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Indigenous Private Enterprise in Nigeria

Description: This study is directed towards the relationship between the economic environment in Nigeria and its indigenous private sector from 1960 to 1980. Nigeria practices mixed capitalism aided by the national government, foreign governments and international agencies. The 1972 and 1977 Indigenization Decrees were passed to eliminate foreigners from certain economic fields to be replaced by Nigerian citizens. The economic environment of Nigeria is less than suitable for the operation of modern business. Roads, telephones, telex services, electricity services, law and order and a few other critical underpinnings of business are inefficiently provided for in the economic system of the country. Despite the unfortunate economic environment Nigerian Entrepreneurs, especially the Ibos, have been particularly industrious. However, indigenous private enterprise in the country has not been especially successful.
Date: May 1984
Creator: Shitah, Chapi Martin
Partner: UNT Libraries

International Political Economy of External Economic Dependence and Foreign Investment Policy Outputs as a Component of National Development Strategy: Nigeria 1954-1980

Description: This study examined the effects and expectations of external economic dependence on foreign investment policy outputs with particular reference to the Nigerian experience between 1954 and 1980. Three basic kinds of external economic dependence were studied: foreign investment, the penetration of the Nigerian economy by foreign capital through the agency of the multinational corporations (MNCs); foreign trade, a measure of the Nigerian economy's participation in the world market; and foreign aid (loans and grants), a measure of Nigeria's reliance on financial assistance from governments and international financial inst itutions. For the most part, the level of Nigeria's economic dependence was very high. However, economic dependency is not translated into changes in foreign investment policy in favor of the foreign investors in Nigeria as is predicted by the dependency paradigm. The Nigerian case casts doubt on the dependency paradigm as a framework for fully explaining factors that may determine foreign direct investment policy changes that occur in a less developed Third World country. In other words, the dependency paradigm has a limited explanatory power; there is a factor independent of the economic factor operating out of the control of global capitalism (the center of the center in alliance with the center of the periphery); and that factor is the political process in Nigeria. The web of the Nigerian political process involves the various aspects of its internal functioning such as the manner in which needs, interests and demands are conveyed from the individuals and groups in the country to those performing state duties. Thus, Nigerian policy makers were more influenced by those elements than pure economic considerations treated in isolation.
Date: December 1986
Creator: Ighoavodha, Frederick J. O. (Frederick J. Ofuafo)
Partner: UNT Libraries

Population Growth and Socioeconomic Development in Nigeria 1960 - 1984

Description: This study is directed toward the relationship between population growth and socioeconomic development in Nigeria for the period 1960-1984. A controlled population growth would positively affect every segment of the economic and social environment. With hunger and starvation, disease, poverty and illiteracy plaguing large portions of the world, Nigeria's limited resources would best be utilized if shared among a smaller population, Nigeria, like other developing African countries, does not have an official population control policy. The diversity in the Nigerian culture, the controversial nature of the subject of population control, and possibly, implementation difficulties, account for the absence of a population control policy in Nigeria. This study offers in its concluding section some policy recommendations on how to tackle Nigeria's population problem.
Date: May 1987
Creator: Asongwe, Michael N. (Michael Nde)
Partner: UNT Libraries

Economic Developments and Policies in Post-Civil War Nigeria

Description: The approach of the study is historical and institutional. The thesis compares the performance of the pre-war Nigerian economy to its post-war performance. The study analyzes the role of petroleum production, agriculture, and the banking system as the major generators of growth in the economy. It portrays the political framework of the country, and endeavors to give a clear and concise understanding of the economic and political implications of the war. Development planning policy issues are examined and evaluated to ascertain the degree to which Nigerian planners are fully aware of the nation's development obstacles.
Date: December 1978
Creator: Umo, Akpan Akpan
Partner: UNT Libraries

Some Implications of Population Growth on the Economic Development of Nigeria: 1952-1982

Description: This is a demographic study of Nigeria between 1952-1982. Relationships between population growth and economic development are described in detail. Comparisons are made of demographic growth in Nigeria with other developing countries, particularly those in Africa. Population pressure, the condition of the rural areas, and some internal and external population problems are discussed in length. The government's position and the public view on population control and family planning programs are also examined. Current programs of family limitation are discussed and evaluated. The study concludes with recommendations for solutions. Emphasis is placed on the need for immediate recognition and action. Various solutions, particularly education, are evaluated.
Date: August 1984
Creator: Oparanozie, Nnamdi Pat
Partner: UNT Libraries

Nigerian Military Government and Problems of Agricultural Development

Description: This thesis attempts to analyze the military government's role in solving the country's agricultural problems. This analysis is essential because it was during the military's stay in power that Nigeria's potential as a selfsufficient and food exporting nation declined. Materials collected to analyze the above problems reveal that the military government's lack of adequate personnel to supervise and implement decisions taken on agriculture, unplanned schemes, and unresearched projects were partly responsible for the government's inability to solve Nigeria's agricultural problems. While it may be necessary to blame the military government for not being able to completely solve the country's numerous agricultural problems, the presence of global political and economic decisions seriously hampered measures taken by the military government.
Date: August 1985
Creator: Agboaye, Izilin Christiana
Partner: UNT Libraries

Comparative Development with Large Endowments of Capital (Oil Revenue) Three Case Studies Nigeria, Iran, Libya

Description: This study is an examination and comparison of the manner in which Nigeria, Iran and Libya used oil revenue for their economic development. The research methodology was the case study approach, utilizing statistical time series data, as well as a historical profile of each country's income and expenditure accounts. As a prelude to the oil injection, the pre-oil revenue economy, the history of the oil industry, and the previously implemented development plans of each of these nations is surveyed. The impact of the oil revenues on the standard of living and the non-oil sectors of these economies is examined. The paper concludes with projections concerning each country's ability to continue to promote economic development when its exhaustible oil reserves runs out.
Date: December 1983
Creator: Inyang, Eno F.
Partner: UNT Libraries

An Examination of Higher Education in the Process of Economic Development and Social Change in Nigeria

Description: The problem of this study was to describe higher education in relation to economic development and social change in Nigeria. The purposes of this study were (1) to identify the needs for economic development and social change in Nigeria; (2) to relate higher education goals to the identified needs; (3) to determine the perceptions of the participating groups of students, faculty members, academic administrators, and government officials about what priority of importance is being placed and should be placed on higher education goals to achieve the national needs; (4) to formulate recommendations for the future development of higher education in relation to economic development and social change in Nigeria.
Date: May 1983
Creator: Enin-Okut, Akanuboh A.
Partner: UNT Libraries