrial energy and cost efficiency.
Date: January 23, 2001
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Vision: Results for Today. Leadership for Tomorrow

Description: This 16-page brochure, including 9 one-page inserts, provides an overview of the Office of Industrial Technologies and its research, development, and deployment efforts to increase industrial energy efficiency.
Date: January 25, 2001
Creator: Technologies, Department of Energy's Office of Industrial
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Clean Boiler Waterside Heat Transfer Surfaces: Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) Steam Energy Tips Fact Sheet

Description: Even on small boilers, the prevention of scale formation can produce substantial energy savings. Scale creates a problem because it typically possesses a thermal conductivity an order of magnitude less than the corresponding value of bare steel.
Date: June 15, 2001
Creator: Renfrow, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Flash High-Pressure Condensate to Regenerate Low-Pressure Steam: Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) Steam Energy Tips Fact Sheet

Description: BestPractices Steam tip sheet about recovering low-pressure steam by flashing high-pressure condensates in plant-wide steam systems.
Date: May 11, 2001
Creator: United States. Department of Energy. Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. Office of Industrial Technologies.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Insulate Steam Distribution and Condensate Return Lines: Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) Steam Energy Tips No.2

Description: Uninsulated steam distribution and condensate return lines are a constant source of wasted energy. The table shows typical heat loss from uninsulated steam distribution lines. Insulation can typically reduce energy losses by 90% and help ensure proper steam pressure at plant equipment. Any surface over 120 F should be insulated, including boiler surfaces, steam and condensate return piping, and fittings. Insulation frequently becomes damaged or is removed and never replaced during steam system repair. Damaged or wet insulation should be repaired or immediately replaced to avoid compromising the insulating value. Eliminate sources of moisture prior to insulation replacement. Causes of wet insulation include leaking valves, external pipe leaks, tube leaks, or leaks from adjacent equipment. After steam lines are insulated, changes in heat flows can influence other parts of the steam system.
Date: March 1, 2002
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Cover Heated, Open Vessels: Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) Steam Tip Fact Sheet No.19

Description: Open vessels that contain heated liquids often have a high heat loss due to surface evaporation. Both energy and liquid losses are reduced by covering open vessels with insulated lids. Table 1 provides an estimate of the evaporative heat loss per square foot of uncovered vessel surface area for various water and dry ambient air temperatures. It is assumed that the ambient air is dry with no wind currents. A fan pulling air over the uncovered tank could more than double the heat losses.
Date: January 1, 2002
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Improve Your Boiler's Combustion Efficiency: Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) Steam Energy Tips No.4

Description: Operating your boiler with an optimum amount of excess air will minimize heat loss up the stack and improve combustion efficiency. Combustion efficiency is a measure of how effectively the heat content of a fuel is transferred into usable heat. The stack temperature and flue gas oxygen (or carbon dioxide) concentrations are primary indicators of combustion efficiency. Given complete mixing, a precise or stoichiometric amount of air is required to completely react with a given quantity of fuel. In practice, combustion conditions are never ideal, and additional or ''excess'' air must be supplied to completely burn the fuel. The correct amount of excess air is determined from analyzing flue gas oxygen or carbon dioxide concentrations. Inadequate excess air results in unburned combustibles (fuel, soot, smoke, and carbon monoxide) while too much results in heat lost due to the increased flue gas flow--thus lowering the overall boiler fuel-to-steam efficiency. The table relates stack readings to boiler performance. On well-designed natural gas-fired systems, an excess air level of 10% is attainable. An often stated rule of thumb is that boiler efficiency can be increased by 1% for each 15% reduction in excess air or 40 F reduction in stack gas temperature.
Date: March 1, 2002
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Achieve Steam System Excellence

Description: This fact sheet describes OIT BestPractices Steam program's systems approach to help companies operate and maintain their industrial steam plants and thermal manufacturing processes more efficiently.
Date: December 1, 2002
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Aluminum--Industry of the Future

Description: This 8-page brochure describes the Office of Industrial Technologies' Aluminum Industry of the Future; a partnership between the Department of Energy and the aluminum industry established to increase industrial energy and cost efficiency.
Date: January 23, 2001
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Financial Assistance--Industries of the Future

Description: This 8-page brochure describes the Office of Industrial Technologies' financial assistance programs--National Industrial Competitiveness through Energy, Environment, and Economics (NICE3) and Inventions and Innovation (I and I). Cost-shared grants awarded by NICE3 provide up to $500,000 to industry-state partnerships for demonstrations of clean and energy-efficient technologies. I and I awards grants of up to $200,000 to inventors who are establishing technical performance or in the early stages of development or commercialization of energy-efficient technologies.
Date: January 24, 2001
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department