84 Matching Results

Search Results

Advanced search parameters have been applied.

Noise Pollution from Expressways

Description: This paper provides an economic analysis of three noise abatement strategies designed to interrupt the path of noise between highways and residential areas, and makes some abatement policy suggestions.
Date: June 1976
Creator: Vaughan, Roger J. & Huckins, Larry
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Certification Testing

Description: Wind turbine certification is becoming increasingly important for companies competing in the international marketplace. In support of the U.S. wind energy industry, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) now offers testing services at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) that lead to wind turbine certification. This document describes available testing capabilities offered at NWTC. Performance testing, Noise emissions testing, blade structural testing are discussed. Efforts to integrate turbine design and certification are presented.
Date: June 1, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Facility Public Address System Review Findings

Description: Public address system operation at the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) facility was reviewed. The review was based on an Operational Readiness Review finding that public address performance was not adequate in parts of the WRAP facility. Several improvements were made to the WRAP Public Address (PA) system to correct the deficiencies noted. Speaker gain and position was optimized. A speech processor was installed to boost intelligibility in high noise areas. Additional speakers were added to improve coverage in the work areas. The results of this evaluation indicate that further PA system enhancements are not warranted. Additional speakers cannot compensate for the high background sound and high reverberation levels found in the work areas. Recommendations to improve PA system intelligibility include minor speaker adjustments, enhanced PA announcement techniques, and the use of sound reduction and abatement techniques where economically feasible.
Date: November 3, 1999
Creator: HUMPHRYS, K.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Resonant snubber based soft-switching inverters for electric propulsion drives

Description: This paper summarizes recently developed soft-switching inverters and proposes two alternative options for electric propulsion drives. The newly developed soft-switching inverter employs an auxiliary switch and a resonant inductor per phase to produce a zero voltage across the main switch so that the main switch can turn on at the zero-voltage condition. Both the auxiliary switch and the resonant inductor are operating at a fractional duty, and thus are small in size as compared to the main inverter circuit components. Operation modes in a complete zero-voltage switching cycle for the single-phase soft-switching inverter are described in detail with graphical explanations. The circuit operation was first verified by a computer simulation and then tested with an 1-kW single-phase and an 100-kW three-phase inverters. Experimental results are presented to show the superior performance in efficiency improvement, EMI reduction, and dv/dt reduction of the proposed soft-switching inverters.
Date: May 1, 1996
Creator: Lai, J.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A Study of the Effects of Gas Well Compressor Noise on Breeding Bird Populations of the Rattlesnake Canyon Habitat Management Area, San Juan County, New Mexico

Description: This report, conducted from May through July 2000, addressed the potential effect of compressor noise on breeding birds in gas-production areas administered by the FFO, specifically in the Rattlesnake Canyon Habitat Management Area northeast of Farmington, New Mexico. The study was designed to quantify and characterize noise output from these compressors and to determine if compressor noise affected bird populations in adjacent habitat during the breeding season.
Date: June 4, 2001
Creator: LaGory, K.E.; Chang, Young-Soo; Chun, K.C.; Reeves, T.; Liebich, R. & Smith, K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

LTC vacuum blasting machine (concrete): Baseline report

Description: The LTC shot blast technology was tested and is being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjunction with FIU`s evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers the evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The LTC 1073 Vacuum Blasting Machine uses a high-capacity, direct-pressure blasting system which incorporates a continuous feed for the blast media. The blast media cleans the surface within the contained brush area of the blast. It incorporates a vacuum system which removes dust and debris from the surface as it is blasted. The safety and health evaluation during the testing demonstration focused on two main areas of exposure: dust and noise. Dust exposure during maintenance activities was minimal, but due to mechanical difficulties dust monitoring could not be conducted during operation. Noise exposure was significant. Further testing for each of these exposures is recommended because of the outdoor environment where the testing demonstration took place. This may cause the results to be inaccurate. It is feasible that the dust and noise levels will be higher in an enclosed environment. In addition, other safety and health issues found were ergonomics, heat stress, tripping hazards, electrical hazards, lockout/tagout, and arm-hand vibration.
Date: July 31, 1997
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Estimation of environmental noise impacts within architectural spaces.

Description: Public Law 91-596, ''Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970,'' Dec. 29, 1970, stimulated interest in modeling the impacts of interior noise on employees, as well as the intelligibility of interior public-address and other speech intra-communication systems. The classical literature on this topic has primarily featured a statistical uniform diffuse-field model. This was pioneered by Leo L. Beranek in the 1950s, based on energy-density formulations at the former Bell Telephone (AT and T) Laboratories in the years from 1930 to 1950. This paper compares the classical prediction approach to the most recent statistical methods. Such models were developed in the late 1970s and included innovations such as consideration of irregularly shaped (e.g., L-shaped) interior room spaces and coupled spaces.
Date: May 3, 2002
Creator: Chang, Y. S.; Liebich, R. E. & Chun, K. C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Pentek metal coating removal system: Baseline report; Summary

Description: The Pentek metal coating removal system consists of the ROTO-PEEN Scaler, CORNER-CUTTER(R), and VAC-PAC(R). The system is designed to remove coatings from steel, concrete, brick, and wood. The Scaler uses 3M ROTO-PEEN tungsten carbide cutters, while the CORNER-CUTTER(R) uses solid needles for descaling activities. These are used with the VAC-PAC(R) vacuum system to capture dust and debris as removal of the coating takes place. The safety and health evaluation during the testing demonstration focused on two main areas of exposure: dust and noise. Dust exposure was minimal, but noise exposure was significant. Further testing for each exposure is recommended, since the outdoor environment where the testing demonstration took place may skew the results. It is feasible that dust and noise levels will be higher in an enclosed operating environment. Other areas of concern found were arm-hand vibration, whole-body vibration, ergonomics, heat stress, tripping hazards, electrical hazards, machine guarding, and lockout/tagout.
Date: July 31, 1997
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Noise control of radiological monitoring equipment

Description: Although vacuum pumps on continuous air monitors (CAMs) do not produce noise levels above regulatory limits, engineering controls were used to establish a safer work environment. Operations performed in areas where CAMs are located are highly specialized and require precision work when handling nuclear materials, heavy metals, and inert gases. Traditional methods for controlling noise such as enclosing or isolating the source and the use of personal protection equipment were evaluated. An innovative solution was found by retrofitting CAMs with air powered multistage ejectors pumps. By allowing the air to expand in several chambers to create a vacuum, one can eliminate the noise hazard altogether. In facilities with adequate pressurized air, use of these improved ejector pumps may be a cost-effective replacement for noisy vacuum pumps. A workplace designed or engineered with noise levels as low as possible or as close to background adds to increased concentration, attention to detail, and increased production.
Date: December 31, 1998
Creator: Rubick, R.D.; Stevens, W.W. & Burke, L.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

LTC vacuum blasting maching (concrete): Baseline report: Greenbook (Chapter)

Description: The LTC shot blast technology was tested and is being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjuction with FIU`s evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers the evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The LTC 1073 Vacuum Blasting Machine uses a high-capacity, direct-pressure blasting system which incorporates a continuous feed for the blast media. The blast media cleans the surface within the contained brush area of the blast. It incorporates a vacuum system which removes dust and debris from the surface as it is blasted. The safety and health evaluation during the testing demonstration focused on two main areas of exposure: dust and noise. Dust exposure during maintenance activities was minimal, but due to mechanical difficulties dust monitoring could not be conducted during operation. Noise exposure was significant. Further testing for each of these exposures is recommended because of the outdoor environment where the testing demonstration took place. This may cause the results to be inaccurate. It is feasible that the dust and noise levels will be higher in an enclosed environment. In addition, other safety and health issues found were ergonomics, heat stress, tripping hazards, electrical hazards, lockout/tagout, and arm-hand vibration.
Date: July 31, 1997
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

COMPARATIVE STUDY ON EXHAUST EMISSIONS FROM DIESEL- AND CNG-POWERED URBAN BUSES

Description: Couple years ago, ADEME engaged programs dedicated to the urban buses exhaust emissions studies. The measures associated with the reduction of atmospheric and noise pollution has particular importance in the sector of urban buses. In many cases, they illustrate the city's environmental image and contribute to reinforcing the attractiveness of public transport. France's fleet in service, presently put at about 14,000 units, consumes about 2 per cent of the total energy of city transport. It causes about 2 per cent of the HC emissions and from 4 to 6 per cent of the NOx emissions and particles. These vehicles typically have a long life span (about 15 years) and are relatively expensive to buy, about 150.000 euros per unit. Several technical solutions were evaluated to quantify, on a real condition cycle for buses, on one hand pollutants emissions, fuel consumption and on the other hand reliability, cost in real existing fleet. This paper presents main preliminary results on urban buses exhaust emission on two different cases: - existing Diesel buses, with fuel modifications (Diesel with low sulphur content), Diesel with water emulsion and bio-Diesel (30% oil ester in standard Diesel fuel); renovating CNG powered Euro II buses fleet, over representative driving cycles, set up by ADEME and partners. On these cycles, pollutants (regulated and unregulated) were measured as well as fuel consumption, at the beginning of a program and one year after to quantify reliability and increase/decrease of pollutants emissions. At the same time, some after-treatment technologies were tested under real conditions and several vehicles. Information such as fuel consumption, lubricant analysis, problem on the technology were following during a one year program. On the overall level, it is the combination of various action, pollution-reduction and renewal that will make it possible to meet the technological challenge of reducing emissions ...
Date: August 24, 2003
Creator: COROLLER, P & PLASSAT, G
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Environmental resources of selected areas of Hawaii: Climate, ambient air quality, and noise

Description: This report has been prepared to make available and archive background scientific data and related information on climate, ambient air quality, and ambient noise levels collected during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The US Department of Energy (DOE) published a notice withdrawing its Notice of Intent to prepare the HGP-EIS. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. The report presents a general description of the climate add air quality for the islands of Hawaii (henceforth referred to as Hawaii), Maui and Oahu. It also presents a literature review as baseline information on the health effects of sulfide. The scientific background data and related information is being made available for use by others in conducting future scientific research in these areas. This report describes the environmental resources present in the areas studied (i.e., the affected environment) and does not represent an assessment of environmental impacts.
Date: March 1, 1995
Creator: Lombardi, D.A.; Blasing, T.J.; Easterly, C.E.; Reed, R.M. & Hamilton, C.B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Migrating birds : assessment of impact on 915-MHz radar wind profiler performance at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program's southern great plains.

Description: The U. S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program is running a small network of 915-MHz radar wind profilers (RWPs) at its Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed site in northern Oklahoma and southern Kansas. Seasonal migration of passerines may cause significant interference with the operation of 915-MHz RWPs. The extent of this ''bird jamming'' depends on the radar's parameters, the place of deployment, the season, and the time of day. This poster presents a new diagnostic method for detecting possible bird contamination in RWP data, along with an evaluation of the method using a three-year data set for two RWPs.
Date: March 13, 2002
Creator: Pekour, M. S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Sperm Whale Seismic Study in the Gulf of Mexico. Summary Report: 2002-2004

Description: Report on the effect of human-generated sounds from offshore drilling on Sperm Whale in order to mitigate the negative impact of anthropogenic sound on whale behavior, navigation, and ability to communicate and locate effectively.
Date: June 2006
Creator: Jochens, A.; Biggs, D.; Engelhaupt, D.; Gordon, J.; Jaquet, N.; Johnson, M. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Environmental, economic, and energy impacts of material recovery facilities. A MITE Program evaluation

Description: This report documents an evaluation of the environmental, economic, and energy impacts of material recovery facilities (MRFs) conducted under the Municipal Solid Waste Innovative Technology Evaluation (MITE) Program. The MITE Program is sponsored by the US Environmental Protection Agency to foster the demonstration and development of innovative technologies for the management of municipal solid waste (MSW). This project was also funded by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Material recovery facilities are increasingly being used as one option for managing a significant portion of municipal solid waste (MSW). The owners and operators of these facilities employ a combination of manual and mechanical techniques to separate and sort the recyclable fraction of MSW and to transport the separated materials to recycling facilities.
Date: October 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An analysis of background noise in selected canyons of Los Alamos County

Description: The authors recorded background noise levels in six canyons within Los Alamos County in order to establish a baseline for future comparisons and to discover what noises animals are exposed to. Noise level measurements were taken within each canyon, beginning at an established starting point and at one-mile intervals up to four miles. The primary source of noise above 55 dBA was vehicular traffic. One clap of thunder provided the highest recorded noise level (76 dBA). In general, the level of noise, once away from highways and parking lots, was well below 60 dBA.
Date: October 1, 1997
Creator: Huchton, K.; Koch, S.W. & Robinson, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

LTC 1073 vacuum blasting (concrete) human factors assessment -- Baseline (summary)

Description: The LTC 1073 Vacuum Blasting Machine uses a high capacity, direct pressure blasting system incorporating a continuous feed for the blast media. The blast media cleans the surface within the contained brush area of the blast head. A vacuum system removes dust and debris from the surfaces as it is blasted. After cleaning the surface, the abrasive, together with the rust or coating that was removed from the surface, is vacuumed into the machine through the suction hose. The dust separator contains angled steel collision pads, working with the force of gravity, to allow any reusable abrasive to fall back into the pressure vessel. The filters are manually back flushed to prevent clogging. After back flushing, dust is dumped from the dust chamber into the dust collection bag or drum by operation of the bellows valve. The safety and health evaluation during the testing demonstration focused on dust and noise exposure. Dust exposure was found to be minimal, but noise exposure was potentially significant. Further testing for each of these exposures is recommended because the outdoor environment where the testing demonstration took place may cause the results to be inapplicable to indoor settings. It is feasible that the dust and noise levels will be higher in an enclosed operating environment. Other safety and health issues found were ergonomics, heat stress, tripping hazards, lockout/tagout, and arm-hand vibration.
Date: July 31, 1997
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

US Air Force Materiel Command`s second round ECAMP results

Description: The United States Air Force`s Environmental Compliance Assessment and Management Program (ECAMP) is a process to improve Air Force environmental compliance, management, and programmatic support. Midway into the third round of Command-initiated (external) ECAMP evaluations for its fourteen Air Logistics and Systems Centers, the Air Force Material Command (AFMC) is continuing to identify the root causes of instances of environmental noncompliance. The AFMC initiated an analysis of all negative findings identified during the second round of external ECAMP evaluations (June 1991 to January 1993). Presented here is a summary of the analysis with emphasis on trends and root causes.
Date: June 1, 1995
Creator: Levenson, J. B.; Horstman, P. & Weaver, M. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Conceptual design of a centrifugal CO{sub 2} cleaning device. Final report/project accomplishments summary

Description: The L.A.W. Group, Inc., Cryokinetics Division designs and manufactures cryogenic cleaning devices in their Wichita, Kansas, facility. The L.A.W. Group, Inc., Cryokinetics Division identified a market need for a new cryogenic cleaning device that would generate a high level of kinetic energy at a lower operating pressure and noise level. This market need is being generated because the existing products when operated at high kinetic energy levels create an excessive amount of noise and consume a very high level of compressed gases. The intention of this CRADA effort was to join AlliedSignal`s expertise in knowledge of manufacturing processes, design, and capabilities in performing solid modeling together with The L.A.W. Group, Inc., Cryokinetics Division`s knowledge of cryogenic cleaning design and manufacturing into a design team to create a prototype of a high-energy centrifugal cryogenic cleaning device.
Date: December 1, 1997
Creator: Harrington, J.N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A robotic inspection experimental system (ARIES) and BOA

Description: ARIES consists of a 6-wheeled K3A mobile platform, a compact subturret, a sonar imaging system, a laser-based light detection and ranging (lidar) navigation beacon system, and a camera positioning system. It has a sonar imaging system used in navigation and collision avoidance and an automatic docking/charging system. Drum-referencing algorithms and camera-positioning algorithms have been included in the primitive instruction set for the robot. The robot`s navigation is based on Synchro-Drive, a patented design that utilizes concentric shafts to distribute drive and steering power to the six wheels simultaneously. ARIES uses a virtual path concept in which only a limited amount of information needs to be provided to the control computer in order to get the vehicle moving. The safety and health evaluation, during the human factors assessment, found several areas of concern including ergonomics, laser hazards, tripping hazards, fall-from-above and struck-by hazards, electrical hazards, and decontamination of the system. BOA is a self-propelled automated mini-enclosure, able to remove insulation from installed pipes, primarily of 4 inch nominal outside diameter. The system is designed for two operators: one oversees the abatement head operation from a distance of 10 or 15 feet using a pendant control and the other bags the debris at a cyclonic bagging station that is attached by a vacuum hose to the cutting head. Since the abatement head is its own enclosure, there may be no need for further enclosures to be built. The system wets and removes asbestos insulation automatically, cutting the debris into consistent chunks and moving the wave under a strong vacuum to a bagging machine. Prior to reaching the bagging operation, the material passes through a water separator which greatly reduces the weight of the debris and allows recirculation of water, after sufficient filtration. The safety and health evaluation, during the human factors assessment, ...
Date: February 1, 1998
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

LTC America`s, Inc. PTC-6 vacuum system (metal): Baseline report

Description: The LTC coating removal technology was tested and is being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjunction with FIU`s evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers the evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The LTC coating removal system consisted of several hand tools, a Roto Peen scaler, and a needlegun. They are designed to remove coatings from steel, concrete, brick, and wood. These hand tools are used with the LTC PTC-6 vacuum system to capture dust and debris as removal of the coating takes place. The safety and health evaluation during the testing demonstration focused on two main areas of exposure: dust and noise. The dust exposure was minimal but noise exposure was significant. Further testing for each exposure is recommended because of the environment where the testing demonstration took place. It is feasible that the dust and noise levels will be higher in an enclosed operating environment of different construction. In addition, other areas of concern found were arm-hand vibration, whole body vibration, ergonomics, heat stress, tripping hazards, electrical hazards, machine guarding, and lockout/tagout.
Date: July 31, 1997
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

LTC vacuum blasting machine (metal): Baseline report

Description: The LTC coating removal technology was tested and is being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjunction with evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers the evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The LTC coating removal system consisted of several hand tools, a Roto Peen scaler, and a needlegun. They are designed to remove coatings from steel, concrete, brick, and wood. These hand tools are used with the LTC PTC-6 vacuum system to capture dust and debris as removal of the coating takes place. The safety and health evaluation during the testing demonstration focused on two main areas of exposure: dust and noise. The dust exposure was minimal but noise exposure was significant. Further testing for each exposure is recommended because of the environment where the testing demonstration took place. It is feasible that the dust and noise levels will be higher in an enclosed operating environment of different construction. In addition, other areas of concern found were arm-hand vibration, whole-body vibration, ergonomics, heat stress, tripping hazards, electrical hazards, machine guarding, and lockout/tagout.
Date: July 31, 1997
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department