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Indigenous Private Enterprise in Nigeria

Description: This study is directed towards the relationship between the economic environment in Nigeria and its indigenous private sector from 1960 to 1980. Nigeria practices mixed capitalism aided by the national government, foreign governments and international agencies. The 1972 and 1977 Indigenization Decrees were passed to eliminate foreigners from certain economic fields to be replaced by Nigerian citizens. The economic environment of Nigeria is less than suitable for the operation of modern business. Roads, telephones, telex services, electricity services, law and order and a few other critical underpinnings of business are inefficiently provided for in the economic system of the country. Despite the unfortunate economic environment Nigerian Entrepreneurs, especially the Ibos, have been particularly industrious. However, indigenous private enterprise in the country has not been especially successful.
Date: May 1984
Creator: Shitah, Chapi Martin
Partner: UNT Libraries

Some Implications of Population Growth on the Economic Development of Nigeria: 1952-1982

Description: This is a demographic study of Nigeria between 1952-1982. Relationships between population growth and economic development are described in detail. Comparisons are made of demographic growth in Nigeria with other developing countries, particularly those in Africa. Population pressure, the condition of the rural areas, and some internal and external population problems are discussed in length. The government's position and the public view on population control and family planning programs are also examined. Current programs of family limitation are discussed and evaluated. The study concludes with recommendations for solutions. Emphasis is placed on the need for immediate recognition and action. Various solutions, particularly education, are evaluated.
Date: August 1984
Creator: Oparanozie, Nnamdi Pat
Partner: UNT Libraries

International Political Economy of External Economic Dependence and Foreign Investment Policy Outputs as a Component of National Development Strategy: Nigeria 1954-1980

Description: This study examined the effects and expectations of external economic dependence on foreign investment policy outputs with particular reference to the Nigerian experience between 1954 and 1980. Three basic kinds of external economic dependence were studied: foreign investment, the penetration of the Nigerian economy by foreign capital through the agency of the multinational corporations (MNCs); foreign trade, a measure of the Nigerian economy's participation in the world market; and foreign aid (loans and grants), a measure of Nigeria's reliance on financial assistance from governments and international financial inst itutions. For the most part, the level of Nigeria's economic dependence was very high. However, economic dependency is not translated into changes in foreign investment policy in favor of the foreign investors in Nigeria as is predicted by the dependency paradigm. The Nigerian case casts doubt on the dependency paradigm as a framework for fully explaining factors that may determine foreign direct investment policy changes that occur in a less developed Third World country. In other words, the dependency paradigm has a limited explanatory power; there is a factor independent of the economic factor operating out of the control of global capitalism (the center of the center in alliance with the center of the periphery); and that factor is the political process in Nigeria. The web of the Nigerian political process involves the various aspects of its internal functioning such as the manner in which needs, interests and demands are conveyed from the individuals and groups in the country to those performing state duties. Thus, Nigerian policy makers were more influenced by those elements than pure economic considerations treated in isolation.
Date: December 1986
Creator: Ighoavodha, Frederick J. O. (Frederick J. Ofuafo)
Partner: UNT Libraries