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A Small-scale Investigation of the Possibility of Constructing Low-Relief Earth-Fill Dams Using Nuclear Explosives

Description: The experiment described herein has shown that the concept of low dams produced by ballistic collision of ejecta from simultaneous detonation of properly spaced parallel rows of charges is a feasible one. Rows of 8-pound charges were buried 3 feet deep with 4-foot spacing between charges. When two such rows of charges were placed parallel and 17.5 feet apart, the maximum height of the "dam" was achieved. The spacing of 17.5 feet between rows corresponds to 4.7 times the crater radius of one 8-pound charge at the burial depth which maximizes the single-charge crater. The extrapolation of these results to larger explosions is discussed. The height decreases and the width increases as the spacing between rows is further increased. The mass of material in the "dam" cannot exceed that in the crater of one of the rows. At the spacing between rows which maximizes height, the volume of the "dam'' is about 50 percent of maximum volume theoretically achievable. At wider spacings, the volume increases to 75 percent.
Date: February 1965
Creator: Vortman, Luke J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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A Study of Mine Examination Techniques for Detecting and Identifying Underground Nuclear Explosions

Description: Report issued by the U.S. Bureau of Mines discussing techniques for detecting and studying underground nuclear explosions. As stated in the introduction, this report results from a study of only one part of the contemplated inspection system, specifically the final phases embracing on-site investigations and mine examination techniques" (p. 1). This report includes tables, illustrations, and photographs.
Date: 1962
Creator: United States. Bureau of Mines.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Preliminary Results of a Survey for Thick High-Calcium Limestone Deposits in the United States

Description: From introduction: This report contains the results of a preliminary study of limestone deposits in the United States and Alaska for the purpose of selecting those deposits of sufficient size, relief, and purity in which to conduct an underground nuclear test.
Date: January 1961
Creator: Davis, Robert E.; Williams, W. P.; Johnson, Robert Britten & Emerick, W. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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BOTE model: an analytic approach to predicting ground motion phenomena resulting from underground nuclear explosions

Description: An analytical model (the BOTE model) based upon a superposition of the limiting forms for the outgoing stress wave (i.e., a strong shock at early times decaying to a simple acoustic wave at later times) is presented as a means to describe the groundmotion phenomena resulting from underground nuclear explosions. Taking into account the effects of both the porosity and the water content of the surrounding medium, the BOTE model provides good agreement with both calculated and experimental data for times ranging from tens of microseconds to tens of milliseconds, and for distances ranging out to 350 ft/kt . (auth)
Date: November 1, 1973
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Earth Vibrations from a Nuclear Explosion in a Salt Dome

Description: The following report presents data from the SALMON experiment, an experiment made to study the mechanics of a tamped nuclear detonation in a salt dome in terms of generated shock waves as they are propagated out of the dome and progressively through the crust and mantle of the earth. This experiment was made in the Tatum salt dome, Mississippi, October 22, 1964.
Date: March 17, 1967
Creator: Mickey, W. V.; Lowrie, L. M. & Shugart, T. R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Review of Soviet data on the peaceful uses of nuclear explosions

Description: Over the last several years through a series of international meetings sponsored by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and a number of publications, the Soviet union has disclosed that they have a very active program for developing peaceful uses of nuclear explosions (PNE) in their rational economy. They have described the results of 14 experimental and industrial explosions designed to develop nine different applications in the petroleum, gas, and minerals industries as well as for water resources development. However, when one considers large number of large unidentified seismic events that have been reported over the last seven years in areas of the Soviet Union outside the normal nuclear-weapon test areas, it is obvious that they have an even more active program than they have publicly described, one that must be approaching a routine industrial technology in some areas. The PNE program that the Soviets have publicly discussed in various reports and at various meetings is summarized and, when appropriate, compared to data from the US Plowshare Program. (auth)
Date: June 28, 1973
Creator: Nordyke, M.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Utilization of the noble gases in studies of underground nuclear detonations

Description: From symposium on noble gases; Las Vegas, Nevada, USA (24 Sep 1973). The Livermore Gas Diagnostics Program employs a number of rare gas isotopes, both stable and radioactive, in its investigations of the phenomenology of underground nuclear detonations. Radioactive gases in a sample are radiochemically purified by elution chromatography, and the separated gases are radioassayed by gamma-ray spectrometry and by internal or thin-window beta proportional counting. Concentrations of the stable gases are determined by mass-spectrometry, following chemical removal of the reactive gases in the sample. The most general application of the noble gases is as device fraction indicators to provide a basis for estimating totals of chimney-gas components. All of the stable rare gases except argon have been used as tracers, as have /sup 127/Xe and /sup 85/Kr. /sup 37/Ar and /sup 85/Kr have proven to be of particular value in the absence of a good tracer material as reference species for studies of chimney-gas chemistry. The rate of mixing of chimney gases and the degree to which the sampled gas truly represents the underground gas mixture can be studied with the aid of the fission- product gases. /sup 222/Ra and He are released to the cavity from the surrounding rock and are therefore useful in studies of the interaction of the detonation with the surrounding medium. (auth)
Date: September 17, 1973
Creator: Smith, C.F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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