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AEC Hot Cells and Related Facilities

Description: Foreward: The primary purpose of this report is to present as an accumulation of basic information on the hot cells constructed to date by the United States Atomic Energy Commission.
Date: May 1958
Creator: Fosdick, Ellery R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A Nondestructive Assay System for use in Decommissioning a Plutonium-Handling Facility

Description: Argonne National Laboratory is decommissioning a facility used to fabricate reactor fuel elements. The equipment is contaminated with alpha emitters. The objective of decontamination is to reduce the TRU concentrations below 10 nCi/g of waste. A portable NDA procedure using Na I (TI ) gamma-spectrometric techniques was selected to measure the residual Pu and 2i 1 Am in the glove boxes. Assays were performed at different stages in the decontamination process to estimate the detection system sensitivity and the effectiveness of the cleaning efforts.
Date: July 1979
Creator: Argonne National Laboratory. Special Materials Division. Nondestructive Assay Section.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

20,000 KW Nuclear Power Plant Study for United States Atomic Energy Commission

Description: Introduction: In September of 156, Gilbert Associates, Inc., entered into a contract with the United States of America, acting through the United States Atomic Energy Commission, for the study and preliminary design of a nuclear power plant being considered for integration into a central station power system at an overseas site.
Date: July 7, 1957
Creator: Gilbert Associates, Inc.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Mission analysis report - deactivation facilities at Hanford

Description: This document examines the portion of the Hanford Site Cleanup Mission that deals with facility deactivation. How facilities get identified for deactivation, how they enter EM-60 for deactivation, programmatic alternatives to perform facility deactivation, the deactivation process itself, key requirements and objectives associated with the deactivation process, and deactivation planning are discussed.
Date: September 27, 1996
Creator: Lund, D. P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Managing the Nuclear Fuel Cycle: Policy Implications of Expanding Global Access to Nuclear Power

Description: This report is intended to provide Members and congressional staff with the background needed to understand the current debate over proposed strategies to redesign the global nuclear fuel cycle. It begins with a look at the motivating factors underlying the resurgent interest in nuclear power, the nuclear power industry's current state of affairs, and the interdependence with the nuclear fuel cycle.
Date: September 3, 2008
Creator: Nikitin, Mary Beth; Andrews, Anthony & Holt, Mark
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Managing the Nuclear Fuel Cycle: Policy Implications of Expanding Global Access to Nuclear Power

Description: This report is intended to provide Members and congressional staff with the background needed to understand the current debate over proposed strategies to redesign the global nuclear fuel cycle. It begins with a look at the motivating factors underlying the resurgent interest in nuclear power, the nuclear power industry's current state of affairs, and the interdependence with the nuclear fuel cycle.
Date: March 7, 2008
Creator: Nikitin, Mary Beth; Parillo, Jill Marie; Squassoni, Sharon; Andrews, Anthony & Holt, Mark
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Treatment of Plutonium-Bearing Solutions: a Brief Survey of the DOE Complex

Description: With the abrupt shutdown of some DOE facilities, a significant volume of in-process material was left in place and still requires treatment for interim storage. Because the systems containing these process streams have deteriorated since shutdown, a portable system for treating the solutions may be useful. A brief survey was made of the DOE complex on the need for a portable treatment system to treat plutonium-bearing solutions. A survey was completed to determine (1) the compositions and volumes of solutions and heels present, (2) the methods that have been used to treat these solutions and heels in the past, and (3) the potential problems that exist in removing and treating these solutions. Based on the surveys and on the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 94-1, design criteria for a portable treatment system were generated.
Date: March 1995
Creator: Conner, C.; Chamberlain, D. B.; Chen, L. & Vandegrift, G. F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Results for the Independent Sampling and Analysis of Used Oil Drums at the Impact Services Facility in Oak Ridge, TN

Description: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requested that Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), via the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, perform independent sampling and analysis of used oils contained within eight 55 gallon drums stored at the former IMPACT Services facility, located at the East Tennessee Technology Park in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. These drums were originally delivered by LATA Sharp Remediation Services (LSRS) to IMPACT Services on January 11, 2011 as part of the Bldg. K-33 demolition project, and the drums plus contents should have been processed as non-hazardous non-radiological waste by IMPACT Services. LSRS received a certificate of destruction on August 29, 2012 (LSRS 2012a). However, IMPACT Services declared bankruptcy and abandoned the site later in 2012, and eight of the original eleven K-33 drums are currently stored at the facility. The content of these drums is the subject of this investigation. The original drum contents were sampled by LSRS in 2010 and analyzed for gross alpha, gross beta, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), using both compositing and grab sampling techniques. The objective of this 2013 sample and analysis effort was to duplicate, to the extent possible, the 2010 sampling and analysis event to support final disposition decisions. Part of that decision process includes either verifying or refuting the assertion that oils that are currently stored in drums at the IMPACT Services facility originated from Bldg. K-33 equipment.
Date: April 25, 2013
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Enhanced Sulfate Management in HLW Glass Formulations VSL12R2540-1 REV 0

Description: The Low Activity Waste (LAW) tanks that are scheduled to provide the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) with waste feeds contain significant amounts of sulfate. The sulfate content in the LAW feeds is sufficiently high that a separate molten sulfate salt phase may form on top of the glass melt during the vitrification process unless suitable glass formulations are employed and sulfate levels are controlled. Since the formation of the salt phase is undesirable from many perspectives, mitigation approaches had to be developed. Considerable progress has been made and reported by the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) in enhancing sulfate incorporation into LAW glass melts and developing strategies to manage and mitigate the risks associated with high-sulfate feeds.
Date: November 13, 2012
Creator: Kruger, A. A.; Pegg, Ian L.; Kot, Wing; Gan, Hao & Matlack, Keith S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Redox Control For Hanford HLW Feeds VSL-12R2530-1, REV 0

Description: The principal objectives of this work were to investigate the effects of processing simulated Hanford HLW at the estimated maximum concentrations of nitrates and oxalates and to identify strategies to mitigate any processing issues resulting from high concentrations of nitrates and oxalates. This report provides results for a series of tests that were performed on the DM10 melter system with simulated C-106/AY-102 HLW. The tests employed simulated HLW feeds containing variable amounts of nitrates and waste organic compounds corresponding to maximum concentrations proj ected for Hanford HLW streams in order to determine their effects on glass production rate, processing characteristics, glass redox conditions, melt pool foaming, and the tendency to form secondary phases. Such melter tests provide information on key process factors such as feed processing behavior, dynamic effects during processing, processing rates, off-gas amounts and compositions, foaming control, etc., that cannot be reliably obtained from crucible melts.
Date: December 13, 2012
Creator: Kruger, A. A.; Matlack, Keith S.; Pegg, Ian L.; Kot, Wing K. & Joseph, Innocent
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Reduction And Sequestration Of Pertechnetate To Technetium Dioxide And Protection From Reoxidation

Description: This effort is part of the technetium management initiative and provides data for the handling and disposition of technetium. To that end, the objective of this effort was to challenge tin(lI)apatite (Sn(II)apatite) against double-shell tank 241-AN-105 simulant spiked with pertechnetate (TcO{sub 4}). The Sn(II)apatite used in this effort was synthesized on site using a recipe developed at and provided by Sandia National Laboratories; the synthesis provides a high quality product while requiring minimal laboratory effort. The Sn(ll)apatite reduces pertechnetate from the mobile +7 oxidation state to the non-mobile +4 oxidation state. It also sequesters the technetium and does not allow for re-oxidization to the mobile +7 state under acidic or oxygenated conditions within the tested period of time (6 weeks). Previous work indicated that the Sn(II) apatite can achieve an ANSI leachability index in Cast Stone of 12.8. The technetium distribution coefficient for Sn(lI)apatite exhibited a direct correlation with the pH of the technetium-spiked simulant media.
Date: November 7, 2012
Creator: Duncan, J. B.; Johnson, J. M.; Moore, R. C.; Hagerty, K.; Rhodes, R. N.; Huber, H. J. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Results of Characterization and Retrieval Testing on Tank 241-C-109 Heel Solids

Description: Eight samples of heel solids from tank 241-C-109 were delivered to the 222-S Laboratory for characterization and dissolution testing. After being drained thoroughly, one-half to two-thirds of the solids were off-white to tan solids that, visually, were fairly evenly graded in size from coarse silt (30-60 μm) to medium pebbles (8-16 mm). The remaining solids were mostly strongly cemented aggregates ranging from coarse pebbles (16-32 mm) to fine cobbles (6-15 cm) in size. Solid phase characterization and chemical analysis indicated that the air-dry heel solids contained ≈58 wt% gibbsite [Al(OH){sub 3}] and ≈37 wt% natrophosphate [Na{sub 7}F(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}�19H{sub 2}O]. The strongly cemented aggregates were mostly fine-grained gibbsite cemented with additional gibbsite. Dissolution testing was performed on two test samples. One set of tests was performed on large pieces of aggregate solids removed from the heel solids samples. The other set of dissolution tests was performed on a composite sample prepared from well-drained, air-dry heel solids that were crushed to pass a �-in. sieve. The bulk density of the composite sample was 2.04 g/mL. The dissolution tests included water dissolution followed by caustic dissolution testing. In each step of the three-step water dissolution tests, a volume of water approximately equal to 3 times the initial volume of the test solids was added. In each step, the test samples were gently but thoroughly mixed for approximately 2 days at an average ambient temperature of 25 �C. The caustic dissolution tests began with the addition of sufficient 49.6 wt% NaOH to the water dissolution residues to provide ≈3.1 moles of OH for each mole of Al estimated to have been present in the starting composite sample and ≈2.6 moles of OH for each mole of Al potentially present in the starting aggregate sample. Metathesis of gibbsite to sodium aluminate was then allowed ...
Date: September 26, 2013
Creator: Callaway, William S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Results of Characterization and Retrieval Testing on Tank 241-C-110 Heel Solids

Description: Nine samples of heel solids from tank 241-C-110 were delivered to the 222-S Laboratory for characterization and dissolution testing. After being drained thoroughly, the sample solids were primarily white to light-brown with minor dark-colored inclusions. The maximum dimension of the majority of the solids was <2 mm; however, numerous pieces of aggregate, microcrystalline, and crystalline solids with maximum dimensions ranging from 5-70 mm were observed. In general, the larger pieces of aggregate solids were strongly cemented. Natrophosphate [Na{sub 7}F(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}�19H{sub 2}O] was the dominant solid phase identified in the heel solids. Results of chemical analyses suggested that 85-87 wt% of the heel solids were the fluoridephosphate double salt. The average bulk density measured for the heel solids was 1.689 g/mL; the reference density of natrophosphate is 1.71 g/mL. Dissolution tests on composite samples indicate that 94 to 97 wt% of the tank 241-C-110 heel solids can be retrieved by dissolution in water. Dissolution and recovery of the soluble components in 1 kg (0.59 L) of the heel solids required the addition of ≈9.5 kg (9.5 L) of water at 15 �C and ≈4.4 kg (4.45 L) of water at 45 �C. Calculations performed using the Environmental Simulation Program indicate that dissolution of the ≈0.86 kg of natrophosphate in each kilogram of the tank 241-C-110 heel solids would require ≈9.45 kg of water at 15 �C and ≈4.25 kg of water at 45 �C. The slightly larger quantities of water determined to be required to retrieve the soluble components in 1 kg of the heel solids are consistent with that required for the dissolution of solids composed mainly of natrophosphate with a major portion of the balance consisting of highly soluble sodium salts. At least 98% of the structural water, soluble phosphate, sodium, fluoride, nitrate, carbonate, nitrite, sulfate, oxalate, and ...
Date: September 30, 2013
Creator: Callaway, William S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Final Report For The Erosion And Corrosion Analysis Of Waste Transfer Primary Pipeline Sections From 241-SY Tank Farm

Description: Three sections of primary transfer pipeline removed from the 241-SY Tank Farm in Hanford's 200 West area, labeled as SN-285, SN-286, and SN-278, were analyzed for the presence and amount of corrosion and erosion on the inside surface of the transfer pipe. All three sections of pipe, ranging in length between 6 and 8 in., were received at the 222-S Laboratory still in the pipe-in-pipe assembly. The annular spaces were filled with urethane foam injected into the pipes for as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) purposes. The 3-in. primary transfer pipes were first separated from the outer encasement, 6-in. pipes. The pipes were cut into small sections, or coupons, based upon the results of a non-destructive pipe wall thickness measurement which used an ultrasonic transducer. Following removal of the foam, the coupons were subjected to a series of analytical methods utilizing both optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy to obtain erosion and corrosion information. The ultrasonic transducer analysis of the SN-285 primary pipe did not show any thinned locations in the pipe wall which were outside the expected range for the 3-in. schedule 40 pipe of 216 mils. A coupon was cut from the thinnest area on the pipe, and analysis of the inside surface, which was in contact with the tank waste, revealed a continuous layer of corrosion ~ 100 11m (4 mils) thick under a semi-continuous layer of tank waste residue ~ 20 11m (1 mil) thick. This residue layer was composed of an amorphous phase rich in chromium, magnesium, calcium, and chlorine. Small pits were detected throughout the inside pipe surface with depths up to ~ 50 11m (2 mils). Similarly, the SN-286 primary pipe did not show, by the ultrasonic transducer measurements, any thinned locations in the pipe wall which were outside the expected range for ...
Date: October 4, 2012
Creator: Page, J. S.; Wyrwas, R. B. & Cooke, G. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation Of The Integrated Solubility Model, A Graded Approach For Predicting Phase Distribution In Hanford Tank Waste

Description: The mission of the DOE River Protection Project (RPP) is to store, retrieve, treat and dispose of Hanford's tank waste. Waste is retrieved from the underground tanks and delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Waste is processed through a pretreatment facility where it is separated into low activity waste (LAW), which is primarily liquid, and high level waste (HLW), which is primarily solid. The LAW and HLW are sent to two different vitrification facilities and glass canisters are then disposed of onsite (for LAW) or shipped off-site (for HLW). The RPP mission is modeled by the Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator (HTWOS), a dynamic flowsheet simulator and mass balance model that is used for mission analysis and strategic planning. The integrated solubility model (ISM) was developed to improve the chemistry basis in HTWOS and better predict the outcome of the RPP mission. The ISM uses a graded approach to focus on the components that have the greatest impact to the mission while building the infrastructure for continued future improvement and expansion. Components in the ISM are grouped depending upon their relative solubility and impact to the RPP mission. The solubility of each group of components is characterized by sub-models of varying levels of complexity, ranging from simplified correlations to a set of Pitzer equations used for the minimization of Gibbs Energy.
Date: October 19, 2012
Creator: Pierson, Kayla L.; Belsher, Jeremy D. & Seniow, Kendra R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Management Of Hanford KW Basin Knockout Pot Sludge As Spent Nuclear Fuel

Description: CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) and AREVA Federal Services, LLC (AFS) have been working collaboratively to develop and deploy technologies to remove, transport, and interim store remote-handled sludge from the 10S-K West Reactor Fuel Storage Basin on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site near Richland, WA, USA. Two disposal paths exist for the different types of sludge found in the K West (KW) Basin. One path is to be managed as Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) with eventual disposal at an SNF at a yet to be licensed repository. The second path will be disposed as remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU) waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, NM. This paper describes the systems developed and executed by the Knockout Pot (KOP) Disposition Subproject for processing and interim storage of the sludge managed as SNF, (i.e., KOP material).
Date: October 22, 2012
Creator: Raymond, R. E. & Evans, K. M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Recent Improvements In Interface Management For Hanfords Waste Treatment And Immobilization Plant - 13263

Description: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for management and completion of the River Protection Project (RPP) mission, which comprises both the Hanford Site tank farms operations and the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The RPP mission is to store, retrieve and treat Hanford's tank waste; store and dispose of treated wastes; and close the tank farm waste management areas and treatment facilities by 2047. The WTP is currently being designed and constructed by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) for DOE-ORP. BNI relies on a number oftechnical services from other Hanford contractors for WTP's construction and commissioning. These same services will be required of the future WTP operations contractor. The WTP interface management process has recently been improved through changes in organization and technical issue management documented in an Interface Management Plan. Ten of the thirteen active WTP Interface Control Documents (ICDs) have been revised in 2012 using the improved process with the remaining three in progress. The value of the process improvements is reflected by the ability to issue these documents on schedule.
Date: November 20, 2012
Creator: Arm, Stuart T.; Pell, Michael J.; Van Meighem, Jeffery S.; Duncan, Garth M. & Harrington, Christopher C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Tank 241-AY-102 Leak Assessment Supporting Documentation: Miscellaneous Reports, Letters, Memoranda, And Data

Description: This report contains reference materials cited in RPP-ASMT -53793, Tank 241-AY-102 Leak Assessment Report, that were obtained from the National Archives Federal Records Repository in Seattle, Washington, or from other sources including the Hanford Site's Integrated Data Management System database (IDMS).
Date: December 20, 2012
Creator: Engeman, J. K.; Girardot, C. L.; Harlow, D. G. & Rosenkrance, C. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

TECHNETIUM RETENTION IN WTP LAW GLASS WITH RECYCLE FLOW-SHEET DM10 MELTER TESTING VSL-12R2640-1 REV 0

Description: Melter tests were conducted to determine the retention of technetium and other volatiles in glass while processing simulated Low Activity Waste (LAW) streams through a DM10 melter equipped with a prototypical off-gas system that concentrates and recycles fluid effiuents back to the melter feed. To support these tests, an existing DM10 system installed at Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) was modified to add the required recycle loop. Based on the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) LAW off-gas system design, suitably scaled versions of the Submerged Bed Scrubber (SBS), Wet Electrostatic Precipitator (WESP), and TLP vacuum evaporator were designed, built, and installed into the DM10 system. Process modeling was used to support this design effort and to ensure that issues associated with the short half life of the {sup 99m}Tc radioisotope that was used in this work were properly addressed and that the system would be capable of meeting the test objectives. In particular, this required that the overall time constant for the system was sufficiently short that a reasonable approach to steady state could be achieved before the {sup 99m}Tc activity dropped below the analytical limits of detection. The conceptual design, detailed design, flow sheet development, process model development, Piping and Instrumentation Diagram (P&ID) development, control system design, software design and development, system fabrication, installation, procedure development, operator training, and Test Plan development for the new system were all conducted during this project. The new system was commissioned and subjected to a series of shake-down tests before embarking on the planned test program. Various system performance issues that arose during testing were addressed through a series of modifications in order to improve the performance and reliability of the system. The resulting system provided a robust and reliable platform to address the test objectives.
Date: December 11, 2012
Creator: Abramowitz, Howard; Brandys, Marek; Cecil, Richard; D' Angelo, Nicholas; Matlack, Keith S. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Technitium Management at the Hanford Site

Description: The Hanford tank waste contains -26,000 Ci of technetium-99 (Tc-99), the majority of which is in the supernate fraction. Tc-99 is a long-lived radionuclide with a half-life of -212,000 years and, in its predominant pertechnetate (TcO{sub 4}) fonn, is highly soluble and very mobile in the vadose zone and ultimately the groundwater. Tc-99 is identified as the major dose contributor (in groundwater) by past Hanford site performance assessments and therefore considered a key radionuclide of concern at Hanford. The United States Department of Energy (DOE) River Protection Project's (RPP) long-term Tc-99 management strategy is to immobitize the Tc-99 in a waste fonn that will retain the Tc-99 for many thousands of years. To achieve this, the RPP flowsheet will immobilize the majority of the Tc-99 as a vitrified low-activity waste product that will be ultimately disposed on site in the Integrated Disposal Facility. The Tc-99 will be released gradually from the glass at very low rates such that the groundwater concentrations at any point in time would be substantially below regulatory limits.The liquid secondary waste will be immobilized in a low-temperature matrix (cast stone) and the solid secondary waste will be stabilized using grout. Although the Tc-99 that is immobilized in glass will meet the release rate for disposal in IDF, a proportion is driven into the secondary waste stream that will not be vitrified and therefore presents a disposal risk. If a portion of the Tc-99 were to be removed from the Hanford waste inventory and disposed off-site, (e.g., as HLW), it could lessen a major constraint on LAW waste form performance, i.e., the requirement to retain Tc-99 over thousands of years and have a positive impact on the IDF Performance Assessment. There are several technologies available at various stages of technical maturity that can be employed for Tc-99 ...
Date: August 15, 2013
Creator: Robbins, Rebecca A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Use Of Stream Analyzer For Solubility Predictions Of Selected Hanford Tank Waste

Description: The Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator (HTWOS) models the mission to manage, retrieve, treat and vitrify Hanford waste for long-term storage and disposal. HTWOS is a dynamic, flowsheet, mass balance model of waste retrieval and treatment activities. It is used to evaluate the impact of changes on long-term mission planning. The project is to create and evaluate the integrated solubility model (ISM). The ISM is a first step in improving the chemistry basis in HTWOS. On principal the ISM is better than the current HTWOS solubility. ISM solids predictions match the experimental data well, with a few exceptions. ISM predictions are consistent with Stream Analyzer predictions except for chromium. HTWOS is producing more realistic results with the ISM.
Date: November 2, 2012
Creator: Pierson, Kayla; Belsher, Jeremy & Ho, Quynh-dao
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department