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Treatment of Solar Generation in Electric Utility Resource Planning

Description: Today's utility planners have a different market and economic context than their predecessors, including planning for the growth of renewable energy. State and federal support policies, solar photovoltaic (PV) price declines, and the introduction of new business models for solar PV 'ownership' are leading to increasing interest in solar technologies (especially PV); however, solar introduces myriad new variables into the utility resource planning decision. Most, but not all, utility planners have less experience analyzing solar than conventional generation as part of capacity planning, portfolio evaluation, and resource procurement decisions. To begin to build this knowledge, utility staff expressed interest in one effort: utility exchanges regarding data, methods, challenges, and solutions for incorporating solar in the planning process. Through interviews and a questionnaire, this report aims to begin this exchange of information and capture utility-provided information about: 1) how various utilities approach long-range resource planning; 2) methods and tools utilities use to conduct resource planning; and, 3) how solar technologies are considered in the resource planning process.
Date: October 1, 2013
Creator: Sterling, J.; McLaren, J.; Taylor, M. & Cory, K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fort Carson Wind Resource Assessment

Description: This report focuses on the wind resource assessment, the estimated energy production of wind turbines, and economic potential of a wind turbine project on a ridge in the southeastern portion of the Fort Carson Army base.
Date: October 1, 2012
Creator: Robichaud, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

NREL Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation: Issue 3 (Book)

Description: This quarterly magazine is dedicated to stepping beyond the technical journals to reveal NREL's vital work in a real-world context for our stakeholders. Continuum provides insights into the latest and most impactful clean energy innovations, while spotlighting those talented researchers and unique facilities that make it all happen. This edition focuses on the NREL Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation.
Date: November 1, 2012
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Solargenix Energy Advanced Parabolic Trough Development

Description: The Solargenix Advanced Trough Development Project was initiated in the Year 2000 with the support of the DOE CSP Program and, more recently, with the added support of the Nevada Southwest Energy Partnership. Parabolic trough plants are the most mature solar power technology, but no large-scale plants have been built in over a decade. Given this lengthy lull in deployment, our first Project objective was development of improved trough technology for near-term deployment, closely patterned after the best of the prior-generation troughs. The second objective is to develop further improvements in next-generation trough technology that will lead to even larger reductions in the cost of the delivered energy. To date, this Project has successfully developed an advanced trough, which is being deployed on a 1-MW plant in Arizona and will soon be deployed in a 64-MW plant in Nevada. This advanced trough offers a 10% increase in performance and over an 20% decrease in cost, relative to prior-generation troughs.
Date: November 1, 2005
Creator: Gee, R. C. & Hale, M. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Status of APS 1-Mwe Parabolic Trough Project

Description: Arizona Public Service (APS) is currently installing new power facilities to generate a portion of its electricity from solar resources that will satisfy its obligation under the Arizona Environmental Portfolio Standard (EPS). During FY04, APS began construction on a 1-MWe parabolic trough concentrating solar power plant. This plant represents the first parabolic trough plant to begin construction since 1991. Site preparation and construction activities continued throughout much of FY05, and startup activities are planned for Fall 2005 (with completion early in FY06). The plant will be the first commercial deployment of the Solargenix parabolic trough collector technology developed under contract to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. The plant will use an organic Rankine cycle (ORC) power plant, provided by Ormat. The ORC power plant is much simpler than the conventional steam Rankine cycle plant and allows unattended operation of the facility.
Date: November 1, 2005
Creator: Canada, S.; Brosseau, D.; Kolb, G.; Moore, L.; Cable, R. & Price, H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Rapid Thermal Annealing of HWCVD a-Si:H Films: The Effect of the Film Hydrogen Content on the Crystallization Kinetics, Surface Morphology, and Grain Growth

Description: We report the effect of the hydrogen (H) content (CH) on the crystallization kinetics, surface morphology and grain growth for Hot Wire CVD a-Si:H films containing 12.5 and 2.7 at.% H which are crystallized by rapid thermal anneal (RTA). For the high CH film we observe explosive H evolution, with a resultant destruction of the film for RTA temperatures >750 deg C. At RTA temperatures ~600 deg C, both films remain intact with similar morphologies. At this same lower RTA, the incubation and crystallization times decrease, and the grain size as measured by X-Ray Diffraction increases with decreasing film CH. SIMS measurements indicate that a similar film CH (<0.5 at.%) exists in both films when crystallization commences. The benefits of a two-step annealing process for the high CH film are documented.
Date: November 1, 2005
Creator: Mahan, A. H.; Reedy, R. C. Jr.; Ginley, D. S.; Roy, B. & Readey, D. W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Module Packaging Research and Reliability: Activities and Capabilities

Description: Our team activities are directed at improving PV module reliability by incorporating new, more effective, and less expensive packaging materials and techniques. New and existing materials or designs are evaluated before and during accelerated environmental exposure for the following properties: (1) Adhesion and cohesion: peel strength and lap shear. (2) Electrical conductivity: surface, bulk, interface and transients. (3) Water vapor transmission: solubility and diffusivity. (4) Accelerated weathering: ultraviolet, temperature, and damp heat tests. (5) Module and cell failure diagnostics: infrared imaging, individual cell shunt characterization, coring. (6) Fabrication improvements: SiOxNy barrier coatings and enhanced wet adhesion. (7) Numerical modeling: Moisture ingress/egress, module and cell performance, and cell-to-frame leakage current. (8) Rheological properties of polymer encapsulant and sheeting materials. Specific examples are described.
Date: November 1, 2005
Creator: McMahon, T. J.; delCueto, J.; Glick, S.; Jorgensen, G.; Kempe, M.; Pern, J. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Exploratory Reliability and Performance R&D

Description: This paper presents a brief overview of the status and accomplishments during fiscal year (FY) 2005 of the Photovoltaic (PV) Exploratory Reliability and Performance R&D Subtask, which is part of the PV Module Reliability R&D Project (a joint NREL-Sandia project).
Date: November 1, 2005
Creator: Osterwald, C. R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Cold-Climate Solar Domestic Hot Water Systems Analysis

Description: The Solar Heating and Lighting Sub-program has set the key goal to reduce the cost of saved energy [Csav, defined as (total cost, $)/(total discounted savings, kWh_thermal)] for solar domestic water heaters (SDWH) by at least 50%. To determine if this goal is attainable and prioritize R&D for cold-climate SDWH, life-cycle analyses were done with hypothetical lower-cost components in glycol, drainback, and thermosiphon systems. Balance-of-system (BOS, everything but the collector) measures included replacing metal components with polymeric versions and system simplification. With all BOS measures in place, Csav could be reduced more than 50% with a low-cost, selectively-coated, glazed polymeric collector, and slightly less than 50% with either a conventional selective metal-glass or a non-selective glazed polymer collector. The largest percent reduction in Csav comes from replacing conventional pressurized solar storage tanks and metal heat exchangers with un-pressurized polymer tanks with immersed polymer heat exchangers, which could be developed with relatively low-risk R&D.
Date: November 1, 2005
Creator: Burch, J.; Salasovich, J. & Hillman, T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development and Testing of a Power Trough System Using a Structurally-Efficient, High-Performance, Large-Aperture Concentrator with Thin Glass Reflector and Focal Point Rotation

Description: Industrial Solar Technology has assembled a team of experts to develop a large-aperture parabolic trough for the electric power market that moves beyond cost and operating limitations of 1980's designs based on sagged glass reflectors. IST's structurally efficient space frame design will require nearly 50% less material per square meter than a Solel LS-2 concentrator and the new trough will rotate around the focal point. This feature eliminates flexhoses that increase pump power, installation and maintenance costs. IST aims to deliver a concentrator module costing less than $100 per square meter that can produce temperatures up to 400 C. The IST concentrator is ideally suited for application of front surface film reflectors and ensures that US corporations will manufacture major components, except for the high temperature receivers.
Date: November 1, 2005
Creator: May, E. K. & Forristall, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Integrating Deposition, Processing, and Characterization Equipment within the National Center for Photovoltaics

Description: The purpose of the process integration project of the National Center for Photovoltaics (NCPV) is to develop an infrastructure that will allow researchers to gain new knowledge that is difficult--if not impossible--to obtain with existing equipment. This difficulty is due, in part, to the state of our existing tool set, which lacks sufficient in-situ or real-time measurement capabilities, or lacks access to analytical tools where the sample remains in a controlled environment between deposition and processing or measurement. This new infrastructure will provide flexible and robust integration of deposition, processing (etching, annealing, etc.), and characterization tools via a standardized transfer interface such that samples move between tools in a controlled ambient. Ultimately, this synergistic effort between NREL staff, universities, and the photovoltaic (PV) industry--around an integrated tool base--will add to the PV knowledge base and help move many PV technologies forward.
Date: November 1, 2005
Creator: Nelson, B.; Robbins, S. & Sheldon, P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Calculations of Optimal Source Geometry and Controlled Combinatorial Gradients in Fixed- and Rotating-Substrate PVD Systems

Description: Normalized forms of conventional flux-distribution formulas are applied to physical-vapor deposition from open-boat type sources onto static and rotating substrates. For the rotating-substrate case, the deposition geometry that yields optimal film-thickness uniformity for different source-substrate separations is derived empirically. In addition, flux-distribution formulas are used to develop a novel method for combinatorial physical-vapor deposition. With this method, a single deposition system may be used, without modification, to deposit either highly uniform or graded-composition thin-film materials.
Date: November 1, 2005
Creator: Teeter, G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department